Social services news
75.7K views | +4 today
 
Scooped by irissorg
onto Social services news
Scoop.it!

Health and Social Care Integration Forum - Glasgow

Health and Social Care Integration Forum - Glasgow | Social services news | Scoop.it
This forum, facilitated by the Integration Support Team, aims to provide a safe space for the 3rd sector (and those interested in working more closely with the sector) to discuss and explore the opportunities and challenges in Health and Social Care Integration in Scotland. One of the main topics of discussion at this forum will … Continued
more...
No comment yet.
Social services news
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by irissorg
Scoop.it!

Respite care model can be replicated across Scotland, says Leuchie House’s retiring CEO Mairi O’Keefe

Respite care model can be replicated across Scotland, says Leuchie House’s retiring CEO Mairi O’Keefe | Social services news | Scoop.it
Interview: Mairi O’Keefe tells Holyrood that people with neurological conditions deserve a human rights based approach...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by irissorg
Scoop.it!

Film-maker and disability activist calls on Nicola Sturgeon to scrap care fees - The Scotsman

Film-maker and disability activist calls on Nicola Sturgeon to scrap care fees - The Scotsman | Social services news | Scoop.it
A young film-maker and disability activist has called on the Scottish Government to intervene in a fight to scrap charges for social care.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by irissorg
Scoop.it!

Hate Crime Scotland | Working in Partnership for a safer Scotland

Hate Crime Scotland | Working in Partnership for a safer Scotland | Social services news | Scoop.it
Welcome This website provides information and resources relating to crimes motivated by prejudice, or hate crime. There is growing understanding among services that crimes motivated by prejudice have a damaging effect on individuals and communities. Social isolation, feelings of anger, shame and embarrassment, mistrust, depression, fearfulness and anxiety are all common reactions for victims of hate crime. These in turn can impact on many areas of life including employment, education, health, housing, relationships and ability to fully participate in society. The harm of hate crime goes further and we recognise that the impact of hate crime extends beyond the individual victims who experience the hostility, to whole communities and social groups. Good social relations generally are undermined by hate crimes, as they create mistrust and suspicion between communities. This makes hate crime an issue for every service and every community. The Scottish Government has made it justice strategy priority to enable communities to be safe and supportive, where individuals exercise their rights and responsibilities. This means that promoting good relations and tackling hate crime should be a priority for public agencies such as local authorities, as well as Police Scotland. We are all responsible for working together on the government’s priorities for justice. What Is hatecrimescotland.org ? Community Safety Glasgow is responsible for this website. Along with our partners, we are working to increase awareness of hate crime, prevent hate crime from happening, encourage reporting when it does happen. Although Community Safety Glasgow has a local focus on the city of Glasgow, the website includes information focused on hate crime that is useful nationally. The website aims to: Provide Victims and Witnesses with information and practical help Improve Hate Crime Reporting Promote Third Party Reporting Locate research, policy documents and publicly available statistics, in a single access point Give access to hate crime awareness raising and information resources Improve networking around hate crime Support activity to address hate crime across community safety partners What to do if you are the victim or witness to a hate crime If you experience or witness an incident that you perceive to be motivated by prejudice, we strongly encourage you to report it to the police. No matter how trivial or unimportant you may think it is, the police will take your complaint seriously and will record an incident when you choose to report it. You can report a non-emergency incident to the police: By calling 101 Through the on-line, hate crime reporting form on the Police Scotland website. https://www.scotland.police.uk/hate-crime/ Through a Third Party Reporting Site REMEMBER – ALWAYS CALL THE POLICE ON 999 IF YOU NEED IMMEDIATE HELP What is Third Party Reporting? Many people, for various reasons, are reluctant to report crime directly to the police. For hate crime victims and witnesses, there are often additional barriers to reporting. Third Party Reporting has been put in place to help victims and witnesses of hate crime overcome these barriers. You can report a hate crime without contacting the police in person, through a Third Party Reporting Centre. Third Party Reporting Centres are safe and supportive places where you can discuss an incident or concern. If you want to report an incident to the police, the Third Party Reporting Centre can do this on your behalf. The police act on this as if they had received the report directly from you. You can find out more about Third Party Reporting on our Report It page What happens next? The police will record the incident that you have reported and then carry out an initial investigation to determine whether the incident falls under the legal definition of a crime or breaches any statutes. If it does, it will then be recorded as a crime. The police will then carry out a crime investigation. This will involve interviewing victims, witnesses and suspects, looking at other sources of evidence such as CCTV footage or forensic evidence. If they believe they have enough evidence to support a prosecution they submit a report to the local Procurator Fiscal. The Procurator Fiscal (PF or Fiscal) works for the Crown Office and Procurator Fiscal Service (COPFS), which is the body responsible for prosecuting crime in Scotland. The Procurator Fiscal (PF) considers the police report and decides if there is sufficient evidence to proceed. If there is, the Procurator Fiscal will then decide what, if any, action it is appropriate to take. Actions range from prosecution in court, direct measures such as warnings, fiscal fines, compensation offers and social work diversion. The Procurator Fiscal can also decide to take no action. When this happens, the victim can ask for an explanation of the decision. If court proceedings are appropriate, the Procurator Fiscal will decide which court these should be taken in. This decision will depend on the nature of the offence, the sentencing powers of the respective courts and whether the accused has a criminal record.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by irissorg
Scoop.it!

