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The brutal world of sheep fighting: the illegal sport beloved by Algeria’s 'lost generation'

The brutal world of sheep fighting: the illegal sport beloved by Algeria’s 'lost generation' | Geography | Scoop.it

"Algeria’s ‘lost generation’ has been shaped by years of conflict, unemployment and state repression. Sheep fighting offers an arena where young men can escape the constant supervision of the state."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 19, 12:30 PM

I must confess that it was a mixture of morbid curiosity, the allure of the strangely exotic, with more than a dash of horror that initially impelled me to read this article.  If if is not your thing (and I'm guessing that by the title you should already know), I certainly understand and don't recommend that you read it.  However, there was some intriguing geography in the article as it painted a bleak picture of disenfranchised young men in a pent-up country that did not experience an Arab Spring.  Some elements in this article that I thing might intrigue geography teachers are: the pastoral folk culture of North Africa impacting their popular culture pastimes, complexly gendered cultural customs and place-based cultural politics.   

 

Tags: culture, gendersport, folk cultures, Algeria, Middle East.

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The Age of Borders

The Age of Borders | Geography | Scoop.it

"The creation date of (almost) every international border.  Full-size image here."

 

Tags: infographic, worldwide, borders, political, historical.


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Nancy Watson's curator insight, February 23, 10:04 PM
Political Unit: History of  borders
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, February 27, 6:33 AM

Preliminary - Political Geography 

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Borders and the Arctic Ocean

The ice in the Arctic is disappearing. Melting Arctic ice means new economic opportunities: trade routes in the Arctic ocean, and access to natural resources. Because of this, the Arctic nations are now moving to expand their border claims. Russia has shown that it’s the most ambitious, using a potent combination of soft power and military buildup to advance its agenda. They’ve said the Arctic is rightfully theirs.

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Matt Manish's curator insight, February 16, 10:31 PM
Since the 1980's a significant amount of ice in Antarctic ocean has melted away. This is a big deal because this is causing the changing of borders in this part of the world. With all the ice melting in Antarctica, this opens up new shipping lanes with much faster routes. This also makes it much easier for to drill for natural resources such as gas and oil, that were once difficult to get to because they were covered in ice. This is causing countries like Russia, Canada, Finland, and others to desire for new borders to be drawn up, hopefully in favor of their nation. Russia has even started developing military bases on some of the coast line that is opening up in Antarctica. It will be interesting to see how the borders in the Arctic circle are going to change and how it will also effect world trade in that part of the world.
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, February 27, 6:36 AM

Preliminary - Political Geography 

Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, March 31, 3:09 PM
In this video, Vox Borders looks into who owns the Arctic. Because of the significant melting ice, the water ways of the Arctic may be opening up… this video looks into the efforts that Russia has made to declare the region. For example, off the coast of Russia, near the north pole lies a mining town, that was established to make sure Russia has a spot that they can declare as their own in the Arctic.
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Swiss town denies passport to Dutch vegan because she is ‘too annoying’

Swiss town denies passport to Dutch vegan because she is ‘too annoying’ | Geography | Scoop.it

"A Dutch vegan who applied for a Swiss passport has had her application rejected because the locals found her too annoying.
Nancy Holten, 42, moved to Switzerland from the Netherlands when she was eight years old and now has children who are Swiss nationals. However, when she tried to get a Swiss passport for herself, residents of Gipf-Oberfrick in the canton of Aargau rejected her application. Ms Holten, a vegan and animal rights activist, has campaigned against the use of cowbells in the village and her actions have annoyed the locals. The resident’s committee argued that if she does not accept Swiss traditions and the Swiss way of life, she should not be able to become an official national."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 16, 1:04 PM

Fighting against local customs and place-based traditions can have some political repercussions

Matt Manish's curator insight, March 16, 2:51 PM
What a unique situation! On one hand it does seem to be a bit ridiculous to deny someone of a passport just because they are "annoying". Also, Nancy Holten who is mentioned in the article does make a good point about the cow bells are hurting the cows in the town she is applying for citizenship in. But as I read further into this article and learned how she is trying to change many of the town's cultural traditions, it began to make more sense why the citizens of the town do not want to grant her citizenship. I find it interesting Holten still wants to move to this Swiss town after they rejected her passport twice already, since most people look for places to live with good neighbors, not a whole town that thinks you're annoying. Ultimately, now that this case has escalated further into an upper level of the Swiss government, it will be compelling to see if Holten is granted Swiss citizenship after all.
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Bad Internet Maps: 'A Social Media Plague'

Bad Internet Maps: 'A Social Media Plague' | Geography | Scoop.it

"Business Insider’s widely mocked, since-deleted-from-Twitter, but very very viral map of the most popular fast food restaurants by state is the launching-off point for The Ringer’s Claire McNear, who rants about the maps clogging the Internet that are stupid, uninformed, wrong and exist only to generate clicks."

