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The importance of explaining yourself

The importance of explaining yourself | Social services news | Scoop.it
There is a ‘Little Britain’ sketch that stands out for me and it is the one of the computer saying no, because it so cleverly and clearly explains what it can feel like for a customer/patient/user to be confronted with a job worth system.
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Men who care: attracting men into the caring professions

Men who care: attracting men into the caring professions | Social services news | Scoop.it
Attracting men into the caring professions faces some societal challenges but there is a movement to encourage more men into caring roles...
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Scottish Government ‘may have underestimated health care funding by £400m’

Scottish Government ‘may have underestimated health care funding by £400m’ | Social services news | Scoop.it
An economist has said the Scottish Government may have underestimated healthcare funding needs by more than £400 million. Economist John McLaren criticised the government’s recent paper on its medium-term financial framework for health and social care, for what he claims is a lack of clarity. He raised concerns over “untenable” discrepancies between the government’s estimates of its future funding needs for healthcare and those detailed in an independent assessment for the healthcare system in England. The report states: “The best like-for-like comparison suggests that the Scottish Government estimate is for around 3.5% annual, cash terms, funding needs growth over the next five years, as compared to around 6.7% estimated for England. “Such a discrepancy seems untenable. The funding implications differ by over £400 million a year, moving from an extra £455 million being needed at 3.5%, to over £870 million being needed at 7%.” His analysis here is based on a modernisation option for England, which he claims is the best fit for the Scottish aspirations for improvement. Mr McLaren also cast doubt on the forecast efficiency savings in the Scottish Government paper of 1.3%, above what he claims is the best comparison of 0.8% in the English analysis. However, in this analysis he uses the status quo option for England rather than modernisation, which would put both countries roughly equal at a projected 1.4% for England. He said: “The Scottish Government’s recently published medium term financial plans for health and social care do not allow for a clear picture to emerge of future funding needs. “This confusingly presented document appears to suggest that Scottish funding needs in this area are considerably below those estimated for England. “It is difficult to see why this would be the case. “In addition, projected efficiency savings are anticipated to be higher for Scotland than for the UK and heighten the degree of over-optimism that seems to pervade the report. “Much more clarity is needed in this vital area of government funding as well as further analysis than has hitherto been undertaken.” Scottish Labour’s health spokeswoman Monica Lennon said: “This report should be taken seriously by the SNP government. “If such a gap exists, it would raise serious concerns about the funding of our NHS. “The SNP must ensure that the health service has the resources it needs to help staff deliver the care patients deserve.” A Scottish Government spokesman said: “Our health spending per head is over 7% higher than the UK as a whole - amounting to over £850 million more spending on health services for Scotland. “Our financial framework, which has been welcomed across the service and by independent experts, outlines both investment in and reform of our health and social care sector.”
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Better home care for older people | Quick guides for social care | Social care | communities | About

Better home care for older people | Quick guides for social care | Social care |  communities | About | Social services news | Scoop.it
A quick and easy-to-read guide to the standard of care you should expect from a home care provider....
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Director of Care and Learning retires | The Highland Council

Director of Care and Learning retires - Director of Care and Learning retires...
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Strengths-based social care: Children, young people and families

Strengths-based social care: Children, young people and families | Social services news | Scoop.it
Strengths-based approaches to social care for children, young people and families and their effectiveness.
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Best Practices for Integrated Health and Social Care in Scotland

Best Practices for Integrated Health and Social Care in Scotland | Social services news | Scoop.it
How Michael Porter's Value Agenda best practices can help the Scottish Government achieve their vision of an integrated Health and Social Care system.
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Calls for Angus care model to be rolled out across Scotland

Calls for Angus care model to be rolled out across Scotland | Social services news | Scoop.it
The Scottish Government has been urged to roll out an Angus care model across the country to end the “postcode lottery” facing patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.
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Children's Commissioner concerned at 50,000 kids living in 'toxic households'

Children's Commissioner concerned at 50,000 kids living in 'toxic households' | Social services news | Scoop.it
Around 50,000 vulnerable young children are living in households with a "toxic trio" of domestic abu...
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Care at home - What does a personal carer do? | Falkirk Council