Northern Irish women still facing difficult choice over abortion | World news | The Guardian

Northern Irish women still facing difficult choice over abortion | World news | The Guardian | Social services news | Scoop.it
Despite policy change by UK government offering them free abortion in England, women risk stigma and prosecution...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by irissorg
Scoop.it!

Elderly Scots urged to get flu jabs after winter death surge

Elderly Scots urged to get flu jabs after winter death surge | Social services news | Scoop.it
ELDERLY and vulnerable Scots are been urged to get their flu jab after new figures showed a surge in deaths last winter to an 18-year high.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by irissorg
Scoop.it!

Self Directed Support Collective Launch Tickets, Wed, 21 Nov 2018 at 11:30

Self Directed Support Collective Launch Tickets, Wed, 21 Nov 2018 at 11:30 | Social services news | Scoop.it
Launching of the SDS Collective in Glasgow: come and be part of improving SDS implementation across Scotland...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by irissorg
Scoop.it!

Children in Scotland

Children in Scotland | Social services news | Scoop.it
By bringing together a network of people working with and for children, alongside children and young people themselves, we offer a broad, balanced and independent voice. We create solutions, provide support and develop positive change across all areas affecting children in Scotland.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by irissorg
Scoop.it!

Are you a member of a union? – SSSC News

Are you a member of a union? – SSSC News | Social services news | Scoop.it
If we are investigating your fitness to practise and you’re facing an SSSC hearing we encourage you to have representation. Having someone to represent or support you, who knows and understands the procedures and formalities can help you. We’ve held almost 400 hearings in the past year and less than 40% of people had representation. Don’t leave it too late to join a union We hear from people who have been through the hearing process that they have tried to join a union so they can have help, but often it is too late to join at that point. We recommend that any worker who has to go through a hearing seeks independent advice about their case and the decisions they need to make. Your representative does not need to be legally qualified. The following people and organisations may be able to help: A trade union or professional body We advise that you become a member of a trade union. They can help with many work problems that you may have and you can contact them to see if they can help before trying to find help elsewhere. There might be a union representative in your workplace, or you might need to contact your local branch. It is not usually possible to join a union after a complaint has been made against you or a hearing is arranged. For that reason it is worth considering joining a union now. A solicitor There are many legal firms to choose from and you can search for a solicitor on their website: www.lawscot.org.uk/find-asolicitor/ You might also find it useful to search for a firm online using the words ‘SSSC solicitor’ or ‘regulatory lawyers in Scotland’. There is also help available from: Citizens Advice Scotland Law centres/clinics Faculty of Advocates You can find out more about these organisations as well as support for students and who you can talk to for emotional support here. Check your home insurance policy If you are worried about how you would be able to pay a solicitor’s fees, check whether you have legal cover through any of your home insurance policies. Legal cover is often included in policies and this may pay legal fees for employment matters – it’s worth checking. fitness to practise
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by irissorg
Scoop.it!

