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Why geography matters now more than ever

Why geography matters now more than ever | Social Studies Resources | Scoop.it

"Students need to know human geography; they need to understand the relationships that exist between cultures."


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LRC's curator insight, September 4, 2017 6:08 PM
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Ivan Ius's curator insight, September 5, 2017 11:38 AM
Geographic concepts: Patterns & Trends; Interrelationships; Geographic Perpsective
Uart.com's curator insight, September 8, 2017 5:22 AM

Geography is more important than ever to explain and understand the art market in globalization and digitization turn.

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Ship to shore: tracking the maritime motorways

Ship to shore: tracking the maritime motorways | Social Studies Resources | Scoop.it

"It is estimated that 97 per cent of all trade – the things we buy in shops – will have been transported in containers by ships at sea. The container vessel, stacked high with uniformly-sized metal boxes, has become a symbol of our globalized world. This is a world of imports and exports, a world where moving things across huge distances keeps the price of daily commodities low as items are manufactured in one place, then packaged in another, before arriving on the shores where they will eventually be sold. In recent geographical literature, attention has turned to the world at sea – a space traditionally overlooked. Geography means ‘Earth-writing’ and geographers have taken the origins of the term very seriously. They have written primarily about the Earth: the ground, the soil, the land. The sea is something ‘out there’ – seemingly disconnected from our everyday lives. However, an appreciation of the world as made from flows and connections has enabled geography to recognize that the sea is essential to our landed life." http://wp.me/p2Ij6x-5DS

 

Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.


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Ivan Ius's curator insight, February 19, 2017 3:38 PM
Geographic Concepts: Patterns and Trends, Geographic Perspective, Interrelationships
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Mapping the World's Migration Flows

Mapping the World's Migration Flows | Social Studies Resources | Scoop.it
Visualizing the flow of the world's migrants from country to country.

 

Based on data from the U.N. Population Division, this map shows the estimated net migration (inflows minus outflows) by origin and destination country between 2010 and 2015.

Blue circles = positive net migration (more inflows). Red circles = negative net migration (more outflows). Each yellow dot represents 1,000 people.

Hover over a circle to see that country’s total net migration between 2010 and 2015. Click a circle to view only the migration flows in and out of that country.

For more info about this map, read the article, All the World’s Immigration Visualized in 1 Map.

 

Tags: migration, USA, mapping, population, unit 2 population.


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Ivan Ius's curator insight, December 13, 2016 8:33 PM
Geography Concept Focus: Patterns and Trends
Leah Goyer's curator insight, December 14, 2016 1:30 PM
What a fascinating view.
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, December 17, 2016 11:46 PM

Migration at a global scale changes places 

 

Syllabus

Students investigate reasons for and effects of internal migration in Australia and another country, for example: 

  • analysis of trends in temporary and permanent internal migration
  • discussion of economic, social or environmental consequences of internal migration on places of origin and destination

Students investigate the reasons for and effects of international migration to Australia, for example: 

  • analysis of international migration patterns 
  • explanation of where and why international migrants settle within Australia 
  • examination of characteristics and spatial patterns of Australia’s cultural diversity 

Geoworld 9 NSW
Chapter 8: Migration changes Australia and the USA

8.1 Migration: people own the move

8.2 Australia: destination nation

8.3 Where do immigrants settle

8.4 Culturally diverse australia: trends in migration

 

8.8 Australians are mobile people

8.9 Mobile indigenous populations

8.19 Lifestyle migration

8.11 The power of resources: the Pilbara

8.12 Migration changes the USA

Geothink 

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27 stunning satellite images that will change how you see our world - Geoawesomeness

27 stunning satellite images that will change how you see our world - Geoawesomeness | Social Studies Resources | Scoop.it

"The images come from the amazing book called “Overview: A New Perspective of Earth”. that just hit the stores around the world. The book is a stunning and unique collection of satellite images of Earth that offer an unexpected look at humanity, derived from the wildly popular Daily Overview Instagram account followed by almost 0.5 million people."

