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How can social media help Family Medicine?

How can social media help Family Medicine? | Social Touch | Scoop.it

I was thumbing through my issue of Family Medicine (the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine's journal) last week when I came across "Twitter Use at a Family Medicine Conference: analyzing #STFM13." I knew that this article was on its way; its lead author, Dr. Ranit Mishori, had contacted me to ask for some of my thoughts about using Twitter at conferences several months ago.

The study authors examined every tweet with the #STFM13 hashtagrelated to the 2013 Annual STFM conference from 3 days prior to the conference, during the conference, and for 3 days after the conference. They found that nearly 70% of the tweets were directly related to session content, about 14% were more social, and the remainder related to logistics and advertising. They also grouped the top reasons attendees gave for tweeting into four categories: information sharing, networking and connectedness, advocacy, and note taking.

Several of my comments made their way into the article about why I tweet at conferences. Tweeting allows me to simultaneously take notes and share interesting facts with the Twitter-verse. It's easy to read through my tweets when I get home and review what I learned along with the action steps I need to take. I also enjoy the dialogue and camaraderie that happens during the conference on Twitter; it's great to respond to other people's comments and factoids as well as see their responses to mine. By enabling supportive, meaningful dialogue among conference attendees, Twitter helps us to engage more deeply with the conference content.

Upon reading the article, I saw my Twitter handle (@SingingPenDrJen) named as the top tweeter for the conference. I was both a little proud and a little dismayed; it's nice to be an "influencer," but maybe I'm tweeting too much? Outside of what the article terms "social" tweets (which are not the majority of my tweets), I try to only tweet session content that is new, insightful, and/or practice changing. I'll definitely be more mindful of what I tweet at the next conference I attend.

Only a small percentage of STFM 2013 conference attendees were on Twitter; just 13% of conference attendees tweeted at least once, and over half of the total number of tweets were sent by 10 people. Many of the people sitting next to me in conference sessions asked me about tweeting and why I do it. When I offered to assist them with getting on Twitter, most politely declined, usually with comments about "I don't have the time" and the how intimidating new technology is ("I can't even figure out my EHR!" one person said).

I'd love to see more family docs on Twitter and other social media sites, but I'm not sure how realistic that is. From 2012 to 2013, the number of tweeters at the STFM conference didn't budge much. The diffusion of innovations theory postulates that a critical mass of early adopters have to embrace a change before the majority will follow suit; are we still waiting for that critical mass, or will this particular theory end up not applying to family docs and Twitter, with a significant number of docs not ever using it?

Spreading the word about the positives of an online presence may be a step in the right direction. A recent article in Family Practice Management reviews several social media platforms and discusses benefits of having a robust online presence. The article describes using social media to provide office updates and patient education. Perhaps equally valuable is proactively managing your online presence, so that patients see more than just third-party website patient reviews of you when they put your name into a search engine. At the end of the article is a list of simple, practical starting points for getting online in ways that benefit both patients and docs.

I hope to see more articles exploring how we as family docs connect and communicate online. The AFP social media presence -- with Facebook,Twitter, and the Community Blog -- provides a great way to engage with both our content and family docs in general. Keep the replies, retweets, and Facebook posts coming!
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Rescooped by Ceren Gülpınar from Digital marketing pharma
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Here's Looking at You: How Personal Health Information Is Being Tracked and Used - CHCF.org

People who use cell phones, credit cards, websites, store coupons, and medical devices leave a trail of data that are often harnessed by third parties, sometimes without consumers' knowledge.

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Healthcare and Pharma Digital Spend Rises, but Outlays Stay Low

Healthcare and Pharma Digital Spend Rises, but Outlays Stay Low | Social Touch | Scoop.it

The US healthcare and pharmaceutical industry will spend $1.18 billion this year on paid digital ads, according to a new eMarketer report.


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What Works Best For Measuring Marketing Impact? Top-Down, Bottom-Up Or ... - Marketing Land

What Works Best For Measuring Marketing Impact? Top-Down, Bottom-Up Or ... - Marketing Land | Social Touch | Scoop.it

What Works Best For Measuring Marketing Impact? Top-Down, Bottom-Up Or ...


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I’d Never Admit That to My Doctor. But to a Computer? Sure

I’d Never Admit That to My Doctor. But to a Computer? Sure | Social Touch | Scoop.it
New research finds patients are more likely to respond honestly to personal questions when talking to a virtual human.