Integration Support

Integration Support | Social services news | Scoop.it
Sign up to the Engage and Inspire Newsletter The Integration support team has been commissioned by the Scottish Government to increase the third sector’s capacity to contribute to health and social care integration, particularly within strategic decision making processes.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by irissorg
Scoop.it!

Senior Regional Workforce Planning Lead job with NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde | 171569

Senior Regional Workforce Planning Lead job with NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde | 171569 | Social services news | Scoop.it
Senior Regional Workforce Planning Lead in Management and Business Skills, Healthcare with NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde. Apply Today.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by irissorg
Scoop.it!

Support available for families living with dementia

Support available for families living with dementia | Social services news | Scoop.it
A good package of care is different for everyone as it depends on what the person with dementia and their carer need. Find out about available support.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by irissorg
Scoop.it!

Leadership Development Assistant – SCVO

Leadership Development Assistant – SCVO | Social services news | Scoop.it
Enquire/ApplyPrint Organisation information Organisation Inclusion Scotland Charity registered in Scotland SC031619 Websitehttp://www.inclusionscotland.org Twitterhttps://twitter.com/InclusionScot Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/InclusionScotland Good HQ@InclusionScotland Aims & objectives Inclusion Scotland is run by disabled people ourselves. This is important because disabled people know best about the barriers that prevent our full inclusion into Scottish society. We experience them every day. But we cannot remove them by ourselves. We need allies and supporters. We need those in power to hear disabled people's voices and work with us to remove these barriers. We believe that people are not disabled because of a medical condition, but by barriers like: -Other people's negative attitudes and lack of awareness; -Inaccessible buildings, transport and communication methods; -Poverty arising from cuts to benefits, social care charges, extra costs, and discrimination by employers; -Services that should support us to live as full and equal citizens instead taking away our freedom, choice and control; and -Lack of information and power to make our voices heard. None of these barriers are inevitable - so neither are disabled people's inequality and exclusion. Independent Living We work to promote Independent living. This means all disabled people having the same freedom, choice, dignity and control as other citizens at home, at work and in the community. It does not necessarily mean living by yourself or fending for yourself. It means rights to practical assistance and support to participate in society and live an ordinary life. Human Rights We inform disabled people about their human rights and take action to embed them into policy, practice and everything we do. Co-production We promote co-production. Co-production means working with other groups with an interest in the subject, including whoever has the power to act. It means working as equal partners, from the start, before decisions are taken, in order to achieve an agreed outcome. Job number 9169 Location Edinburgh Time of attendance Flexible working hours No of references 1 Hours (per week) 25 Shifts/rota To be discussed with successful applicant Salary (£/hr) £8.75 per hour Job description The post holder will work with the Employability and Civic Participation Team (ECP) to support the development of the Access All Areas leadership network. As we deliver 30 internships per year and support many individuals through Access to Politics, we have built a diverse network of people who are engaged in wanting to make society more inclusive. As this work continues the opportunities for strengthening this network will grow. This means that we will need an enthusiastic individual to join our team to help us with the day to day organisation of this work. The role will involve creating and improving processes for managing data needed to carry out this work, and how we communicate it across the organisation. The post holder will take the lead on promoting the aims of this work throughout the organisation and raising its profile with colleagues, participants and support our work with external partner organisations. We hope that the post holder will help our team embed a culture of nurturing future leaders within the disabled people’s movement in Scotland. Alongside the core tasks there will be some flexibility in how the work is carried out. We would want to play to the strengths of the successful candidate, who may bring a variety of personal interests and skills which we have not accounted for in this job description. When completing your application you should tell us about anything that might be make you stand out. We have given some ideas in the person specification. • We also want to be inclusive to people who may not feel comfortable with some traditional ways of working such as phone calls, group work, travel etc. The work plan will account for the post holder’s working style and adjustment needs. • We will work with the post holder to develop a work plan that encourages their personal and professional development, and encourage mentoring, shadowing, networking and training opportunities. • Candidates don’t need to have lots of experience, but we want to get a good picture of you as an individual and what your passions are. • If the successful applicant is disabled, there will be no expectation on them to use their identity as a disabled person in the development of the role, or to be open about their own experiences as a disabled person but they may wish to. Many of our staff are disabled and all approach this in different ways. At the beginning of the placement we will have a frank discussion with the post holder about their boundaries and how they wish to communicate their adjustment needs. Main duties and responsibilities 1. Support and assist the development of the Access All Areas leadership network and help shape its longer term direction • Support colleagues in the design of the leadership