 

Hagadera, seen here on the right, is the largest section of the Dadaab Refugee Camp in Northern Kenya and is home to 100,000 refugees. To cope with the growing number of displaced Somalis arriving at Dadaab, the UN has begun moving people into a new area called the LFO extension, seen here on the left. Dadaab is the largest refugee camp in the world with an estimated total population of 400,000.


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This is where your smartphone battery begins

This is where your smartphone battery begins | Social Studies Resources | Scoop.it
Workers, including children, labor in harsh and dangerous conditions to meet the world’s soaring demand for cobalt, a mineral essential to powering electric vehicles, laptops, and smartphones, according to an investigation by The Washington Post.

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James Piccolino's curator insight, March 24, 10:21 AM
As sad as this is, what I think is more sad is that I have to admit when I first saw this headline while scrolling my initial thought was "Oh yeah, I need to buy a new phone battery". I think this says a lot about the differences in culture and priorities of those cultures. We in further developed countries do tend to take things for granted. There are things we get and throw away in a day that some in far off lands spend days to even obtain, with their lives sometimes depending on it.
David G Tibbs's curator insight, March 29, 3:36 PM
We take the luxuries that we have for granite and forget where it comes from, or who pays the physical price for us to have them. One example is electronics and the Congo. The Congo is a country filled with Colbolt which is critical to lithium batteries which powers majority of products that are rechargeable. The price they pay is unsafe mining conditions, indecent wages, and environmental hazards to local communities. 60 percent of the cobalt used today comes from the Congo, and while some companies track it to make sure its "clean" some companies do not check its origins. In 2010 there was a push to add cobalt to a list of resources that come from the Congo to be from a militia free mine. Individual companies have started to be stricter about where they get their Cobalt it's still not mandatory under international law. However with the demand for cobalt is increasing due to more electric power styling for vehicles and other products. In order to meet these demands the cobalt will continue to come from abused people until companies or international law limits and outlines how to deal with the cobalt question.
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Douglas Vance's curator insight, April 21, 2:10 PM
Given the absurd amount of minerals present in the country, the Democratic Republic of the Congo should be basking in immeasurable wealth. However, as shown by this inetractive and enormously in-depth piece by the Washington Post, the country constantly struggles with child labor, water pollution, and widespread dangerous working condition because of the global demand for minerals like cobalt and copper. 
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Maps have ‘north’ at the top, but it could’ve been different

Maps have ‘north’ at the top, but it could’ve been different | Social Studies Resources | Scoop.it
Why are almost all modern maps the same way up? Caroline Williams explores the intriguing history – and how it sways our psychology.

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If The World Were 100 People

If the population of the world was only 100 people, what would society look like? How many people would have shelter? Clean water? Education?

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Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this video attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to to a broader audience. The concept is simple, but the impact is profound.

 

Tags: statistics, development, perspective.

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Ella Price's curator insight, March 28, 2016 9:19 PM

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this video attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to to a broader audience. The concept is simple, but the impact is profound.

 

Tags: statistics, development, perspective.

MsPerry's curator insight, March 31, 2016 12:57 PM

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this video attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to to a broader audience. The concept is simple, but the impact is profound.

 

Tags: statistics, development, perspective.

Denise Klaves Stewardson's curator insight, April 1, 2016 4:06 PM

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this video attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to to a broader audience. The concept is simple, but the impact is profound.

 

Tags: statistics, development, perspective.

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How the states voted in every presidential election

The citizens of the United States have elected 44 presidents in 57 elections since the Constitution was adopted in 1789. Since the Civil War, presidential contests have been dominated by America's two major political parties – the Republicans and the Democrats. But over the last 150 years, state allegiance to these two parties has shifted greatly. Watch to see how the states voted in every presidential election since 1860.

 

Tags: electoral, mapping.


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Out of the Mouth of Babes...