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Rescooped by Ceren Gülpınar from Social Media and Healthcare
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How Pharmaceutical Firms Are Using Social Media to Speak to Patients

How Pharmaceutical Firms Are Using Social Media to Speak to Patients | Social Touch | Scoop.it

Historically, the pharmaceutical industry has been a little slow on the uptake when it comes to the adoption of online marketing. But things are changing. In particular, pharma companies are embracing social media as they seek new, effective ways of helping the people using their products gain valuable information and, in turn, build their brand.

Much of the reason for this is that people have become digitally-savvy, as well as digitally-demanding. Research by the Pew Internet & American Life Project, for example, shows that 80% of internet users in the USA – about 93 million Americans – have searched for a health-related topic online.

There is a wealth of healthcare information available on the web. Whether it is reliable or not is open to debate; nevertheless, the research demonstrates just how important the internet is in the sphere of healthcare.

Into this space steps the pharmaceutical firm. Increasingly, drug manufacturers and healthcare providers are moving social media to the centre stage of their business models as they come to recognise its power in engaging patients.

A new report from the IMS Institute for Healthcare Informatics, one of the most wide-ranging analyses of the social media activities of some of the largest pharmaceutical brands, shows that nearly half of pharmaceutical manufacturers are now actively using social to engage with patients on healthcare-related topics.

Key findings:

Twenty-three of the top 50 pharmaceutical companies worldwide are now actively using social media – on Facebook, Twitter or YouTube – to engage with patientsBut only 10 are using all three services for healthcare-related topicsTwitter is used by 22 of the 50 companies studied, YouTube by 17 companies and Facebook by 15 companiesOf the ten pharmaceutical companies that were active across these three channels, Johnson & Johnson was ranked the bestThe overall level of engagement between pharmaceutical companies and patients has steadily increased over the past yearWikipedia is the single leading source of medical information for patients and healthcare professionals

‘Relevant, accurate content’

“Increasingly, patients are turning to social media as an essential forum for obtaining and sharing information related to their health,” explained Murray Aitken, IMS executive director.

“This trend only heightens the need for relevant, accurate content that can be accessed and used throughout the patient journey. Healthcare professionals, regulators and pharmaceutical manufacturers all need to acknowledge the vital role they can and should play as participants in the healthcare conversation.”

Tips for pharma firms starting out on social mediaStart with strategy

A plan of action is crucial to any social media activity. Start by defining your goals. What do you want to do on social? What do you want to accomplish?

Be human – tell stories

Health is a human issue, so offer stories on social media that engage with people. This could be links to case studies, personal blogs or interviews with experts.

Consider translated content

The most successful pharmaceutical companies are global ones. If you are expanding into new markets, consider offering translated social media content to effectively communicate with your new customers.

Pay attention to regulations

Remember that there are restrictions governing the type of marketing activity pharmaceutical companies can offer. Ensure you are up-to-date with regulations.

Start to review and audit

As your social media activity develops, it is crucial that you measure its success. Start analysing your content – see what works and what doesn’t, and make any necessary changes.

 


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Rescooped by Ceren Gülpınar from Social Media and Healthcare
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Study says health policy researchers steer clear of social media

Study says health policy researchers steer clear of social media | Social Touch | Scoop.it

In  the conglomerate of voices dominating people's Twitter feeds, health policy researchers lack a distinct presence.

Health policy researchers are reluctant to tap into social media to spread their findings, according to a recent Penn study. Moreover, their reluctance stems from a lack of confidence in web outlets.

“We were surprised by the level of nervousness and anxiety in engaging in social media as researchers, “ Assistant professor of medicine David Grande said. “Many were worried that using social media could get them in trouble in some ways, and even cause their findings to be confused or misinterpreted.”

Grande and assistant professor of medicine Zachary Meisel, led a team of researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine in investigating why health policy researchers are so reluctant to use social media channels. The team surveyed 215 researchers, mostly M.D. ’s and Ph.D. ’s.

According to Grande — who is also co-director of policy at the Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics — the team was interested by the disconnect in communication in American healthcare. They figured that social media could play an important role in improving communication regarding health policy.

The research team was not surprised by their findings — in fact, they expected very few of the survey participants to engage in social media based on their personal experiences in the field.