 

Tags: mapping, social media, cartography.


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Matt Manish's curator insight, February 17, 12:47 AM
This article talks about the many fake maps arising on the internet in order to get likes or for people to re-share it. Many times there are maps with incorrect data going around on the internet because some people want their content to go viral so bad they are willing to make up statistics in order for it to do so. This is why it is always important to check the sources for content you come across, and not just believe every piece of material you come across on the internet. Too many times people are misled by false information on the internet because they don't check the source it came from. As technology like the internet becomes more advanced, hopefully we will become more skilled at discerning false information such as fake maps on the web.
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We’re creating cow islands

We’re creating cow islands | Geography | Scoop.it
The parts of the United States that have higher populations of dairy cows are in the West and northern states.

 

Milk has moved away from cities between 2001 and 2011. Red areas indicate less milk in 2011 than 2001, green areas mean more and a buff color designates a neutral milk region.

Almost every region where you see a dark red area indicating a sharp decline in production has a large and growing population center nearby.


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ava smith's curator insight, January 8, 11:24 PM
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Matt Manish's curator insight, February 16, 9:09 PM
I've never really wondered which parts of the country produce the milk I consume on a regular basis. But as the maps in this article show there are certain parts of country that are densely populated with cows for the sole purpose of producing milk. This article also indicates that the "cow islands" in the Southeastern part of the United States are becoming smaller, while the density of the "cow islands" in the Northern and Western parts of the country are increasing at a significantly steady rate. While reading this article, I learned more about where the most cows in the U.S. are producing milk and how that might affect the price of the milk I buy.
Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, February 19, 1:44 PM
How would this relate to the Von Thunen model we discussed?
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How the letters of the alphabet got their names

How the letters of the alphabet got their names | Geography | Scoop.it
There seems to be little predictability to the English names for the letters of the alphabet, to say nothing of the names of letters in other languages. Some begin with an e-as-in-egg sound (eff, ell); some end in an ee sound (tee, dee); and others have no obvious rhyme or reason to them at all. How did they get that way?

 

Tags: language, culture, historical, English.


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Unfair Race lesson plan

Unfair Race lesson plan | Geography | Scoop.it
Students represent different countries and step forward or backward based on social and economic conditions in their borders and see which countries take the lead toward health.

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Capital Jerusalem

Capital Jerusalem | Geography | Scoop.it

"Because Israel refused to recognize the U.N. plan for an internationalized Jerusalem and because of its annexation of occupied East Jerusalem in 1967, no country in the world has offered legal and diplomatic recognition of Jerusalem as the capital of Israel. Most states, however, have unofficially acknowledged Israel's sovereignty and actual possession, without recognition of lawful title."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 6, 2017 9:16 AM

That is, until now.  The United States is planning to move it's embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, in a move that will have far more reaching implications than the relocation of just about any other embassy on Earth could have, given the geopolitical significance of Jerusalem to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and the broader international ties.  Below are some resources to contextualize this shift: 

 

Questions to Ponder: How does this change the status quo at the local, national and international scales?  What might be some of the consequences of this move?  What would you recommend and why?  

 

Tags: Israel, Palestine, borders, political, Middle East, geopolitics, historical.