network. This will be done through feedback and collaborative design with participants. • Raise the profile of the network and its aims within Inclusion Scotland by sharing good news stories in internal communications, online shared spaces and staff meetings • Support the Team Manager in fund raising around this work to expand the project by collecting information on the network and writing short reports on its progress • Support the Civic Participation Officer in investigating ways in which disabled people can influence change such as the potential of a “Disabled People’s Parliament” • Support the gathering of feedback from the network and share own ideas of how the work could be developed 2. Ensure good day to day running of Access All Areas by supporting the administration associated with the network • Support the development of the processes for communicating with members of the network, such as our database. • Take initial queries from colleagues about opportunities members can get involved in, ensuring that all the information is available so the best match can be found. • Support the practical side of getting members involved such as arranging reasonable adjustments, arranging meetings between participants and staff members who will support their involvement, and processing their expenses. 3. Support the Communications and Engagement Team by creating content for promoting Access All Areas and the work of the ECP team. • Work with the communications and engagement team to support the social media presence of the organisation, deciding what the priorities and key audiences are • Develop a work plan with the ECP team and the Communications and Engagement Team that meets the objectives of the organisation and has room for personal and professional development of the post holder. • Supporting the development of a style guide for social media and blogging that can be used by staff and members • Use “protected time” for this side of the work proportionate to the total number of hours the post holder is contracted for. • There is flexibility in how this work is carried out and the direction it takes, remaining in keeping with the business plan. 4. Support the wider work of the ECP team when required, such as events support, meet ups and sickness cover • Assist the team with the planning and delivery of events and smaller informal meet ups of the network • Support administration, organisation of meetings, coordination of diaries, communication and liaising with venues. • Be an ambassador for Inclusion Scotland by demonstrating our values and commitment to inclusion and the Social Model of Disability (This means that society is responsible for the barriers disabled people face, and should be responsible for providing solutions. Disability Equality Training will be provided.) • Carry out any other duties which support this work and are within the levels of responsibility of the post such as admin, taking part in team development, supporting other team’s events and our Annual General Meeting by note taking, facilitating or supporting attendees. (Any additional tasks outside of the post holder’s main work plan will be discussed thoroughly with them to ensure they are accessible to them. There will be no expectation on this post holder that they will do work outwith their job description but they may wish to as a development opportunity.) Person specification Values • A commitment to disabled people’s full inclusion in society • A commitment to working inclusively with people of all impairments, genders, cultural backgrounds, LGBTI identities, social backgrounds etc. • A desire to make positive change happen in society Essential knowledge, skills and experience Knowledge: • The barriers disabled people face and the Social Model of Disability • At least a basic awareness of how citizens can be involved in influencing change or a willingness to learn, including any personal experience of activism, political engagement, or campaigning. Skills and experience (Examples can include school, college or university education, volunteering, work or life experience) • Ability to manage your time and workload effectively to meet deadlines • Ability to effectively plan work using your own initiative (with support amd direction from your supervisors) • Good communication and interpersonal skills • Ability to form positive relationships with people members of the public, peers and professionals • Ability to work collaboratively as part of a team • Willingness to contribute ideas and constructively challenge ways of working • Willingness to advocate for the best interests of members even when colleagues may disagree • Willingness to work some evenings and weekends, with possible overnight stays (This would always be planned ahead with support where needed. If it was just not possible to do, then work would be planned to suit) Additional personal qualities, skills or experience. You do not need to demonstrate all of these but please tell us about any you do have experience of, or anything you think is relevant that we haven’t mentioned. • creative skills such as visual arts, film making, writing, reporting or creative engagement • social media use for telling stories, campaigning or networking • pre existing professional or social networks • administrative experience and keen eye for developing processes • experience of campaigning or promoting inclusion in any setting including school, college, university, your local community or for causes that are important to you. This may include speaking to politicians, community councils, being on boards, student politics, etc. • working face to face with people • an interest in research • group facilitation skills • interest in other protected characteristics or life experiences and how some disabled people experience barriers differently (such as LGBTI people, black and minority ethnic people, women, care leavers, financially excluded people, disabled people in residential care, people who are religious etc) Additional information The post is based in Edinburgh but may include some home working options as a reasonable adjustment and flexible working. You don't need to identify as disabled to apply, we welcome applicants from all backgrounds. PVG/disclosure requirements Required - Cannot start until successful Disclosure/PVG scheme membership is received
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by irissorg
Scoop.it!