“Broadly speaking, traditional academic publications and journals are the most valued in academia,” Grande said. “The highest measure of success in the field is how many times an article is cited in other articles. Researchers are already reluctant to use other forms of dissemination to other audiences, and social media is even further out from traditional media, bringing an even higher risk.”

Nevertheless, Grande and his team did not hesitate to use social media to share their discovery. They took full advantage of the web by creating a blog post about the article they published in Health Affairs. 

They even took their findings to Twitter, tweeting links to both the original article and the blog post.

 


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Rescooped by Ceren Gülpınar from Digital Health
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Mobile game developer uses avatars to take on cyberbullying, eating disorders in teens

Mobile game developer uses avatars to take on cyberbullying, eating disorders in teens | Social Touch | Scoop.it

Pixelberry Studios, developer of the mobile game High School Story, is working with National Eating Disorder Association to address eating disorders in teens. If the fictional character has experiences and/or qualities that the reader or viewer can relate to, they can form a type of bond with that character,” she said. “This leads to greater self-reflection because they’re able to look at the character’s experiences from a different perspective, and then reflect back on their own thoughts and feelings.”


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Rescooped by Ceren Gülpınar from Digital Health & Pharma
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There's Now An 'Instagram For Doctors'

There's Now An 'Instagram For Doctors' | Social Touch | Scoop.it
Now they can actually visualize different diseases and abnormalities.

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Rescooped by Ceren Gülpınar from Digital marketing pharma
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How can Pharma organize for agility in the digital age?

How can Pharma organize for agility in the digital age? | Social Touch | Scoop.it

As pharma and healthcare companies embrace the need for digital transformation, how can they ensure that they are set up for success?


Via Olivier Delannoy
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Social media in health information and communication: a content analysis of Facebook groups related to hypertension.

Studies on the utilisation of social media sites for health related information and communication are still limited. We conducted a content analysis of the Facebook groups related to hypertension by searching Facebook (www.facebook.com). We identified 187 hypertension-related Facebook groups containing a total of 8,966 members. Majority of the groups were formed to create awareness regarding hypertension-related diseases, and to provide supports to the affected patients and caregivers. Facebook has a great potentiality to be utilised as a popular and useful platform for health information and communication purposes in order to build up a better global health.

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Rescooped by Ceren Gülpınar from Pharma Marketing
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Demystifying Multichannel Marketing in Pharma

Demystifying Multichannel Marketing in Pharma | Social Touch | Scoop.it
Download our free eBook titled Demystifying multichannel marketing marketing in pharma.

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Rescooped by Ceren Gülpınar from healthcare technology
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Software Spots Sensitive Traces in Health Records

Software Spots Sensitive Traces in Health Records | Social Touch | Scoop.it

New software could give people greater control over how their personal health information is shared between doctors and medical institutions—provided that enough health providers decide to use the system.

 

Today a patient’s data typically stays within a hospital group or doctor’s practice. If you get care elsewhere you are essentially a blank slate unless a special request for your data is made, in which case the entire record becomes accessible. But many patients may not want their entire medical history to be accessible by everyone they see, so there is pressure to develop tools that can be used to limit access. One tricky issue is that redacting details of a diagnosis may not remove all the clues as to that condition, such as prescribed drugs or lab tests.

 

A new tool developed by computer scientists at the University of Illinois can figure out which parts of a record may inadvertently reveal aspects of a patient’s medical history. The idea is that as data-sharing proposals advance, the patient would decide what parts of his or her record to keep private. A clinician would get advice from the technology on how to amend the record to ensure that this occurs.

 

The software bases its recommendations on a machine-learning analysis of many other medical records. This reveals what details could be associated with things like mental health episodes, past drug abuse, or a diagnosis of a sexually transmitted disease when the record is shared with another hospital or doctor. The tool could eventually automatically remove those additional details to keep that information confidential.