Out of the Mouth of Babes... | Social Studies Resources | Scoop.it
Brielle, Ellen’s periodic table expert is back and now taking on world countries. Are you ready to learn a thing or two from this 4-year-old whiz? Stay tuned for more Brielle-iant episodes!

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 2, 2016 9:46 PM

If Ellen says she is awesome and adorable, it's because she's awesome and adorable. 

 

Tags: fun, trivia.

Elizabeth Engel's curator insight, February 3, 2016 2:08 PM

this little girl knows everything about the periodic table! she sure has a brain full of knowledge!

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Dam Collapse

Dam Collapse | Social Studies Resources | Scoop.it

"On November 5, 2015, two dams collapsed at an iron ore mine in southeastern Brazil. The dam is owned by Samarco, a joint-venture between the mining companies Vale and BHP Billiton. News outlets estimate that more than 62 million cubic meters of wastewater have been unleashed so far with catastrophic consequences. The immediate release of sludge wiped out numerous villages including Bento Rodrigues (shown in greater detail above), causing the death of twelve people. Eleven others are still missing. Because of this pollution, more than half a million people do not have access to clean water for drinking or irrigating their crops. By November 23, the contaminated waters covered a 400 mile stretch of the Rio Doce River and entered into the sea, killing significant amounts of planet and animal life along the way. Officials are concerned that the toxins will threaten the Comboios Nature Reserve, a protected area for the endangered leatherback turtle."

 

Tags: dam, environment, land use, sustainability, landscape, images, environment modify, pollution.


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Half of Canada’s population

Half of Canada’s population | Social Studies Resources | Scoop.it

"Half of Canada’s 33.5 million people live in the red part, the other in the yellow. More population divided maps (Source: reddit.com)"


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 2, 2015 3:58 PM

Land-wise, Canada one of the world's biggest countries, but population-wise, most of it is quite barren.  What geographic factors explain the population concentration and distribution in Canada?  


TagsCanada, map, North America.

JeanneSilvey's curator insight, November 17, 2015 10:09 AM

A great illustration of population concentration and high density in Urban centers. 4.6 million of the remaining 17 million (approx.) live in British Columbia.

 

Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 17, 2015 11:41 AM

First economically for trade routes you have the St. Lawrence river which was originally the most influential route for French explorers. You have Toronto the Canada's financial center which forms the core of the "Golden Horseshoe" region, which wraps around the western end of Lake Ontario, population wise a quarter of Canada's population lives here.  Politically it makes sense that government would be set up in that area because of the population in that area.  Which population leads to the social aspect because all activities of night life, restaurants, businesses, entertainment, malls, etc. are located in this area.  And lastly, it makes easy access for United States and Canada to exchange tourism and jobs and goods.

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World Religion Map

World Religion Map | Social Studies Resources | Scoop.it
The incredibly detailed map of the world's religions shows what the biggest religion is by census area in each country, along with its level of support.

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Madison Roth's curator insight, April 7, 2017 12:47 PM
This map relates to my human geography class because it shows the distribution of religion, and that is something my class is learning about. I think the distribution of religion is interesting to view because of the enormous level of diversity. Comparing the spread from origins of different religions to one another, the size along with the support it receives are even more actions one would practice.
Chris Rouse's curator insight, April 11, 2017 4:34 PM
This article is about the different religions around the world and what areas have the largest amount of supporters for a certain religion. This connects to our lessons because we learned about the different religions and where they are located.
Aaron Evans's curator insight, April 25, 2017 9:27 PM
There are many religions throughout the world. And it is interesting to see where the religions are distributed throughout regions. Christian is the biggest religion in the world, I was surprised to see the tiny bits of christian in Asia. It is an overall very detailed map.
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Dropping water levels reveal hidden church

Dropping water levels reveal hidden church | Social Studies Resources | Scoop.it
A 16th century church has emerged from the receding waters of the Nezahualcoyotl reservoir in the southern Mexican state of Chiapas. This is the second time water levels have dropped low enough to reveal the church since the reservoir was completed in 1966.

 

Tags: drought, Mexico, water, environment, religion, culture, Christianity,  colonialism, architecture, landscape.