Richard Aitchison's curator insight, March 7, 9:12 AM
It was a major move by the Trump administration with far reaching complications.  Now it if you take out all of the past history in the area and all of the future political/military problems in the area does it make sense to recognize Jerusalem as the capital, well yes. However, in this world that we live in it surely is not that simple. With the past, current, and future arguments in the area between Israel and the Palestine's this further creates a rift between both and probably takes us further away from a resolution. From a geography and economic perspective Jerusalem would be a great central location in which to work from, however since there is so much contested space there it simply does not work. It isn't always the best place from a geographical standpoint (although in an ideal world that be perfect), but the one in our current political climate that makes the most sense for ones own country. This is a decision that we will have to look back at for the next decade or so and see eventually the impact that it will have on the current situation. 
Douglas Vance's curator insight, March 22, 12:36 PM
The decision by the US to move its embassy to Jerusalem and recognize the city as the capital of Israel totally and absolutely undermines almost any chance at a two state solution. With this declaration, the US has taken sides and the idea that a two state solution with a Jerusalem under international government has essentially vanished. Even if the US were to reverse their decision in the future, the damage has already been done. 
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English--Origins and Roots

When we talk about ‘English’, we often think of it as a single language. But what do the dialects spoken in dozens of countries around the world have in common with each other, or with the writings of Chaucer? Claire Bowern traces the language from the present day back to its ancient roots, showing how English has evolved through generations of speakers.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 7, 2017 2:30 PM

English has obviously changed much over the years, but this video (and lesson) also shows some good language family information and traces it back to proto-Indo-European, using the English as the main example.  This other TED-ED video (and lesson) shows how the connotations of English words often times depend on the linguistic root (sweat--Germanic, perspire--Latin).   

 

Tags: languagecultureEnglishTED, video.

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Once a Year, Thousands of Sheep Take Over Madrid

Once a Year, Thousands of Sheep Take Over Madrid | Geography | Scoop.it
This festival celebrates the centuries-old tradition of seasonal livestock migration.

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Matt Manish's curator insight, March 16, 12:59 PM
I found this to be a very interesting tradition for such a major city in Spain like Madrid. I could definitely see this happening in smaller towns that want to honor their culture and their ancestors, but this seems like it would be the equivalent of seeing parts of New York city closed down for herds of animals to pass through for an old tradition. I find it very unusual that a major city would do this, but also very cool that the citizens of Madrid pay homage to their culture in such a way. Especially with the whole city getting behind it and looking forward to the event. It must be a real sight to see so many sheep passing through this big city as well.
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Pie Chart of the World’s Most Spoken Languages

Pie Chart of the World’s Most Spoken Languages | Geography | Scoop.it

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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, November 29, 2017 8:50 AM
Pie Chart of the World’s Most Spoken Languages
Ziggi Ivan Santini's curator insight, November 30, 2017 4:00 AM

This infographic is a great way to visualize the dominant languages on Earth.

LLewe LLyn Cooper's curator insight, January 14, 10:07 PM
Languages all over the world
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Korean Baseball 101: Way Beyond the Bat Flips

Baseball in South Korea is more than a game. It’s akin to a religion. American missionaries first brought the sport to the peninsula in 1905, and the country absolutely loved it. Today, the Korean Baseball Organization (KBO) features 10 teams and a unique sporting culture all its own. The city of Busan and its hometown Lotte Giants have a particularly passionate fan base. From the hitters’ flashy bat flips, to the team’s famous “cheermaster” and its unlikely American super fan, consider this is your crash course on the joyful madness that is Lotte Giants fandom.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 30, 2017 4:00 PM

If a sport (or other cultural practice) diffuses to a new place, is it going to look exactly the same as it does in the original cultural hearth? Maybe, or like baseball in South Korea, it can have a culture all its own. This is an interesting story that shows how the diffusion of cultural traits around the globe doesn't have to lead to a more bland cultural mosaic. As cultural traits are reterritorialized into new places, they add vibrancy to the cultural fabric of the institution/sub-culture that they've adopted.

 

 

Tags: sport, popular culturediffusion, culturecultural norms, South Korea, East Asia.