New service to give social workers more time to work with those at risk | Norwich eye

New service to give social workers more time to work with those at risk | Norwich eye | Social services news | Scoop.it
County Hall – photo © the Eye Snapper   A new service launches tomorrow (October 17) that will improve how agencies in Norfolk work together to keep children safe. Norfolk County Council has created the new Children’s Advice and Duty Service to help ensure that all children are getting the right support, as soon as safeguarding concerns are raised. The new team of senior social workers will provide advice and support to other professionals who are worried about a child, talking through the risks and strengths within families and agreeing together who is best placed to meet the child’s needs. It will mean the end of written referrals and the creation of a new direct line to social workers. Elsewhere in the country, the approach has been successful in improving the experience of callers, and reducing unnecessary assessments, giving social workers more time to work with the families that really need their help. Cllr Stuart Dark, Acting Chairman of the Children’s Services Committee at Norfolk County Council, said: “We want our social workers to be spending their time working with families where they can make the greatest difference, whilst recognising that other agencies and other services can offer support too. This is a never do nothing approach. “At the moment we are doing too many unnecessary formal assessments where families do not need a social work service and this takes up valuable time and resources. This new approach, which supports our partners by providing expert advice, has worked well in other outstanding authorities. It will help us to keep children safe by giving social workers more time to work with those families where children are at real risk.” Norfolk County Council has been working with national expert Professor David Thorpe to develop the new service. Prof Thorpe has worked successfully with other high-performing councils in England, where both unnecessary assessments have reduced and local partners work together more successfully to meet the needs of children. The new service is one element of the council’s £12m transformation of Children’s Services, aimed at getting help to families earlier on, using evidence to better target services and reducing demand on social workers. The number of experienced social workers dealing with initial contacts and calls will increase as part of the new service, ensuring callers get straight through to a named social worker. The service will also have extended hours, running from 8am to 8pm. Elsewhere in the country partner agencies have supported the approach because they have welcomed the support and advice of a senior social worker at the outset. Moving to telephone conversations and away from written referrals means social workers can find out all the information they need early on, and families receive the help they need earlier. Members of the public who have concerns about the safety of a child should continue to call the same number 0344 800 8020. If it as emergency, dial 999.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by irissorg
Scoop.it!

The Sense of an Ending: stories, meanings and understanding.

