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the impact of social media on socialising
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Student Account Signup | SurveyGizmo

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SurveyMonkey : logiciel gratuit de sondage en ligne et d'enquête par questionnaire

Créez et publiez des sondages en ligne en quelques minutes. Affichez les résultats sous forme de graphiques et en temps réel. SurveyMonkey propose un service gratuit de création de questionnaires et de sondages en ligne.
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The Future of Social Media | Heidi Cohen

The Future of Social Media | Heidi Cohen | socialmedia_socialising | Scoop.it
While many of us active on social media networks today would like to think it’s a recent phenomenon, the reality is that social media’s been around in various forms since the beginning of the Internet (and before.) Given this evolution, where is...
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Tacit knowledge - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Tacit knowledge (as opposed to formal or explicit knowledge) is the kind of knowledge that is difficult to transfer to another person by means of writing it down or verbalising it. For example, stating to someone that London is in the United Kingdom is a piece of explicit knowledge that can be written down, transmitted, and understood by a recipient. However, the ability to speak a language, use algebra,[1] or design and use complex equipment requires all sorts of knowledge that is not always known explicitly, even by expert practitioners, and which is difficult to explicitly transfer to users.

While tacit knowledge appears to be simple, it has far reaching consequences and is not widely understood.

The term “tacit knowing” or “tacit knowledge” was first introduced into philosophy by Michael Polanyi in 1958 in his magnum opus Personal Knowledge. He famously introduces the idea in his later work The Tacit Dimension with the assertion that “we can know more than we can tell.”.[2] According to him, not only is there knowledge that cannot be adequately articulated by verbal means, but also all knowledge is rooted in tacit knowledge in the strong sense of that term.

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The Thinking Person's Guide to Autism: How Apps Can Support Social Skills

The Thinking Person's Guide to Autism: How Apps Can Support Social Skills | socialmedia_socialising | Scoop.it
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Does the Internet increase or narrow our socialising? - On Line Opinion - 26/9/2011

Does the Internet increase or narrow our socialising? - On Line Opinion - 26/9/2011 | socialmedia_socialising | Scoop.it
The ABS say we are socialising less and using the Internet more, but what does this mean?
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One in four socialises more online than in person - Telegraph

One in four socialises more online than in person - Telegraph | socialmedia_socialising | Scoop.it
One in four people spend more time socialising online, using sites such as Facebook, than they do in person, according to research.
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How Social Media is Affecting the Way We Speak and Write

How Social Media is Affecting the Way We Speak and Write | socialmedia_socialising | Scoop.it
Do you speak "social?" There is a lot of writing out there about the effects of social media on business, marketing, branding and customer services.
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Online Survey Software | SurveyGizmo

Online Survey Software | SurveyGizmo | socialmedia_socialising | Scoop.it
Finally, a survey toolthat makes you look good. At SurveyGizmo we believe it's our job to make you successful. We built
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Social Media’s Future: 5 Important Trends [Research & Charts] | Heidi Cohen

Social Media’s Future: 5 Important Trends [Research & Charts] | Heidi Cohen | socialmedia_socialising | Scoop.it
Social media is maturing. To meet prospects, customers, fans and the public on the digital platforms where they spend their time, businesses are building their social media presence to reach and engage participants. Here's the numbers behind the...
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The History of Social Media | Digital Trends

The History of Social Media | Digital Trends | socialmedia_socialising | Scoop.it
Social networking didn't start with Facebook. We examine the history of social networking, from BBSes to Friendster to Diaspora.
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Computer-mediated communication - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Computer-mediated communication (CMC) is defined as any communicative transaction that occurs through the use of two or more networked computers.[1] While the term has traditionally referred to those communications that occur via computer-mediated formats (e.g., instant messaging, email, chat rooms), it has also been applied to other forms of text-based interaction such as text messaging.[2] Research on CMC focuses largely on the social effects of different computer-supported communication technologies. Many recent studies involve Internet-based social networking supported by social software.

Scholars from a variety of fields study phenomena that can be described under the umbrella term of CMC (see also Internet studies). For example, many take a sociopsychological approach to CMC by examining how humans use "computers" (or digital media) to manage interpersonal interaction, form impressions and form and maintain relationships.[3][4] These studies have often focused on the differences between online and offline interactions, though contemporary research is moving towards the view that CMC should be studied as embedded in everyday life .[5] Another branch of CMC research examines the use of paralinguistic features such as emoticons, pragmatic rules such as turn-taking[6] and the sequential analysis and organization of talk,[7][8] and the various sociolects, styles, registers or sets of terminology specific to these environments (see Leet). The study of language in these contexts is typically based on text-based forms of CMC, and is sometimes referred to as "computer-mediated discourse analysis".[9]

The way humans communicate in professional, social, and educational settings varies widely, depending upon not only the environment but also the method of communication in which the communication occurs, which in this case is through computers or other information and computer technologies (ICTs). The study of communication to achieve collaboration—common work products—is termed computer-supported collaboration and includes only some of the concerns of other forms of CMC research.

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Tacit knowledge - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Tacit knowledge (as opposed to formal or explicit knowledge) is the kind of knowledge that is difficult to transfer to another person by means of writing it down or verbalising it. For example, stating to someone that London is in the United Kingdom is a piece of explicit knowledge that can be written down, transmitted, and understood by a recipient. However, the ability to speak a language, use algebra,[1] or design and use complex equipment requires all sorts of knowledge that is not always known explicitly, even by expert practitioners, and which is difficult to explicitly transfer to users.

While tacit knowledge appears to be simple, it has far reaching consequences and is not widely understood.

The term “tacit knowing” or “tacit knowledge” was first introduced into philosophy by Michael Polanyi in 1958 in his magnum opus Personal Knowledge. He famously introduces the idea in his later work The Tacit Dimension with the assertion that “we can know more than we can tell.”.[2] According to him, not only is there knowledge that cannot be adequately articulated by verbal means, but also all knowledge is rooted in tacit knowledge in the strong sense of that term.

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Social Lives Online versus Offline: Finding the Right Balance

Social Lives Online versus Offline: Finding the Right Balance | socialmedia_socialising | Scoop.it
Before we had the Internet, the closest form of written communication we had were handwritten letters posted to family, friends and pen pals. Then there are the regular phone calls, family reunion meet-ups, parties, events etc.
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Column: Facebook can't replace face-to-face conversation

Column: Facebook can't replace face-to-face conversation | socialmedia_socialising | Scoop.it
Ed Keller and Brad Fay: Social media has given Americans ways to keep in touch, but are unsatisfactory alternative to personal contact.
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Yazino | ‘Sofalising’ the new Socialising?

Yazino | ‘Sofalising’ the new Socialising? | socialmedia_socialising | Scoop.it
Yazino the world's first online social casino and Opinium research have today released new research that reveals: More than a quarter (26%) of people spend more time communicating with friends online than in personOne in 10 (11%) adults is more likely...
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