Social Studies Stuff
220 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Benjamin La Framboise from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Sea Level Rise Swallows 5 Whole Pacific Islands

Sea Level Rise Swallows 5 Whole Pacific Islands | Social Studies Stuff | Scoop.it
Evidence confirms dramatic climate change effects in the Solomon Islands

 

Sea-level rise, erosion and coastal flooding are some of the greatest challenges facing humanity from climate change. Recently at least five reef islands in the remote Solomon Islands have been lost completely to sea-level rise and coastal erosion, and a further six islands have been severely eroded.

 

These islands lost to the sea range in size from one to five hectares. They supported dense tropical vegetation that was at least 300 years old. Nuatambu Island, home to 25 families, has lost more than half of its habitable area, with 11 houses washed into the sea since 2011.

 

This is the first scientific evidence, published in Environmental Research Letters, that confirms the numerous anecdotal accounts from across the Pacific of the dramatic impacts of climate change on coastlines and people.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Benjamin La Framboise from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Aerial Photos of Iceland Volcanic Rivers

Aerial Photos of Iceland Volcanic Rivers | Social Studies Stuff | Scoop.it

On occasion, we are reminded of how utterly captivating and gorgeous nature is, its visual poetry surrounds us. It just takes a step back, a shift in perspective, to realize how amazing the constructs of this planet are; it’s a beautiful constant balance between order and entropy. Case in point, what appears to be well-crafted, intricate abstract paintings, or works of art, are in reality, mindblowing aerial images of Iceland."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 25, 2016 1:32 PM

Andre Ermolaev, through his photography has captured the beauty of Iceland's geomorphology.  Being on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, Iceland has abundant volcanic ash which adds rich color to the fluvial systems.  

 

Tags: geomorphology, physical, Europe, fluvial, water, landforms, images.

Joaquín del Val's curator insight, May 27, 2016 1:20 PM
Espectaculares imágenes de canales fluviales en Islandia
Rescooped by Benjamin La Framboise from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

From megacity to metacity

From megacity to metacity | Social Studies Stuff | Scoop.it

In 1950, there were only two megacities, London and New York, with populations of more than 10m. In 2010, Tokyo was top of the list of the world’s largest cities, New York was only just scraping into the top 10, and London had dropped off the bottom. New York will join it in megacity oblivion in less than a decade and, with the exception of Tokyo, every other megacity will be in what is referred to as the 'global south'. To earn a place in the top 10, cities will soon need to boast a population of 20m or more. This is a new breed of city – the metacity."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 12, 2016 2:24 PM

The term megacity (a city with a population greater than 10 million) has been around for a while and there wasn't much linguistic need to describe something bigger.  Today, most megacities are more like Lagos and Mumbai, places of extreme wealth asymmetries than the global cities of New York City and London.  Some are now using the term metacity to describe cities with populations of 20 million.  Asian metacities are a good place to start thinking about the largest urban regions that are increasingly dominating economic, political and cultural affairs.      

 

Tags: urbanmegacities, unit 7 citiesEast Asia.

Rescooped by Benjamin La Framboise from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Superblocks to the rescue: Barcelona’s plan to give streets back to residents

Superblocks to the rescue: Barcelona’s plan to give streets back to residents | Social Studies Stuff | Scoop.it

"The Catalan capital’s radical new strategy will restrict traffic to a number of big roads, drastically reducing pollution and turning secondary streets into ‘citizen spaces’ for culture, leisure and the community.  Black routes allow public transport and cars at 50km/h, while green routes only allow private vehicles at 10km/h to prioritize pedestrians and cycling."

 

Tags: Catalonia, Spain, mobility, transportation, place, neighborhood, urban, planning, urbanism.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Scooped by Benjamin La Framboise
Scoop.it!

Use The Trick or Treat Test Tonight To Find Good Urban Design

Use The Trick or Treat Test Tonight To Find Good Urban Design | Social Studies Stuff | Scoop.it
Can kids find your front door? Is it safe for them be be out?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Benjamin La Framboise
Scoop.it!

10 Ways Your Local School Board Impacts Your Life

10 Ways Your Local School Board Impacts Your Life | Social Studies Stuff | Scoop.it
Do you know the names of your school board members? Well, you should. These publicly elected officials impact your and your kids’ lives more than you may think.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Benjamin La Framboise
Scoop.it!

False Flag Alien Event - Don't Fall For It When It Happens!

Collection of clips and evidence regarding the coming staged false flag alien event.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Benjamin La Framboise
Scoop.it!