The Sense of an Ending: stories, meanings and understanding. | Social services news | Scoop.it
Kristian Pollock, Professor of Medical Sociology, School of Health Sciences, University of Nottingham. Kirstian Pollock has carried out qualitative research in a wide range of health care settings. Her current research interests include medicines management and Anticipatory Prescribing at the end of life, Advance Care Planning, death, dying and dementia. She is a member of the Nottingham Centre for the Advancement of Research into Supportive, Palliative and End of Life Care (NCARE). Christian Busch, Hospital Chaplain, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen. Christian Busch has been a minister for the last 35 years, including two years as a prison chaplain and 32 years as hospital chaplain in two hospitals in Copenhagen. For the last 29 years he has worked as hospital chaplain in the main University Hospital of Copenhagen, Rigshospitalet. Palliative care has been one of his main focuses during the years as a hospital chaplain. He was one of the founders of the Danish Multiprofessional Association for Palliative Care in 1990 and a member of the board until 2002 and also a member of the Nordic Association for Palliative Care from 1989 – 2000 and for seven years Chairman of the Board. He has been active in the planning group and scientific committee of several conferences and congresses on palliative care in Denmark and the Nordic countries. He has published in textbooks and journals mostly in Danish and 2003–2011 he was a member of the board of editors for OMSORG. Nordic Journal of Palliative Medicine, Bergen, Norway. From 2013 – 2015 he has been a Project Manager of Bereavement support groups in the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Denmark. Most of all he is fond of the daily existential and spiritual conversations with patients and relatives. Paul Gray, Director General for Health and Social Care for the Scottish Government and Chief Executive of NHSScotland Paul Gray joined the Scottish Government in 1979. He was appointed Director General for Health and Social Care for the Scottish Government and Chief Executive of NHSScotland in December 2013. He has held a range of senior roles in the Scottish Government, including Director General Rural Affairs, Environment and Services; Director General Governance & Communities; Director of Change and Corporate Services; Director of Primary and Community Care; Director of eHealth; and Director for Social Justice. His career has also covered such diverse areas as Criminal Injuries Compensation, fisheries quota management and licensing, and work with Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Education. Deans Buchanan, Consultant in Palliative Medicine, Ninewells Hospital, Dundee Deans trained in medicine at the University of Glasgow and also undertook a BSc (Hons) in pharmacology. He completed his medical doctorate from the University of Dundee in 2010 on the unmet supportive care needs of lung cancer patients. Following his specialist training in Palliative Medicine in Tayside, he was appointed to a Consultant post there in 2011. He is currently Lead Clinician for NHS Tayside Palliative Care and played a key role in the recent establishment of the Tayside Palliative and End of Life Care network. In addition to this, he is the Co-director of the Master of Public Health (Palliative Care Research) programme at the University of Dundee and is an honorary clinical tutor for the University of Dundee. Deans joined the Council of the Scottish Partnership for Palliative Care in 2014. Donald Macaskill, Chief Executive, Scottish Care Dr Donald Macaskill is the Chief Executive of Scottish Care. Scottish Care is the membership organisation of independent providers of care home and care at home/housing support services in Scotland. Numbering nearly 1000 organisations Scottish Care members employ over 100,000 staff. Prior to his current role, Dr Macaskill ran an equality and human rights consultancy for fourteen years. In that time, he focused on issues such as adult protection and safeguarding, workplace and institutional discrimination and the role of human rights in social care. He has a particular professional and academic interest in human rights-based approaches to care and support, personalisation, bereavement and palliative care. Since his arrival at Scottish Care, palliative care and bereavement have become a key strategic area of the organisation. See http://www.scottishcare.org/innovation/supporting-solace/ Paul Baughan, Clinical Lead for Palliative and End of Life Care, Healthcare Improvement Scotland Dr Paul Baughan is a GP principal who has worked within the rural community of Dollar, Clackmannanshire for the past 21 years. He is also Healthcare Improvement Scotland's clinical lead for palliative and end of life care. In 2003 he took up the post of ‘Macmillan Lead Cancer and Palliative Care GP’ for NHS Forth Valley. From 2007 to 2011 he was the primary care clinical lead for the West of Scotland Cancer Network and from 2011 to 2014 he was chair of the Scottish Primary Care Cancer Group. He sits on