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Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, February 13, 9:13 PM
In the Chiapas, Mexico there is a 16th century church that has been revealed due to the decrease in a reservoirs water level. This brief article is accompanied by pictures of the church that was abandoned in the 1770's do to the plague. According to the article, this is the second time the place of worship has been seen since 2002. 
Olivia Campanella's curator insight, September 19, 10:53 AM
This 16th century church first emerged from the waters of the Nezahualcoyotl reservoir in the Southern Mexican state of the Chiapas. And since the reservoir was completed in 1966 with the waters dropping low enough to reveal the church for the 2nd time. The waters have dropped low enough in 2002 for people to actually walk inside and stand on.
Kelvis Hernandez's curator insight, September 29, 11:53 PM
"You go in the cage, cage goes in the water, you go in the water. Churches in the water, our church." At least I am pretty sure that's how the line from Steven Speilberg's 1975 thriller "Churches". This 16th-century church just emerged from the nezahualcoyotl reservoir in Mexico which hasn't occurred since 2002. The temple of Santiago was built by monks who came to Mexico around the late 16th century, but it was ultimately abandoned after being hit by the plague in 1773-1776. The drought in the area caused the water level to drop 82 feet. This being the second time water levels have revealed the church, in 2002 visitors were able to walk into the temple itself. 
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City lights quiz: can you identify these world cities from space?

City lights quiz: can you identify these world cities from space? | Social Studies Resources | Scoop.it
Astronauts on the International Space Station took these images of cities at night. Note that up doesn’t necessarily mean north. All images: ESA/NASA

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 25, 2017 3:25 PM

I'm a sucker for online quizzes like this.  Here is another quiz that shows only the grid outlines of particular cities.  This isn't just about knowing a city, but also identifying regional and urban patterns.  What are some other fun trivia quizzes?  GeoGuessr is one of the more addictive quizzes  where 5 locations in GoogleMaps "StreetView" are shown and you have to guess where.  Smarty Pins is a fun game on Google Maps that tests players' geography and trivia skills.  In this Starbucks game you have to recognized the shape of the city, major street patterns and the economic patterns just to name a few (this is one way to make the urban model more relevant).  If you want quizzes with more direct applicability in the classroom, click here for online regional quizzes.         

 

Tags: urbanmodelsfun, trivia.

Ivan Ius's curator insight, March 28, 2017 8:44 AM
Geographic Thinking Concepts: Spatial Significance, Patterns and Trends
Alexander peters's curator insight, April 11, 2017 9:07 AM
The article was about identifying city lights from the sky. I think that it was fun to do and guess them.
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100 Great Teaching Images

100 Great Teaching Images | Social Studies Resources | Scoop.it

"Nature and humankind are both great artists, and when they join forces, amazing masterpieces can be produced. Today Bright Side has collected for you works in which the combined efforts of mother nature and photographic artists have captured magic moments showing the wondrous diversity of modern life and the natural world. Pictured above is the Westerdok District in Amsterdam."

 

Tags: images, art, landscape, worldwide.


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Mireia Civís Zaragoza's curator insight, December 29, 2016 9:36 AM
fotos espectaculars
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, January 9, 2017 2:10 AM
100 Great Teaching Images
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Human Population Through Time

It took 200,000 years for our human population to reach 1 billion—and only 200 years to reach 7 billion. But growth has begun slowing, as women have fewer babies on average. When will our global population peak? And how can we minimize our impact on Earth’s resources, even as we approach 11 billion?

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ROCAFORT's curator insight, December 6, 2016 2:14 AM
Human Population Through Time
Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, December 6, 2016 2:23 PM
Pour la DNL seconde
 
Jordyn Reeves's curator insight, January 11, 2017 3:44 PM
This relates to our topic by showing that our population is growing rapidly. By the time 2025 there will be more than 11 billion people on the Earth. But we have enough resources to last us.
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What's the tallest mountain on Earth?

