Solar and Biomass Energy in the Philippines
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Schletter Group continues its growth course in Southeast Asia. The company supplies the mounting systems for a 150 MW solar power plant in the Philippines.
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In a tender for 50 MW of solar, local PV module manufacturer and project developer, Solar Philippines submitted a bid of P2.34 (US$0.044) per kWh.
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As solar prices drop, solar growth will become increasingly market-driven. People will simply decide to solarize their rooftops.

Second, because the DoE remains inexplicably blind to this trend. DoE’s Philippine Energy Plan (PEP) 2016-2040 still assumes 70% baseload share until 2040. Assuming 50% solar by 2040, for instance, means a baseload share in the capacity mix of 43%, not 70%, by 2040. DoE’s flawed assumption overestimates the country’s baseload requirement by 63% (70 divided by 43, minus 1), creating a huge bloat in its baseload plans. DoE’s PEP 2016-2040 includes three more serious flaws, further raising the baseload bloat to more than 100%. This baseload bloat will lead to stranded assets in the future because those recently constructed coal and nuclear plants will be unable to sell half of their output. The fossil industry, as in the past, will surely try to pass on the cost of these stranded assets to the consumer. Why buy expensive, dirty electricity from the grid when we can produce cheap, clean electricity from our rooftops?

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Investment in and deployment of distributed solar photovoltaic (PV) energy-battery energy storage systems is soaring in the Philippines amid efforts to electrify the countryside, eradicate poverty, boost grass-roots socioeconomic development and realize the nation’s climate change and sustainable development goals.

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Rooftop solar power systems will account for at least one-third of all solar installations in the Philippines by 2030 as the popularity of this renewable energy platform continues to rev up, according to Market Insights Reports.
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Philippine power producer AboitizPower Corporation is venturing into the rooftop solar sector with the launch of a new company

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The first solar-plus-storage microgrid in Asia to use Tesla’s Powerpack energy storage system is designed to end power reliability issues for a Philippines community, long used to losing light and productivity to brownouts. The launch of 'Solar Para Sa Bayan', an initiative by Solar Philippines founder Leandro Leviste to bring cheaper, more reliable power to areas poorly served by utilities, was marked by the execution of a project utilising 2MW of PV panels manufactured by his company, 2MWh of Tesla's Powerpack lithium-ion industrial and grid-scale battery storage and 2MW of diesel backup. It is designed to supply reliable power 24 hours a day, over the entire year, at 50% less than the full cost of the local electric supply. According to Solar Philippines, local energy supply will no longer have to be subsidised by the state to the tune of over PHP30 million (US$577,000) annually.

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The need to install additional power generation continues to be one of the most relevant issues in Southeast Asia. It’s a region with GDP growth rates of above 6% p.a. during the past decade[1] and where around one-fifth of its population (~25% larger than that of the EU) is still without access to electricity. Besides striving to meet the power demand, the growing dependence on fossil-based power generation and the increasing costs in providing power to its consumers have been the main challenges faced by utilities in the past decade. Unsubsidized electricity prices range between USD 0.13[2] to USD 0.30[3] in the region today. If we exclude the ultra-developed and wealthy city-state of Singapore, the GDP per capita only ranges between 4%–27% of the EU average, and therefore exposes the majority of Southeast Asian consumers to even higher burdens compared to consumers elsewhere, for example, in the EU. In recent years many plans for additional conventional power plants have encountered fierce opposition from locals. Even in more authoritarian governed countries in Southeast Asia, this has led to a substantial cancellation of such power plant projects. For example, in Thailand, a long-pursued plan for a 3,200 MW coal-fired power plant in the province …
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Solar Philippines has offered to provide continuous PV-generated electricity to power distributor Manila Electric Co. (Meralco) at a rate of PHP 2.99 ($0.058)/kWh.
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Filipino energy secretary Alfonso Cusi has euphemistically admitted that the suspension of four commissioners of the Energy Regulatory Commission (ERC) may cause delays in power projects, while the already inert solar sector has seen conditions go from bad to worse. Solar industry members told PV Tech that the suspensions have in fact brought the entire power industry to a standstill, not only delaying renewable energy projects, but also impacting a long list of pending policy mechanisms that support alternative energy sources..