Care at home - What does a personal carer do? | Falkirk Council | Social services news | Scoop.it
The role of a personal carer is one of the most important jobs in the community today. In everything they do, they need to think about the care and support they provide from the service user's point of view, so that their rights and choices are always respected. By supporting service users to carry out everyday tasks, personal care workers make a big difference to their lives. They: Support people to live independently at home to maintain their individuality and self esteem Enable people to stay in familiar surroundings, to take part in their usual activities Help to maintain service users' health and wellbeing through the support they offer Support people to make their own decisions about day-to-day life Provide social contact; a friendly face and a chat can be important for everyone, especially those who live on their own Helping other carers such as service users' family members to continue to care for their loved one. The work is very rewarding, but it is complex and can sometimes be challenging. As well as common sense, kindness and good humour, personal carers will need to develop a range of professional skills, knowledge and personal attributes. They must: Be open minded to support people from different backgrounds, cultures and lifestyles Understand different conditions and how they affect people Report any signs of ill-health or changes in a person’s wellbeing to their supervisor Practice patience to help people do as much as possible for themselves rather than doing things for them Help people to carry out intimate or personal tasks in a sensitive manner Need to be dependable and arrive as punctually as you can Know what to do in an emergency and prepare for the unexpected. To find out about available Personal Carer jobs visit the MyJobScotland website.
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Closing residential rehabs only increases the suffering of addicts | Will Self | Society | The Guardian

Closing residential rehabs only increases the suffering of addicts | Will Self | Society | The Guardian | Social services news | Scoop.it
Places like Chandos House in Bristol, which shuts next month, represent a genuine mechanism through which compassion can operate...
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Lecturer In Mental Health at Edinburgh Napier University

Lecturer In Mental Health at Edinburgh Napier University | Social services news | Scoop.it
Further Your Career as a Mental Health Lecturer with Edinburgh Napier University Why join us? Edinburgh Napier is one of the largest providers of nursing and midwifery education in Scotland; with a further significant profile across the wider UK and a strong transnational education portfolio. Uniquely, in Scotland, the School offers pre-registration midwifery and all four fields of practice in nursing: adult, child health, mental health and learning disabilities. We are also about to launch new pre-registration programmes in allied health and social work. Our simulation and clinical skills centre is our flag ship. The facility is diverse ranging from a critical care unit and clinical ward to a home environment. We have a team of teaching associates that support the teaching of clinical skills using state of the art technology and equipment. Click here for a virtual tour of the School clinical skills facility We are committed to growing our academic reputation and providing an unrivalled student experience. The School is structured into several themes that signify our areas of strength and growth, these consist of programmes of education, research, enterprise (CPD and Consultancy) and professional practice. The mental health theme consists of multidisciplinary academics delivering innovative teaching and impactful research. We have expertise in suicide prevention, mental health legislation, decision making and heuristics, psychosocial interventions, mindfulness, maternal mental health, substance (mis)use psychosis, complex PTSD and diagnostics, therapeutic relationships and interdisciplinary collaboration, including the police. We are looking for an enthusiastic lecturer to join this theme group. You will be joining a friendly and energetic team focused on making lives better for people with mental health issues. Though this is a full time position, we are happy to consider candidates for part time opportunities – we would encourage you to get in touch ahead of applying if this is something you would like to discuss. Who Are We Looking For? The successful candidate will be mainly responsible for the delivery of contemporary, practice-based education and scholarly activity across our pre-registration degree and Masters programmes. Candidates will be ambitious and enthusiastic about cross-disciplinary and collaborative working across the University and with our specialised industry partners, including the NHS. Essential to this position is a Doctoral qualification (for Grade 6), or Masters qualification (for grade 5), and a current active membership with the NMC or equivalent. Further, you will have experience of innovative practice-related, research informed teaching and/or training with an interest and expertise in mental health nursing. Please see our full role profiles here: Grade 5 Lecturer Role Profile (£32,236 - £38,460 per Annum) Grade 6 Lecturer Role Profile (£39,609 - £48,677 per Annum) Edinburgh Napier University is committed to the creation of an inclusive culture. How Will We Reward You? The University offers an extensive personal benefits package, as well as discounted membership to our innovative gym & leisure facilities at the Sighthill campus. Further information regarding our excellent benefits can be found here. Interviews will likely be held in late November 2018 For informal enquiries please email: Professor Austyn Snowden, Head of Mental Health Theme at a.snowden@napier.ac.uk Associate Professor Nadine Dougall, Deputy Head of Mental Health Theme at n.dougall@napier.ac.uk or Pam Logan, Mental Health Nursing Programme Leader at p.logan@napier.ac.uk
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Experts meet to discuss new ways to save lives and reduce strain on health and care services this winter