Katie Kershaw's curator insight, April 12, 1:28 PM
I don’t know if I subconsciously usually pick scoops that focus on negative situations, but this was one of the few scoops I can remember watching and feeling happy afterwards.  It is so cool that two countries can share a love for the same sport and watch the sport in such different ways.  The Korean fans seem to have much more enthusiasm while watching the game and the atmosphere seems really fun.  I have always enjoyed watching baseball and when I ask other people why they don’t watch, they always say they find it to be too boring.  But watching a Lotte Giants game seems to be anything but boring.  I think one of the biggest cultural differences that I saw between American baseball fans and Korean baseball fans is the ways in which they cheer.  I think that Americans use a lot more smack talk and taunting when they are at baseball games, but the Koreans seem to only be positive.  This is ironic because the Koreans are much more showy with how they cheer, but it’s not obnoxious or unsportsmanlike, it’s just peppy.  I also think it’s unique that the Lotte Giants have a cheer master, who’s job is to get the fans hyped.  American baseball doesn’t have anything close to this with the exception of mascots.  The American equivalent to the cheer master would probably be football or basketball cheerleaders, but they never get the crowd to be so in sync.  I also saw a lot of American influences still present in Korea, even though their experience is so different.  The most obvious is that the team name is in English and happens to also be an MLB team.  I also noticed that many advertisements had English and Korean on them.  It’s interesting that even though the sport is the same, the ways in which the fans celebrate are so different.
Mike curta's curator insight, April 26, 8:41 AM
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Italy's regional divisions

"150 years after its unification, Italy remains riven by regional differences." For more of these videos, visit http://arcg.is/1IeK3dT


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Matt Manish's curator insight, March 15, 8:16 PM
What is interesting about Italy is that the region it is in has been around for and has influenced world culture for thousands of years. But Italy as a nation is fairly new as it was only developed into a unified state 150 years ago. What is also interesting about Italy's geography is that many cultural and economic trends differ from the Northern part to the Southern part of the country. For example, a person in Northern Italy is likely to make twice as much income as someone in Southern Italy. Adding to that, as far as culture goes, there is also a division among the different dialects throughout the North and South of Italy as well. As a result of this information, one can see how important it is to not lump an entire nation into one category for it is made up of various elements from the different divisions and opinions among it's people.
brielle blais's curator insight, March 25, 1:18 PM
This showcases geography because it is an example of how a country can be so divided even though everyone is from the same homeland. However, to Italians, their geographic location in Italy is very important. People take a lot of pride in which region they are from, whether it's between the politics of the north and south Italy or the different dialects spoken between the different regions. The divided is also seen economically as northern Italy is wealthier, and southern Italy is filled with more poverty and unemployment. 
tyrone perry's curator insight, April 18, 11:18 PM
The disunity in Italy has been going on for centuries.  With the north and south basically completely different and divided.  The north is wealthier than the south.  Dialect and language even differ With the two. In the south poverty and unemployment is high.  A Majority of italys prime ministers came from the north.  Many people in the north want to to get full independence for the south.
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Geography undervalued in understanding of world

Geography undervalued in understanding of world | Geography | Scoop.it

Improving skills in ­literacy and numeracy are vitally important components of school education. But it is wrong to assume that these can only be achieved by teaching English and Mathematics respectively. Many other subjects can and do teach these skills using real life examples. Geography is one of these ­subjects. Articulating orally and in writing one’s understanding of the world is one sure way of increasing literacy. Collecting, analysing and using information about the world increases ­students’ numeracy, and gives them a better grounding as ­citizens and future employees. But geography is much more than this. Surely we should aspire to our children and ­grandchildren having a greater understanding of their world: what is happening around them, ­analysing the causes and ­assessing solutions?"


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 13, 2017 3:07 PM

I know that understanding the importance of geography is nothing new to my readers, but I am gathering articles that are useful to share with administrators and colleagues in the fight against geographic ignorance.  One this site I've tagged these articles under tag "geography matters."  

 

Tagseducation, K12geography education, geography matters.

Matt Manish's curator insight, February 1, 1:39 PM
In this article, Roger Crofts explains how in most schools the main subject focus for students is literacy, math, science, and sometimes a foreign language. While social sciences such as geography usually get put on the back burner in the education system. He also makes the argument that geography helps teach imperative skills like literacy and math which is why this subject should have more of an emphasis in school settings. In response to Crofts' article and from my own experience in public schools, his article lines right up with what I was taught when I was younger. When I was in high school, there was a heavy push to learn math, literacy, and science, and also to be tested on these subjects with standardized tests. I feel that there should be a heavy emphasis on these subjects in schools, but there should also still be room for other classes that are creative and help to mold well rounded individuals. Furthermore, I believe this could become possible if standardized tests occurred less and more focus was put on the actual student rather than their standardized test scores.
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Esri Story Map Treasure Hunt

Esri Story Map Treasure Hunt | Geography | Scoop.it

Although these were designed specifically for GIS day during Geography Awareness Week, these 2 excellent map-based treasure hunts from ESRI are great any time of year.  The answer to the question will only pop up in you are zoomed in the the right region (SHIFT + Make a box = Zoom to area).  These links will take you to the World Cities quiz and also to the Mountains quiz.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 18, 6:54 PM

I love this geography, map-based quiz that let's people explore the world as they learn about some interesting places.  