What's the tallest mountain on Earth? | Social Studies Resources | Scoop.it

"Mount Everest is usually said to be the highest mountain on Earth. Reaching 29,035 feet at its summit, Everest is indeed the highest point above global mean sea level—the average level for the ocean surface from which elevations are measured. But the summit of Mt. Everest is not the farthest point from Earth’s center.

Earth is not a perfect sphere, but is a bit thicker at the Equator due to the centrifugal force created by the planet’s constant rotation. Because of this, the highest point above Earth’s center is the peak of Ecuador’s Mount Chimborazo, located just one degree south of the Equator where Earth’s bulge is greatest. The summit of Chimborazo is 20,564 feet above sea level. However, due to the Earth’s bulge, the summit of Chimborazo is over 6,560 feet farther from the center of the Earth than Everest’s peak. That makes Chimborazo the closest point on Earth to the stars.  

You may be surprised to learn that Everest is not the tallest mountain on Earth, either. That honor belongs to Mauna Kea, a volcano on the Big Island of Hawaii. Mauna Kea originates deep beneath the Pacific Ocean, and rises more than 32,800 feet from base to peak."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 25, 2016 6:42 PM

I've tried to answer this question without any visual aids and there is always at least one confused look in the class.  This infographic is the most straightforward way to give the 'long' answer to a seemingly simple question, "what is the tallest mountain on Earth?"  It all depends on how you measure it and what your reference point is.   

 

Tags: physicalEcuador, Nepal.

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Half the World Lives on 1% of Its Land, Mapped

Half the World Lives on 1% of Its Land, Mapped | Social Studies Resources | Scoop.it

"Data viz extraordinaire Max Galka created this map using NASA’s gridded population data, which counts the global population within each nine-square-mile patch of Earth, instead of within each each district, state, or country border. Out of the 28 million total cells, the ones with a population over 8,000 are colored in yellow."

 

Tags: population, density, mapping, visualization.


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Brian Weekley's curator insight, July 27, 2016 10:47 AM
Great simple map of world population.  Scroll down and look at the U.S.  It reflects the global trend.  This also has political implications, as evidenced by voting patterns in the 2012 presidential election.  Elections are dependent upon votes, which come from people, which are primarily clustered in cities.  Election campaigns would use this data to plan their schedules as to where to focus their campaigning efforts.  For the folks in Wyoming, they rarely see candidates other than during the primaries.  And these world populationclusters have been relatively consistent historically, particularly in south and east Asia.  Northern India has serious carrying capacity challenges. Notice the clusters along the Nile- evidence of arable land.
Francisco Restivo's curator insight, August 8, 2016 5:49 PM
Fantastic visualization!
David W. Deeds's curator insight, August 8, 2016 5:55 PM

Geeky-cool stuff! Thanks to Jim Lerman.

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This is an incredible visualization of the world's shipping routes

This is an incredible visualization of the world's shipping routes | Social Studies Resources | Scoop.it

"Ships carry 11 billion tons of goods each year. This interactive map shows where they all go.  About 11 billion tons of stuff gets carried around the world every year by large ships. Clothes, flat-screen TVs, grain, cars, oil — transporting these goods from port to port is what makes the global economy go 'round.  And now there's a great way to visualize this entire process, through this stunning interactive map from the UCL Energy Institute."


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Caitlyn Scott's curator insight, June 14, 2016 10:25 PM
This resource shows great detail into where are products travel when they are imported but also shows us what and where Australian products are going. Good source in regards to showing how large Australia's export market is. Article contains a good amount of information as to why the routes shown on the map are taken as well as having in-depth data showing the different cargo on board ships. This data helps high light what different countries are renowned for in their exports as well as giving so information into why some countries are poorer than others when analysing their exports. Planned use within unit regarding the cost of Australian exports and its sustainability for the future.      
Alex Smiga's curator insight, September 1, 2016 7:24 PM
A rainbow of shipping routes and info
James Piccolino's curator insight, January 18, 7:35 PM
This is incredibly interesting. I am a History guy, I love the subject and I love finding things I did not know about it. This fun interactive map did not so much contribute to direct knowledge of shipping/trade history as much as it has sparked my interest in it. There are old trade routes, who traveled down them and with what, and the ways those trade routes changed civilization and even sometimes started new ones. I never expected to say the words "Wow trade routes are fun!" but here I am. By the way, if you turn on absolutely everything at once, it creates this beautiful image. It is almost oddly relaxing. Sort of in the way some paintings can be.
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Mapping Density in the U.S.