Youth sport chief calls for specialist PE teacher in every primary school

Youth sport chief calls for specialist PE teacher in every primary school | Social Studies Stuff | Scoop.it
Many teachers nervous about giving PE lessons, says charity leader, as Michael Gove prepares for talks with sports bodies (RT @GuardianEdu: RT @GuardianEdu: Youth sport chief calls for specialist PE teacher in every primary school
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Benjamin La Framboise
Scoop.it!

Analysis: Drought to cause food price spike but not inflation

Analysis: Drought to cause food price spike but not inflation | Social Studies Stuff | Scoop.it
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Americans face higher food prices at the supermarket because of a drought this summer, but the increase will not have a lasting impact on inflation or the Federal Reserve's thinking (Reuters: Analysis: Drought to cause food ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Benjamin La Framboise
Scoop.it!

14 Die After Overcrowded, Immigrant-Carrying Truck Crashes Near Texas Border

14 Die After Overcrowded, Immigrant-Carrying Truck Crashes Near Texas Border | Social Studies Stuff | Scoop.it
Fourteen die after overcrowded truck carrying undocumented immigrants crashes into tree. ...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Benjamin La Framboise from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Computer Simulation: How An 8.0 Earthquake Would Rock Los Angeles

Computer Simulation: How An 8.0 Earthquake Would Rock Los Angeles | Social Studies Stuff | Scoop.it

Earlier this week, an expert from the Southern California Earthquake Center spoke at a conference in Long Beach and called the southern San Andreas fault "locked, loaded and ready to go" for a major 'quake. He said that people should be preparing for something around a magnitude 8.0—that's larger than the devastating San Francisco earthquake back in 1906, the LA Times notes, and that one caused about 3,000 deaths from both the shaking and the fires that followed (which LA's former earthquake czar Lucy Jones has said we should be worried about).

 

What would an earthquake that big even look like? How would it move and where could we expect the shaking to be felt? For that, there's a video from the SCEC that shows where the movement would occur and how far away it could be felt in the event of a 'quake that starts near San Luis Obispo and moves south along the fault.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Benjamin La Framboise from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Aerofarm has built the world's largest vertical farm

Aerofarm has built the world's largest vertical farm | Social Studies Stuff | Scoop.it

AeroFarms' headquarters in Newark, New Jersey, is a former steel factory that's been converted into the world's largest vertical farm. Throughout the 6,410m2 of growing space, plant beds are stacked on top of each other in 12 layers between floor and ceiling. LEDs provide lighting and the roots of leafy greens, herbs and salads are kept nourished using an "aeroponic" mist claimed to use 95 per cent less water than outdoor agriculture.

 

"This is game-changing in terms of productivity," explains Marc Oshima, AeroFarms' co-founder. "We can take the same seed that might take 30-35 days to grow outside, and it will have a 12-16 day crop cycle in our system, so we can have 20 crop cycles a year." 

 

AeroFarms' agricultural optimisation relies on algorithms that continually monitor nutrients and lighting at different points in the plants' growth cycles. By optimising light wavelengths and the nutrient-filled mist, operators can endow plants with different tastes, textures, colours and yield. "For example, we can make watercress spicier and lettuce sweeter," he says.

 

“Our mission is to build farms in cities all over the world,” Rosenberg recently told The Huffington Post. “We are very much building the infrastructure not to build one, two or three farms but to build 20, 30 or 50 farms.”

 

Indoors farming has long been touted as a way to address two major problems. The first is macro-level and lofty: How will we, the Earth’s 7.4 billion (and counting) humans, go about feeding ourselves in a changing world? The second is more immediate: How do you get fresh, healthy produce to people in urban food deserts, where diet-related conditions like diabetes and obesity run rampant?

 

The answers to those questions could be a gold mine. By 2050, the world’s population is projected to rise to between 9 billion and 10 billion people. Those numbers, coupled with income growth across the world, could result in more than a 70 percent increase in demand for food by that year, according to a report by the World Bank. Making matters worse, the unpredictable and increasingly extreme weather, droughts and flooding that come of climate change are expected to grow more intense in the coming decades, as greenhouse gas emissions continue to warm the planet.