 

 more at http://www.technologyreview.com/news/528576/can-software-make-health-data-more-private/ ;

 

 

 

 

 


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'Inframundo de Athan' is an entertaining journey to the underworld Amusement ... - Tico Times

'Inframundo de Athan' is an entertaining journey to the underworld Amusement ... - Tico Times | Social Touch | Scoop.it
'Inframundo de Athan' is an entertaining journey to the underworld Amusement ...
Tico Times
It's like a healthcare system designed by Willy Wonka. “Would you like the regular pass or the special pass?
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Rescooped by Ceren Gülpınar from Social Media and Healthcare
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What Medical Students Should Know about Social Media

What Medical Students Should Know about Social Media | Social Touch | Scoop.it

Nothing has revolutionized communication over the past few decades like social media. Not only has it changed the way friends meet and stay in touch, it's also changed the way prestigious schools choose students and the way hospitals and other medical services providers choose new hires. So, it's important that both prospective and current medical students understand what's at stake each time they post on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram or other social media sites.

Consider the statistics affecting prospective students applying for acceptance to prestigious medical schools. In deciding whether to accept particular applicants:

32 percent of medical school admissions departments report they've Googled an applicant to learn more about them; 22 percent say they have visited an applicant’s social networking site; 42% say they found something that negatively impacted a student's chances of being accepted.

But the potential online scrutiny doesn't stop with your medical school acceptance letter. Your web presence can follow you into your internship and post-graduate job searches too. According to a recent survey of more than 1,000 job recruiters:

92 percent of respondents use social media when sourcing job talent;93 percent of respondents use LinkedIn;66 percent use Facebook;And 54 percent use Twitter in their search for qualified candidates.

And 40 percent of medical hiring professionals say they browse the social media profiles of candidates applying for jobs as physicians, nurses and other healthcare workers.

To protect your online reputation and assure that your social media presence doesn't sink your chances of getting accepted to the medical school of your choice or landing a great position after graduation, WOLFPACC offers these tips:

If you have a social media account, use it. If your profile hasn't been updated in months, it may seem suspicious; That said, watch the "TMI" (too much information) factor. Avoid posting details of your latest family or relationship drama or a dozen photos of yourself, alcoholic beverage in hand, partying it up with friends. You won't be taken seriously; Avoid highly-charged political or religious issues. You never know what parties, faiths or opinions are held by those with the power to decide your educational and professional future; Don't cuss. It's simply unprofessional;Watch the online groups you join and the hashtags you post. Seeing "Things I Hate About my Professor" among your list of online groups, or hashtags like #myjobsucks in your posts and comments will certainly send a negative message; Mind the details. If you maintain profiles on multiple social media sites or professional online forums, be consistent with information like job titles and durations. And double check spelling, grammar and sentence structure.

Remember that online reputations tend to last. That momentary lapse of judgment at the keyboard can spread quickly and it's nearly impossible to erase all traces. Begin now to protect your chances of making the future you're envisioning a reality.


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Review: LG Lifeband Touch and Samsung Gear Fit

Review: LG Lifeband Touch and Samsung Gear Fit | Social Touch | Scoop.it

New wearable devices track activities, vital statistics and then some, in combination with apps. But is it enough to justify their price? 

 

Take the LG Life-band Touch and the Samsung Gear Fit. These new devices, both released this spring, combine smartwatch features like providing the time, fitness tracking and notifications of incoming calls and texts with bigger and more interactive displays.

They are gadgets that do a bit of everything but excel at nothing. And they face exceptional consumer skepticism.


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Therapists are turning to the web to help revolutionize mental health treatments

Therapists are turning to the web to help revolutionize mental health treatments | Social Touch | Scoop.it

We all know how effective the talking cure can be, but for many people, carving the time out of their schedule to meet a psychotherapist can be impossible, not to mention daunting. Services like Pretty Padded Room have sprung up to provide a solution to these problems, offering secure video chats with mental health professionals as an on-demand service. In a report by NPR, a 24-year-old entrepreneur reveals that, rather than the confrontational setting we imagine, a spot of online therapy is more akin to "Skyping with a friend."


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Online Therapist's curator insight, May 6, 2015 1:59 PM
Learn more about Online Mindfulness Therapy for the treatment of Anxiety and Depression: http://www.counselingtherapyonline.com.Visit my YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/pdmstrong.
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The Convergence of Big Data and EHR Infographic

The Convergence of Big Data and EHR Infographic | Social Touch | Scoop.it

“In the next 10 years, data science and software will do more for medicine than all of the biological sciences together,” said venture capitalist Vinod Khosla.


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Laurent FLOURET's curator insight, July 3, 2014 5:59 AM

A few interesting stats in here...