Douglas Vance's curator insight, January 18, 7:00 PM

This is a brand new and to me, a unique way of exploring global geography by using trivia questions as a means to explore the world.

Kami Romeike's curator insight, April 8, 5:29 PM

I love this geography, map-based quiz that let's people explore the world as they learn about some interesting places.  

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Swiss town denies passport to Dutch vegan because she is ‘too annoying’

Swiss town denies passport to Dutch vegan because she is ‘too annoying’ | Geography | Scoop.it

"A Dutch vegan who applied for a Swiss passport has had her application rejected because the locals found her too annoying.
Nancy Holten, 42, moved to Switzerland from the Netherlands when she was eight years old and now has children who are Swiss nationals. However, when she tried to get a Swiss passport for herself, residents of Gipf-Oberfrick in the canton of Aargau rejected her application. Ms Holten, a vegan and animal rights activist, has campaigned against the use of cowbells in the village and her actions have annoyed the locals. The resident’s committee argued that if she does not accept Swiss traditions and the Swiss way of life, she should not be able to become an official national."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 16, 1:04 PM

Fighting against local customs and place-based traditions can have some political repercussions

Matt Manish's curator insight, March 16, 2:51 PM
What a unique situation! On one hand it does seem to be a bit ridiculous to deny someone of a passport just because they are "annoying". Also, Nancy Holten who is mentioned in the article does make a good point about the cow bells are hurting the cows in the town she is applying for citizenship in. But as I read further into this article and learned how she is trying to change many of the town's cultural traditions, it began to make more sense why the citizens of the town do not want to grant her citizenship. I find it interesting Holten still wants to move to this Swiss town after they rejected her passport twice already, since most people look for places to live with good neighbors, not a whole town that thinks you're annoying. Ultimately, now that this case has escalated further into an upper level of the Swiss government, it will be compelling to see if Holten is granted Swiss citizenship after all.
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Robots can pick strawberries. Now what?

Robots can pick strawberries. Now what? | Geography | Scoop.it

"The robots have arrived. And they’ll be picking crops in Florida fields soon. Robots can do things humans can’t. They can pick all through the night. They can measure weight better. They can pack boxes more efficiently. They don’t take sick days, they don’t have visa problems.

Google 'are robots taking our jobs?' and you get millions of theories: Robots will take over most jobs within 30 years; yes, but it’s a good thing; yes, but they will create jobs, too; chill out, they won’t take them all. Truckers, surgeons, accountants and journalists have all been theoretically replaced by prognosticators.

But harvesting specialty crops is different: Plants vary in shape and size and determining ripeness is complex — experts have said there are too many variables for robots. Until now."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 2, 2017 5:14 PM

Many industries have been, and will continue to be transformed by automation and robotics.  There is a great amount of uncertainty and anxiety in the labor pools as workers see many low skill jobs are being outsourced and other jobs are being automated.  Some economic organizations are preparing resources for workers to strengthen their skills for the era of automation. 

 

Questions to Ponder: How will a machine like this transform the agricultural business? How might it impact migration, food prices, or food waste?

 

Tags: economic, laboragribusiness, industry, food production, agriculture.

Jane Ellingson's curator insight, December 18, 2017 9:05 AM
Structural Changes in the economy.
Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, February 19, 1:46 PM
Where will this lead us in terms of population, economics, and agriculture?
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The Real Threat to Hinduism: The Slow Death of India's Rivers

The Real Threat to Hinduism: The Slow Death of India's Rivers | Geography | Scoop.it

Hinduism shares an intricate, intimate relationship with the climate, geography, and biodiversity of South Asia; its festivals, deities, mythology, scriptures, calendar, rituals, and even superstitions are rooted in nature. There is a strong bond between Hinduism and South Asia’s forests, wildlife, rivers, seasons, mountains, soils, climate, and richly varied geography, which is manifest in the traditional layout of a typical Hindu household’s annual schedule. Hinduism’s existence is tied to all of these natural entities, and more prominently, to South Asia’s rivers.