 

The flagship facility, in partnership with RBH, Prudential and Goldman Sachs, will be able to produce 900,000kg of vegetables -- which will be distributed to local buyers -- annually when it reaches full capacity, predicted for midway through 2016.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
Zhenchuan Ma's comment, May 11, 2016 9:09 PM
Very good! It's the direction of future farm.
Rescooped by Benjamin La Framboise from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

India to 'divert rivers' to tackle drought

India to 'divert rivers' to tackle drought | Social Studies Stuff | Scoop.it
India is to divert water from major rivers like the Brahmaputra and the Ganges to deal with severe drought, a senior minister tells the BBC.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Richard Aitchison's curator insight, March 22, 1:07 PM
As everyone knows, water is key. We usually talk about water in geography has a way to export/import or for key military purposes. Here we are talking about survival and certain states within in India (29 to be exact) that were suffering through a drought and whose rivers had been completely dried up. India has tried a new plan to try to get water to these areas, by diverting water from there other rivers to these states. This is an interesting way to try to deal with this problem, however is it really feasible to do this?  Would this eventually causes problems in the areas in which we are taking the water from? Also this would be very expensive and India , who is still a growing country,  could hurt them economically for years to come. No one has said this will work and while yes, its horrible to see what has happen to these areas, but is this just a quick fix. What would the plan be for a future drought, is there anyway to come up with a better plan? Possibly will these people need to move in the future. Our rivers and lands are constantly changing so as people we might have to move away from areas that which were once habitable, but now may not be. 
Douglas Vance's curator insight, April 23, 12:26 PM
Extreme drought combined with inefficient agricultural practices and the depletion of groundwater resources have creates a water crisis in India. However the solution to the drought seems poorly planned and likely to fail. There is no evidence showing that a massive water diversion project like this will succeed in alleviating the effects of such a massive drought. 
brielle blais's curator insight, May 1, 6:45 PM
Drought is a factor of the physical geography of an area that is in trouble. India is heavily depended on monsoon rains, and for two years have no received what they normally do, and 330 million people are affected by it. The country is planning to divert different rivers to solve the issue. "The government says the scheme will irrigate 35,000 hectares of land and generate 34,000 megawatts of electricity." This will exponentially help those dealing with the water crisis, but also help with other thing such as electricity. 
Scooped by Benjamin La Framboise
Scoop.it!

Micro-dwellings: Part of the solution or just more problems?

Micro-dwellings: Part of the solution or just more problems? | Social Studies Stuff | Scoop.it
How do micro-dwellings effect the demographic and political structure of major cities? (Micro-dwellings: Part of the solution or just more problems?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Benjamin La Framboise
Scoop.it!

Twitter / EcoInteractive: Vision 2030 - Make it Happen ...

RT @EcoInteractive: Vision 2030 - Make it Happen ~ #environment #sustainability #greenroofs http://t.co/McDV0xov...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Benjamin La Framboise
Scoop.it!

Communities have the right to protect public health and safety--even when it comes to fracking | Amy Mall's Blog | Switchboard, from NRDC

Communities have the right to protect public health and safety--even when it comes to fracking | Amy Mall's Blog | Switchboard, from NRDC | Social Studies Stuff | Scoop.it
The state of Colorado is suing a local government that wants to protect its citizens from the harms of fracking. Does this sit well with anyone? The state is even opposed to a local government requiring water quality testing for families...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Benjamin La Framboise
Scoop.it!

Education chief wants textbooks to become obsolete

Education chief wants textbooks to become obsolete | Social Studies Stuff | Scoop.it
Worried your kids spend too much time with their faces buried in a computer screen? Their schoolwork may soon depend on it.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Benjamin La Framboise
Scoop.it!

GAMES: Play multiple Flash games themed around global issues! | Global Solutions

GAMES: Play multiple Flash games themed around global issues! | Global Solutions | Social Studies Stuff | Scoop.it

Play quick and easy games related to global issues.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Benjamin La Framboise
Scoop.it!

Smart Gorilla Youngsters Thwart Crafty Poachers By Dismantling Snares

Smart Gorilla Youngsters Thwart Crafty Poachers By Dismantling Snares | Social Studies Stuff | Scoop.it
No matter how hard conservationists try, there is always some ruthless poacher out there to kill animals regardless of how close they are to becoming extinct.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Benjamin La Framboise
Scoop.it!

US Poverty Rising to Record Levels

US Poverty Rising to Record Levels | Social Studies Stuff | Scoop.it
US poverty on track to reach 46-year high; suburbs, underemployed workers, children hit hard...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Benjamin La Framboise
Scoop.it!

Talk of 'cure' at historic AIDS conference - CNN.com

Talk of 'cure' at historic AIDS conference - CNN.com | Social Studies Stuff | Scoop.it
This week, the world's largest gathering of AIDS doctors and experts is converging on Washington for the 19th International AIDS Conference.
more...
No comment yet.