Social Studies Literacy
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Rescooped by Dessie Olson from Coffee Party News
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In D.C., no more civics?

In D.C., no more civics? | Social Studies Literacy | Scoop.it
These students live close enough to the sausage factory. Why rub their noses in it?

Via Charles Lang
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Coffee Party USA's curator insight, January 28, 2013 6:36 PM

Thomas Jefferson said that a nation that expects to be ignorant and free expects what never was and never shall be.

Rescooped by Dessie Olson from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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21 Literacy Resources For The Digital Teacher

21 Literacy Resources For The Digital Teacher | Social Studies Literacy | Scoop.it
21 Literacy Resources For The Digital Teacher

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Rescooped by Dessie Olson from History and Social Studies Education
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Civil War Battles & Casualties

Civil War Battles & Casualties | Social Studies Literacy | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, November 18, 2013 1:11 PM

Awesome interactive map of Civil War battles

Arlis Groves's curator insight, November 25, 2013 9:09 PM

This interactive map can be a helpful resource for details about battle casualties.

Teresa M. Nash's comment, November 28, 2013 2:20 AM
Awesome!
Rescooped by Dessie Olson from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
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Teaching Your Students How to Have a Conversation | Edutopia.com

Teaching Your Students How to Have a Conversation | Edutopia.com | Social Studies Literacy | Scoop.it

I was recently in a third grade classroom and was struck by the presence of rules that were posted for how to have a conversation. The poster said, "Each person must contribute to the discussion but take turns talking. Ask each other, 'Would you like to add to my idea?' or 'Can you tell us what you are thinking?' Ask questions so that you understand each other's ideas. Say, 'Can you tell me more about that?' or 'Can you say that in another way?'"

 

Having visited many middle and high schools, I think these same rules could -- and probably should -- be posted there as well.

 

Maybe you have also observed how common it is nowadays for students to not know how to have a conversation. Perhaps this owes to a preponderance of talk shows in which people with different opinions rarely listen to each other, instead preferring to out-shout their opponent. Maybe it is due to changed dinner habits where more families are eating on the go rather than sitting down together and catching up on each other's day. It could be about how texting and tweeting now trump talking and listening as today's preferred forms of communication.

 

Click headline to read more of the 8 Tips for Speaking and Listening--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Dessie Olson's insight:

Speaking and listening skills are not only important, but significant in helping students engage in a dialogue that's on topic.  By staying on topic, students are likely to deepen their understanding and expand their curiosity.  Unfortunately, many "talk shows" , the author refers to, do not model for students or the general population how conversations can lend themselves  to problem solving, innovational thought, or deeper analysis.  This is why it is critical for teachers to be intentional about how we help students engage in discussions.

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lantis mcckelvie's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:15 AM

Students need to have thier own voice!