Social Studies
3 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by mariaigncialc from World War II Time Period
Scoop.it!

Civilian Casualties of World War Two

Allies: Great Britain + Commonwealth 60,000 France 360,000 United States Minimal USSR 7,700,000 Belgium 90,000

Via Charlene Adriano
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by mariaigncialc from World War II Time Period
Scoop.it!

Timeline - Holocaust

Timeline - Holocaust | Social Studies | Scoop.it
Timeline showing the main events of the Holocaust 1933-45

Via Charlene Adriano
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by mariaigncialc from Stock Market Crash of the 1929
Scoop.it!

A 1929 stock market crash comparison to today's stock market chart

A 1929 stock market crash comparison to today's stock market chart | Social Studies | Scoop.it
In the previous article a comparison was made on two previous economic periods in which the stock market crashed and then rallied back in a big way just like it

 

The trading chart says that the market is almost basically the same as it was in 1929. 


Via Makiyah Loren
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by mariaigncialc from Stock Market Crash of the 1929
Scoop.it!

New York Times (October 25,1929) (Primary Doc. 1)

This is a Document about the stock market crash in 1929. It states that basically a lot of people lost a lot of their money. People were buying high and selling too low. People were scared that everything they had was going to be gone. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The most disastrous decline in the biggest and broadest stock market of history rocked the financial district yesterday. In the very midst of the collapse five of the country's most influential bankers hurried to the office of J. P. Morgan & Co., and after a brief conference gave out word that they believe the foundations of the market to be sound, that the market smash has been caused by technical rather than fundamental considerations, and that many sound stocks are selling too low.

Suddenly the market turned about on buying orders thrown into the pivotal issues, and before the final quotations were tapped out, four hours and eight minutes after the 3 o'clock bell, most stocks had regained a measurable part of their losses.

The break was one of the widest in the market's history, although the losses at the close were not particularly large, many having been recouped by the afternoon rally.

It carried down with it speculators, big and little, in every part of the country, wiping out thousands of accounts. It is probable that if the stockholders of the country's foremost corporations had not been calmed by the attitude of leading bankers and the subsequent rally, the business of the country would have been seriously affected. Doubtless business will feel the effects of the drastic stock shake-out, and this is expected to hit the luxuries most severely.

The total losses cannot be accurately calculated, because of the large number of markets and the thousands of securities not listed on any exchange. However, they were staggering, running into billions of dollars. Fear struck the big speculators and little ones, big investors and little ones. Thousands of them threw their holdings into the whirling Stock Exchange pit for what they would bring. Losses were tremendous and thousands of prosperous brokerage and bank accounts, sound and healthy a week ago were completely wrecked in the strange debacle, due to a combination of circumstances, but accelerated into a crash by fear.

Under these circumstances of late tickers and spreads of 10, 20, and at times 30 points between the tape prices and those on the floor of the Exchange, the entire financial district was thrown into hopeless confusion and excitement. Wild-eyed speculators crowded the brokerage offices, awed by the disaster which had overtaken many of them. They followed the market literally "in the dark," getting but meager reports via the financial news tickers which printed the Exchange floor prices at ten-minute intervals.

Rumors, most of them wild and false, spread throughout the Wall Street district and thence throughout the country. One of the reports was that eleven speculators had committed suicide. A peaceful workman atop a Wall Street building looked down and saw a big crowd watching him, for the rumor had spread that he was going to jump off. Reports that the Chicago and Buffalo Exchanges had closed spread throughout the district, as did rumors that the New York Stock Exchange and the New York Curb Exchange were going to suspend trading. These rumors and reports were all found, on investigation, to be untrue.

 


Via Makiyah Loren
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by mariaigncialc from Stock Market Crash of the 1929
Scoop.it!

Deflation: 1929 vs. Today

Deflation: 1929 vs. Today | Social Studies | Scoop.it
The Great Depression years 1929-33 featured a large and prolonged deflation. January 2009 reversed a deflation pattern for 2008 that was ominously similar to 1929's, an economist writes.

Via Makiyah Loren
more...
Makiyah Loren's curator insight, February 20, 2013 9:53 AM

In 2008 there was a deflation pattern similar to 1929's. And just like in 1929, consumer prices became increasingly high. 

Rescooped by mariaigncialc from World War II Time Period
Scoop.it!

Battle of the Atlantic

The Battle of the Atlantic played a very significant part in World War Two.

Via Charlene Adriano
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by mariaigncialc from World War II Time Period
Scoop.it!

World War II Map, Second World War Map, World War 2 Map

World War II Map, Second World War Map, World War 2 Map | Social Studies | Scoop.it
World War II map throws light on the political scenario of the world during the war. Maps of World's World War 2 map shows the Allies, Axis and neutral countries of the world during World War II.

Via Charlene Adriano
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by mariaigncialc from Stock Market Crash of the 1929
Scoop.it!

Stock Market Crash of 1929

Stock Market Crash of 1929 | Social Studies | Scoop.it
This article discusses the stock market crash of 1929, including Black Thursday, Black Monday, as well as some of the events leading up to the crash.

Via Makiyah Loren
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by mariaigncialc from Stock Market Crash of the 1929
Scoop.it!

The Stock Market Crash of 1929 | Stock Market Crash!

The Stock Market Crash of 1929 | Stock Market Crash! | Social Studies | Scoop.it
Learn about America's Stock Market Crash of 1929 and how it led to the Great Depression.

Via Makiyah Loren
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by mariaigncialc from Stock Market Crash of the 1929
Scoop.it!

Definitions for Stock Market Crash

Definitions-

 

Stock Market: a stock exchange

 

Banks: A financial establishment that invests money deposited by customers, pays it out when required, and makes loans at interest.

 

Credit: The ability to obtain goods or services before payment, based on the trust that payment will be made in the future: "unlimited credit".

 

Great Depression: the economic crisis beginning with the stock market crash in 1929 and continuing through the 1930s.

 

Okies: Okie is a term, dating from as early as 1907, originally denoting a resident or native of Oklahoma.

 

.

FDR: Nickname of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt

 

Stock: The goods or merchandise kept on the premises of a business or warehouse and available for sale or distribution.

 

New Deal: The economic measures introduced by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1933 to counteract the effects of the Great Depression.

 

Depression Relief: helping in the depression

 

10. Bonus Army: The self-named Bonus Expeditionary Force was an assemblage of some 43,000 marchers—17,000 World War I veterans,

 

 

 

 


Via Makiyah Loren
more...
No comment yet.