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ABOITIZ POWER Corp. (AboitizPower) is taking a hit of P3.7 billion as it permanently stopped the operations of a biomass power plant because of the lack of organic materials to produce electricity. “Our top consideration now is to balance the interests of all our stakeholders, including that of Aseagas’ employees,” said AboitizPower President and Chief …
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Cheaper renewable technologies open new options for cost-effective electricity access
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ABOUT 10 PROJECTS in biomass and run-of-river hydroelectric power generation are set to benefit should the Department of Energy (DoE) approve the extension of the guaranteed feed-in-tariff (FiT) offered for these renewable energy technologies. “This week, I’ll formally endorse (an extension), with all the position papers. I’ve been discussing it also with the DoE. Let’s …
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The Philippines program, Enabling Distributed Solar Power in the Philippines, was preliminarily selected for funding by the NAMA Facility under its 4th call for proposals. The Center for Clean Air Policy (CCAP) worked with the Philippines Department of Energy over the last 2 years to develop this €20 million program that will accelerate the uptake of rooftop solar photovoltaic (PV) installations by residential, commercial, industrial, and government facilities under the country’s net metering regulations and under self-supply options. The project also supports the Philippines commitment to addressing climate change, and is endorsed by the Philippines Climate Change Commission. Other key partners for the program are the LGU Guarantee Corporation and the World Bank.
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IEEFA Asia: In the Time of Solar, Ratepayers and Investors Alike Should Be Wary of Philippines Coal Expansion Stranded Assets in the Making as Global Transition Takes Root The Philippines, like many of its ASEAN neighbors, is at a crossroads in a potential energy transition that—if managed...
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Southeast Asia's solar industry thrives amidst dimming market expectations
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Utility-scale solar projects and hundreds of other power projects in the Philippines are being held up by pending approvals at the Energy Regulatory Commission (ERC), a problem compounded by last week’s dismissal of ERC chairman Jose Vicente Salazar for grave misconduct related to allegations of corruption. ERC, which is already lacking in manpower, is in further trouble after the Philippine Congress recently slashed its 2018 budget down to 1000 pesos (US$20) in September, in line with President Rodrigo Duterte's instruction to abolish the regulatory body. Despite the problem, at least one solar firm has ploughed on with building projects without ERC-regulated utility PPA's, while other commentators have cited the unregulated and corporate solar PPA markets in the Philippines.

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Cebu’s leading power distributor Visayan Electric Company (Veco) stated that though they are still using coal and some fossil fuel, 50% of their electric supply now comes from renewable energy. In the launching forum last Thursday June 29 in a national campaign for a shift to renewable, Veco chief operating officer Anton Perdices said, “renewable …
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EU Green Energy Companies to Explore PH Business Opportunities A European business delegation under the EU Business Avenues (EUBA) in South East Asia Programme will be visiting the Philippines later this October to explore business opportunities in the country.
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While energy access has increased as a proportion of the population, in absolute numbers there are still almost as many households without access as there were 8 years ago. More than one billion people still do not have access to electricity, most of them living in remote rural areas. With the tremendous momentum observed in the energy access space over the recent years, why have solar energy companies only been able to serve a fraction of the off-grid population?
In this two-part webinar series, Hystra, in partnership with the Practitioner Hub for Inclusive Business and the Inclusive Business Action Network, draws on learnings from over 26 pioneering practitioners to explore how to overcome the two critical challenges to the replication of off-grid solar energy companies: distributing in frontier markets, and scaling up financing.
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Plummeting wholesale prices put the country on track to meet renewable energy targets set out in the Paris agreement
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A look forward to how we get to Terawatts of solar power capacity.
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Nuclear energy was supposed to be in the midst of a renaissance, but instead it's going out of business.
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According to data released by the Department of Energy, the Philippines installed 903 MW of solar power plants in 2016. The country awarded 166 solar projects (including 150 grid-connected and 16 off-grid) with a potential capacity of 4,081 MW (4,077 MW grid-connected) of which only 903 MW was installed. Of the installed capacity, 900 MW is connected to the grid while the off grid projects totaled 3 MW in capacity. The country approved 755 renewable projects with a potential capacity of 16,948.98 MW of which projects totaling 4,521.74 were installed in 2016.
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PV2 Energie said the project with Uratex had received support from two programs backed by the German government, namely: the KfW-DEG Up-Scaling programme and the worldwide dena Renewable Energy Solutions Programme coordinated by Deutsche Energie-Agentur (dena), the German energy agency.

The project was co-financed by the German Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi) within the German Energy Solutions Initiative, it added.
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