the Transforming Care After Treatment (TCAT) national steering group and is an elected member of the Scottish Partnership for Palliative Care’s Council. He co-chaired the national palliative care guideline steering group. Paul has a particular interest in the important role that GPs can play in supporting people with palliative and end of life care needs. It is one of the reasons why he chose General Practice as a career and he is eager to ensure that current pressures within primary care do not undermine this. Jacqui Graves, Human Rights Lead, Sue Ryder Jacqui is a highly experienced Registered General Nurse and Nurse Manager with extensive knowledge and skills developed over 33 years across the National Health Service, Charitable and Private Investment Sector. Jacqui has worked in the field of oncology since 1999 and has had the privilege to support many people affected by cancer to the end of their lives and to die well. Jacqui is currently leading a three year project to design, deliver and evaluate a training programme called “What Matters to Me”: a human rights approach to end of life, working closely with subject experts from British Institute of Human Rights. Fiona Finlay, Consultant in Palliative Medicine, Queen Elizabeth University Hospital Fiona trained in medicine at the University of Nottingham. She completed her palliative medicine training in NHS Tayside in 2014 and was appointed as a consultant at the Queen Elizabeth University Hospital in 2016. As a registrar she completed a Master of Public Health (Palliative Care Research) degree. Her dissertation was a symptom prevalence study of outpatients with cirrhosis. She is currently local Principal Investigator of a multi-site feasibility study looking at integrating palliative medicine with gastroenterology care in people with end stage liver disease.   Lynsey Fielden, Consultant Geriatrician, NHS Forth Valley Lynsey Fielden has been a consultant geriatrician in NHS Forth Valley since 2013 and more recently hospital palliative lead since 2016 in addition to her clinical commitments. She is a specialist in movement disorders and is passionate about anticipatory care planning, education and patient safety. Lynsey has been leading the first ReSPECT process (Recommended Summary Plan for Emergency Care and Treatment ) pilot in Scotland. Hazel Woodland, Hepatology Registrar and Clinical Research Fellow Hazel is a Gastroenterology Speciality Trainee working in the Severn Deanery and is currently taking time out of training in order to complete a two-year research project. Her research focuses on improving end of life care for patients with chronic liver disease and she is Chief Investigator on a multi-centre feasibility study investigating the acceptability and impact of early integration of palliative care into the management of patients with advanced liver disease. She is also examining the experiences of lay carers of patients with this condition and exploring their experiences of accessing healthcare. Finally, she is collaborating with Public Health England in order to identify discrepancies that may exist in the care given to patients with liver disease from different socioeconomic backgrounds in their last year of life. Juliet Spiller, Consultant in Palliative Medicine, Marie Curie Hospice Edinburgh Dr Juliet Spiller is a consultant in Palliative medicine working at the Marie Curie Hospice in Edinburgh. An interest in supporting good practice in decision-making, documentation and communication of Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (DNACPR) decisions came from leading local policy work in NHS Lothian in 2006. This became the basis for the NHS Scotland DNACPR policy which was launched in 2010 and revised in 2016 in line with UK legislative and good-practice changes. Through this policy development experience Juliet has become involved in eHealth work relating to accessible emergency care information, Realistic Medicine, and anticipatory care planning in Scotland. She is co-chair of the Expert Working Group for the UK-wide ReSPECT process (Recommended Summary Plan for Emergency Care and Treatment). Other clinical and research interests include delirium, psychological interventions, and medical acupuncture. Brodie Paterson, Emergency Medicine Consultant, NHS Tayside Mr Brodie Paterson is an Emergency Medicine Consultant with NHS Tayside and flight physician with East Anglian Air Ambulance. His research interests include head injuries, care of the dying patient and organ and tissue donation. The Ninewells Emergency Department cares for approximately 60 patients per year in the final hours of life in the ED observation ward and developed the process in conjunction with the hospital palliative care team. . Book a place The conference costs £145, with a reduced rate for £105 for employees of member organisations. (A list of member organisations is available here: SPPC members.) To book a place at the conference, please follow this link: SPPC conference bookings Download the programme here: SPPC Annual Conference Programme 2018
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by irissorg
Scoop.it!