 

Hinduism as a religion celebrates nature’s bounty, and what could be more representative of nature’s bounty than a river valley? South Asian rivers have sustained and nourished Hindu civilizations for centuries. They are responsible for our prosperous agriculture, timely monsoons, diverse aquatic ecosystems, riverine trade and commerce, and cultural richness.  Heavily dammed, drying in patches, infested by sand mafia and land grabbers, poisoned by untreated sewage and industrial waste, and hit by climate change — our rivers, the cradle of Hinduism, are in a sorry state.

 

If there is ever a threat to Hinduism, this is it. Destroy South Asia’s rivers and with it, Hinduism’s history and mythology will be destroyed. Rituals will turn into mockery, festivals, a farce, and Hinduism itself, a glaring example of man’s hypocritical relationship with nature. The fact that we worship our rivers as mothers and then choke them to death with all sorts of filth is already eminent.


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Douglas Vance's curator insight, April 23, 12:36 PM
The threat to Hinduism seems to in a way be a self inflicted wound. Despite the bias of the article and some of the crackdowns on certain religious practices in India, the fact is that Hinduism's inseparable ties to nature and rivers puts it in a tenuous position as the population of India explodes. If something isn't done to preserve and clean up these rivers, Hinduism may be at risk of destroying itself both figuratively and possibly quite literally. 
Zavier Lineberger's curator insight, April 24, 12:57 PM
(South Asia) With a population of 1.3 billion people, India is bound to have serious problems with pollution. But pollution has a profound impact on a religion closely tied with nature and geographic locations for thousands of years. Rivers that were previously seen as the "nurturers of Hinduism" are now drying up because of climate change or are polluting the area. The destruction of Indian rivers is not given proper public attention and the loss of rivers could lead to the loss of Indian history and the meaning of Hindu culture.
Nicole Canova's curator insight, May 1, 1:21 AM
Religion is shaped by the geography of the region in which it develops.  For example, Hinduism is heavily influenced by the rivers of India, and these rivers are considered holy places sites and places of cleansing and purification.  However, the cleansing power of the rivers is diminished by pollution that makes it unsafe to take part in ritual bathing.  Pollution, climate change, and deforestation are also having an impact on other aspects of Hinduism, which is about celebrating nature in it's entirety, including monsoons, forests, and agriculture.  As nature continues to be negatively impacted by human activity, many aspects of Hinduism will also be negatively impacted.
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Walmart Nation: Mapping the Largest Employers in the U.S.

Walmart Nation: Mapping the Largest Employers in the U.S. | Geography | Scoop.it
Walmart employs 1.5 million people across the country - and the retail behemoth is now the largest private employer in 22 states.

 

In an era where Amazon steals most of the headlines, it’s easy to forget about brick-and-mortar retailers like Walmart.

But, even though the market values the Bezos e-commerce juggernaut at about twice the sum of Walmart, the blue big-box store is very formidable in other ways. For example, revenue and earnings are two areas where Walmart still reigns supreme, and the stock just hit all-time highs yesterday on an earnings beat.

 

Tag: rural, retail, labor, economic, industry.


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Matt Manish's curator insight, February 18, 5:41 PM
The job market always seems to be changing whether it is up or down, especially in today's diverse economy. I knew that Walmart is quite a large corporation, but I didn't know that they were one of the largest employers in the United States with 1.5 million employees and counting. Also, even though Walmart is spread out throughout the country, I did pick up on a trend that Walmart seems to be most popular in the South. Although,one thing I did notice in this map that didn't make much sense to me is why this article states it is "excluding public administrative bodies, such as state governments" from their data. I can understand why they would want to exclude that information, but what I don't comprehend is why they include state governed universities into their map that is supposed to show the largest private employers in the U.S. Even with this information, I did learn a lot about the many jobs Walmart helps provide for the U.S. economy.
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3 TED Talks that explore what it means to be human

3 TED Talks that explore what it means to be human | Geography | Scoop.it
Fascinating, insightful talks on what it means to be human and live a good life.