Mapping Density in the U.S. | Social Studies Resources | Scoop.it
Population density in the US varies wildly from place to place.

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Bridgitte's curator insight, March 2, 2016 9:22 AM

I thought I shared this map or something very similiar a while back in 2013 when it was widely being shared but I couldn't find it.  Many countries have highly concentrated population distributions (like Canada and Australia) and the United States has pockets of extreme density interspersed throughout the country.  On the flip side, vast swaths of the countries are considered empty in terms of population such as this map that shows 1% of the total U.S. population in 42% of the area. and this one of the world that shows uneven patterns.

 

Tags: population, density, mapping, visualization.

Jacob Clauson's curator insight, March 3, 2016 8:31 AM

I thought I shared this map or something very similiar a while back in 2013 when it was widely being shared but I couldn't find it.  Many countries have highly concentrated population distributions (like Canada and Australia) and the United States has pockets of extreme density interspersed throughout the country.  On the flip side, vast swaths of the countries are considered empty in terms of population such as this map that shows 1% of the total U.S. population in 42% of the area. and this one of the world that shows uneven patterns.

 

Tags: population, density, mapping, visualization.

Dewayne Goad's curator insight, March 9, 2016 9:42 AM

I thought I shared this map or something very similiar a while back in 2013 when it was widely being shared but I couldn't find it.  Many countries have highly concentrated population distributions (like Canada and Australia) and the United States has pockets of extreme density interspersed throughout the country.  On the flip side, vast swaths of the countries are considered empty in terms of population such as this map that shows 1% of the total U.S. population in 42% of the area. and this one of the world that shows uneven patterns.

 

Tags: population, density, mapping, visualization.

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How well do you know the world's countries?

How well do you know the world's countries? | Social Studies Resources | Scoop.it
The average person's geography skills are fairly poor beyond their region. Test your knowledge of the countries at HowStuffWorks.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 9, 2016 3:58 PM

The questions are more "recall" than "higher order thinking" questions, but this batch of 30 questions is still a fun break from the regular routine. 

 

Tags: trivia, games.

Audrey DeSisto's curator insight, February 9, 2016 4:32 PM

On to geography...

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, February 13, 2016 9:37 PM

Questions...

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Geography as a Primary Source

Geography as a Primary Source | Social Studies Resources | Scoop.it

"A geographic perspective is a way of looking at and understanding our world. When you view the world through the lens of geography, you are asking who, what, where, when, and how people, places, and things are distributed across the surface of the earth, and why/how they got there. In other words, it means that you are analyzing something with a geographic perspective. The understanding and use of a geographic perspective is critical for decision making skills in the 21st century. Using spatial concepts such as location, region, movement, and scale to help us understand:

Interactions - How the world worksInterconnections - How systems in our world are connected Implications - How to make well-reasoned decisions"

---@natgeo, Geography as a Primary Source


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Jeremy Hansen's curator insight, January 27, 2016 3:59 PM

This is a field guide designed by National Geographic to help students strengthen their geographic skills.

Lilydale High School's curator insight, March 23, 2016 5:52 AM

This is a field guide designed by National Geographic to help students strengthen their geographic skills. 

 

Tags: National Geographic, perspective.

is bell's curator insight, March 29, 2016 10:28 PM

This is a field guide designed by National Geographic to help students strengthen their geographic skills. 

 

Tags: National Geographic, perspective.