Quarriers sees living wage perks in 'huge step' for sector

Quarriers sees living wage perks in 'huge step' for sector | Social services news | Scoop.it
ONE of Scotland’s leading health and social care charities has become accredited as a living wage employer, ensuring that more than 1000 workers…...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by irissorg
Scoop.it!

Men who care: attracting men into the caring professions

Men who care: attracting men into the caring professions | Social services news | Scoop.it
Attracting men into the caring professions faces some societal challenges but there is a movement to encourage more men into caring roles...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by irissorg
Scoop.it!

Scottish Government ‘may have underestimated health care funding by £400m’

Scottish Government ‘may have underestimated health care funding by £400m’ | Social services news | Scoop.it
An economist has said the Scottish Government may have underestimated healthcare funding needs by more than £400 million. Economist John McLaren criticised the government’s recent paper on its medium-term financial framework for health and social care, for what he claims is a lack of clarity. He raised concerns over “untenable” discrepancies between the government’s estimates of its future funding needs for healthcare and those detailed in an independent assessment for the healthcare system in England. The report states: “The best like-for-like comparison suggests that the Scottish Government estimate is for around 3.5% annual, cash terms, funding needs growth over the next five years, as compared to around 6.7% estimated for England. “Such a discrepancy seems untenable. The funding implications differ by over £400 million a year, moving from an extra £455 million being needed at 3.5%, to over £870 million being needed at 7%.” His analysis here is based on a modernisation option for England, which he claims is the best fit for the Scottish aspirations for improvement. Mr McLaren also cast doubt on the forecast efficiency savings in the Scottish Government paper of 1.3%, above what he claims is the best comparison of 0.8% in the English analysis. However, in this analysis he uses the status quo option for England rather than modernisation, which would put both countries roughly equal at a projected 1.4% for England. He said: “The Scottish Government’s recently published medium term financial plans for health and social care do not allow for a clear picture to emerge of future funding needs. “This confusingly presented document appears to suggest that Scottish funding needs in this area are considerably below those estimated for England. “It is difficult to see why this would be the case. “In addition, projected efficiency savings are anticipated to be higher for Scotland than for the UK and heighten the degree of over-optimism that seems to pervade the report. “Much more clarity is needed in this vital area of government funding as well as further analysis than has hitherto been undertaken.” Scottish Labour’s health spokeswoman Monica Lennon said: “This report should be taken seriously by the SNP government. “If such a gap exists, it would raise serious concerns about the funding of our NHS. “The SNP must ensure that the health service has the resources it needs to help staff deliver the care patients deserve.” A Scottish Government spokesman said: “Our health spending per head is over 7% higher than the UK as a whole - amounting to over £850 million more spending on health services for Scotland. “Our financial framework, which has been welcomed across the service and by independent experts, outlines both investment in and reform of our health and social care sector.”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by irissorg
Scoop.it!

Better home care for older people | Quick guides for social care | Social care | communities | About

Better home care for older people | Quick guides for social care | Social care |  communities | About | Social services news | Scoop.it
A quick and easy-to-read guide to the standard of care you should expect from a home care provider....
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by irissorg
Scoop.it!

Director of Care and Learning retires | The Highland Council

Director of Care and Learning retires - Director of Care and Learning retires...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by irissorg
Scoop.it!

Strengths-based social care: Children, young people and families

Strengths-based social care: Children, young people and families | Social services news | Scoop.it
Strengths-based approaches to social care for children, young people and families and their effectiveness.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by irissorg
Scoop.it!

Best Practices for Integrated Health and Social Care in Scotland

Best Practices for Integrated Health and Social Care in Scotland | Social services news | Scoop.it
How Michael Porter's Value Agenda best practices can help the Scottish Government achieve their vision of an integrated Health and Social Care system.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by irissorg
Scoop.it!

Calls for Angus care model to be rolled out across Scotland

Calls for Angus care model to be rolled out across Scotland | Social services news | Scoop.it
The Scottish Government has been urged to roll out an Angus care model across the country to end the “postcode lottery” facing patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by irissorg
Scoop.it!

Children's Commissioner concerned at 50,000 kids living in 'toxic households'

Children's Commissioner concerned at 50,000 kids living in 'toxic households' | Social services news | Scoop.it
Around 50,000 vulnerable young children are living in households with a "toxic trio" of domestic abu...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by irissorg
Scoop.it!

Care at home - What does a personal carer do? | Falkirk Council

Care at home - What does a personal carer do? | Falkirk Council | Social services news | Scoop.it
The role of a personal carer is one of the most important jobs in the community today. In everything they do, they need to think about the care and support they provide from the service user's point of view, so that their rights and choices are always respected. By supporting service users to carry out everyday tasks, personal care workers make a big difference to their lives. They: Support people to live independently at home to maintain their individuality and self esteem Enable people to stay in familiar surroundings, to take part in their usual activities Help to maintain service users' health and wellbeing through the support they offer Support people to make their own decisions about day-to-day life Provide social contact; a friendly face and a chat can be important for everyone, especially those who live on their own Helping other carers such as service users' family members to continue to care for their loved one. The work is very rewarding, but it is complex and can sometimes be challenging. As well as common sense, kindness and good humour, personal carers will need to develop a range of professional skills, knowledge and personal attributes. They must: Be open minded to support people from different backgrounds, cultures and lifestyles Understand different conditions and how they affect people Report any signs of ill-health or changes in a person’s wellbeing to their supervisor Practice patience to help people do as much as possible for themselves rather than doing things for them Help people to carry out intimate or personal tasks in a sensitive manner Need to be dependable and arrive as punctually as you can Know what to do in an emergency and prepare for the unexpected. To find out about available Personal Carer jobs visit the MyJobScotland website.
more...
No comment yet.