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Quebec urges shopkeepers to stop saying 'Hi'

Quebec urges shopkeepers to stop saying 'Hi' | Geography | Scoop.it

The unofficial greeting in the bilingual Canadian city of Montreal has long been a friendly 'Bonjour, Hi!' But that standard is no more since a motion mandating store clerks to greet customers only in French was passed in Quebec's provincial legislature. The move reaffirms French as the primary language in the province, where use of English can be controversial. The motion - which is not a law - was passed unanimously, but the province's premier called the debate 'ridiculous'. Introduced by the fiercely Francophile Parti Quebecois, the motion 'invites all businesses and workers who enter into contact with local and international clients to welcome them warmly with the word bonjour'."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 1, 2017 8:26 PM

This is a great example of how culture isn't just passively received, but it's actively constructed.  The call to defend cultural traits of a region to maintain it's local distinctiveness is oftentimes why a region has a strong sense of place.  

 

TagsCanadalanguage, placeculture, landscape

Matt Richardson's curator insight, January 3, 2:24 PM
The actions of the Quebecois legislature to regulate free speech is a form of hierarchical diffusion. Here is a [slightly dated but good] video explaining the modern complexity of the French/English divide in Canada, especially as it relates to new immigrants.
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Why Do India And China Have So Many People?

India and China have so many people today because they’re good for farming and big, but they’ve always been that way, so they’ve actually had a huge proportion of Earth’s people for thousands of years.

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He loved ‘The Simpsons.’ But Hari Kondabolu has a problem with Apu.

He loved ‘The Simpsons.’ But Hari Kondabolu has a problem with Apu. | Geography | Scoop.it

Comedian Hari Kondabolu loves “The Simpsons” but hates the character Apu, a caricature made entirely of South Asian stereotypes. He even made a documentary about it.


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Korean Baseball 101: Way Beyond the Bat Flips

Baseball in South Korea is more than a game. It’s akin to a religion. American missionaries first brought the sport to the peninsula in 1905, and the country absolutely loved it. Today, the Korean Baseball Organization (KBO) features 10 teams and a unique sporting culture all its own. The city of Busan and its hometown Lotte Giants have a particularly passionate fan base. From the hitters’ flashy bat flips, to the team’s famous “cheermaster” and its unlikely American super fan, consider this is your crash course on the joyful madness that is Lotte Giants fandom.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 30, 2017 4:00 PM

If a sport (or other cultural practice) diffuses to a new place, is it going to look exactly the same as it does in the original cultural hearth? Maybe, or like baseball in South Korea, it can have a culture all its own. This is an interesting story that shows how the diffusion of cultural traits around the globe doesn't have to lead to a more bland cultural mosaic. As cultural traits are reterritorialized into new places, they add vibrancy to the cultural fabric of the institution/sub-culture that they've adopted.

 

 

Tags: sport, popular culturediffusion, culturecultural norms, South Korea, East Asia.

Katie Kershaw's curator insight, April 12, 1:28 PM
I don’t know if I subconsciously usually pick scoops that focus on negative situations, but this was one of the few scoops I can remember watching and feeling happy afterwards.  It is so cool that two countries can share a love for the same sport and watch the sport in such different ways.  The Korean fans seem to have much more enthusiasm while watching the game and the atmosphere seems really fun.  I have always enjoyed watching baseball and when I ask other people why they don’t watch, they always say they find it to be too boring.  But watching a Lotte Giants game seems to be anything but boring.  I think one of the biggest cultural differences that I saw between American baseball fans and Korean baseball fans is the ways in which they cheer.  I think that Americans use a lot more smack talk and taunting when they are at baseball games, but the Koreans seem to only be positive.  This is ironic because the Koreans are much more showy with how they cheer, but it’s not obnoxious or unsportsmanlike, it’s just peppy.  I also think it’s unique that the Lotte Giants have a cheer master, who’s job is to get the fans hyped.  American baseball doesn’t have anything close to this with the exception of mascots.  The American equivalent to the cheer master would probably be football or basketball cheerleaders, but they never get the crowd to be so in sync.  I also saw a lot of American influences still present in Korea, even though their experience is so different.  The most obvious is that the team name is in English and happens to also be an MLB team.  I also noticed that many advertisements had English and Korean on them.  It’s interesting that even though the sport is the same, the ways in which the fans celebrate are so different.
Mike curta's curator insight, April 26, 8:41 AM
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