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The Ultimate Canadian Geography Quiz

The Ultimate Canadian Geography Quiz | Social Studies Resources | Scoop.it

"From treasure maps to smart phone apps, geography makes sense of our world by describing locations, patterns and relationships of the Earth’s natural and social systems — both past and present. Canadian Geographic’s editors, along with the help of a number of Fellows of The Royal Canadian Geographical Society and other experts, compiled this ultimate Canadian geography quiz to truly test you. Think you’re a geo genius? Prove it!"


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 10, 2015 5:40 PM

These are 50 HARD questions (any student not from Canada that gets over 50% right should pat themselves on the back).  I will only give you one of the 50 answers since most of you have never been to the explore the frozen tunda; pictured above is a pingo.  Pingos form when groundwater is pressurized and forced upward in a concentrated area by advancing permafrost. This groundwater-saturated sediment freezes and expands as it’s driven toward the surface, causing the earth above to bulge and eventually break open. 

 

TagsCanada, trivia, games, Arctic, landforms.

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The Ganges River Is Dying Under the Weight of Modern India

The Ganges River Is Dying Under the Weight of Modern India | Social Studies Resources | Scoop.it
The country’s future depends on keeping the holy river alive.

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Sarah Holloway's curator insight, February 16, 2016 6:26 PM

This article touches on very serious religious and environmental issues connected to the Ganges River.  The Ganges is the sacred river of Hinduism and in part because the river valley is the most heavily populated region of India.  Simultaneously, this holy river is an incredibly polluted river as it's the watershed for a industrial region that struggles with significant sanitation problems; this is a great article on the environmental and cultural issues of development.

Zavier Lineberger's curator insight, April 24, 1:20 PM
(South Asia) Varanasi, the oldest city in India and the religious center of Hinduism, has an enormous business focusing around cremating bodies to scatter in the Ganges River. Hindus believe the Ganges can break the cycle of reincarnation, so many who do not have money to pay for cremation drop their deceased directly into the river to help them break this cycle. However, the river supports approximately 10% of the entire worlds' population and belief in Ganga, "the self-cleaning river god" allows for Indians to poison the same water they drink out of. It is estimated that 70% of people that use the water become diseased by the sewage and industrial waste poured into it.
India cannot stop dependence on the river. Hindus bath in the holy water of the Ganges, and an increasing population means increased water consumption. It will take concentrated efforts from government and spiritual leaders to change the dominate opinion.
brielle blais's curator insight, May 1, 6:39 PM
This article showcases how different aspects of geography can both help and harm a country. The Ganges River is incredibly important to India. It is a sacred place where the people believe in Ganges, the idea of allowing the dead to reach eternal liberation. Here, hundreds of bodies are burned a day. If they aren't burned, family members of the deceased let the dead float down the river. This phenomenon attracts many tourist and allows for the economy of India to thrive. However, the bodies are beginning to seriously pollute the river. Areas have become stagnant, full of disease. The problem doesn't end however, as India's population is increasing steadily as well. Water needs to be cleaned to meet the demand or India will face a true crisis.
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Changes in Three Gorges Dam

NASA's animation of China's Three Gorges Dam construction over the years.

Via Seth Dixon
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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 19, 2015 6:32 PM

Inland water - environmental change 

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, November 9, 2015 5:40 PM

The impact of the Three Gorges Dam on the residents upstream is amazing. I cannot imagine anything like this happening in the US, mostly because of the impact on the people both upstream and downstream. Ecological damage from this dam may not phase the Chinese government, but I think any North American or European government would shudder at the thought of the backlash among their citizens this would create.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 9:27 PM

Three Gorges damn in China is the largest dam ever constructed. This was created to save on power by creating hydroelectric power for the people of the land. One of the issues with this was the the flooding of the land up streams displacing millions of people. It created a larger up stream area and very small down stream. A lot of the people that lived up stream had to be relocated further inland and faced changing climatif weather. The banks of the river are carved out between what seems like mountainous regions so as you move more uphill the weather and temperature will be a whole new category of life (Depending on how far you relocated).