Experts meet to discuss new ways to save lives and reduce strain on health and care services this winter | Social services news | Scoop.it
Leading fuel poverty charity National Energy Action (NEA) has released a report into how the health and housing sectors can work together to tackle cold-related ill health. The report is being released at a conference hosted by the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy and the...
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Northern Irish women still facing difficult choice over abortion | World news | The Guardian

Northern Irish women still facing difficult choice over abortion | World news | The Guardian | Social services news | Scoop.it
Despite policy change by UK government offering them free abortion in England, women risk stigma and prosecution...
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Elderly Scots urged to get flu jabs after winter death surge

Elderly Scots urged to get flu jabs after winter death surge | Social services news | Scoop.it
ELDERLY and vulnerable Scots are been urged to get their flu jab after new figures showed a surge in deaths last winter to an 18-year high.
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Self Directed Support Collective Launch Tickets, Wed, 21 Nov 2018 at 11:30

Self Directed Support Collective Launch Tickets, Wed, 21 Nov 2018 at 11:30 | Social services news | Scoop.it
Launching of the SDS Collective in Glasgow: come and be part of improving SDS implementation across Scotland...
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Children in Scotland

Children in Scotland | Social services news | Scoop.it
By bringing together a network of people working with and for children, alongside children and young people themselves, we offer a broad, balanced and independent voice. We create solutions, provide support and develop positive change across all areas affecting children in Scotland.
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Are you a member of a union? – SSSC News

Are you a member of a union? – SSSC News | Social services news | Scoop.it
If we are investigating your fitness to practise and you’re facing an SSSC hearing we encourage you to have representation. Having someone to represent or support you, who knows and understands the procedures and formalities can help you. We’ve held almost 400 hearings in the past year and less than 40% of people had representation. Don’t leave it too late to join a union We hear from people who have been through the hearing process that they have tried to join a union so they can have help, but often it is too late to join at that point. We recommend that any worker who has to go through a hearing seeks independent advice about their case and the decisions they need to make. Your representative does not need to be legally qualified. The following people and organisations may be able to help: A trade union or professional body We advise that you become a member of a trade union. They can help with many work problems that you may have and you can contact them to see if they can help before trying to find help elsewhere. There might be a union representative in your workplace, or you might need to contact your local branch. It is not usually possible to join a union after a complaint has been made against you or a hearing is arranged. For that reason it is worth considering joining a union now. A solicitor There are many legal firms to choose from and you can search for a solicitor on their website: www.lawscot.org.uk/find-asolicitor/ You might also find it useful to search for a firm online using the words ‘SSSC solicitor’ or ‘regulatory lawyers in Scotland’. There is also help available from: Citizens Advice Scotland Law centres/clinics Faculty of Advocates You can find out more about these organisations as well as support for students and who you can talk to for emotional support here. Check your home insurance policy If you are worried about how you would be able to pay a solicitor’s fees, check whether you have legal cover through any of your home insurance policies. Legal cover is often included in policies and this may pay legal fees for employment matters – it’s worth checking. fitness to practise
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Integration Support

Integration Support | Social services news | Scoop.it
Sign up to the Engage and Inspire Newsletter The Integration support team has been commissioned by the Scottish Government to increase the third sector’s capacity to contribute to health and social care integration, particularly within strategic decision making processes.
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Senior Regional Workforce Planning Lead job with NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde | 171569

Senior Regional Workforce Planning Lead job with NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde | 171569 | Social services news | Scoop.it
Senior Regional Workforce Planning Lead in Management and Business Skills, Healthcare with NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde. Apply Today.
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Support available for families living with dementia

Support available for families living with dementia | Social services news | Scoop.it
A good package of care is different for everyone as it depends on what the person with dementia and their carer need. Find out about available support.
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Leadership Development Assistant – SCVO

Leadership Development Assistant – SCVO | Social services news | Scoop.it
Enquire/ApplyPrint Organisation information Organisation Inclusion Scotland Charity registered in Scotland SC031619 Websitehttp://www.inclusionscotland.org Twitterhttps://twitter.com/InclusionScot Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/InclusionScotland Good HQ@InclusionScotland Aims & objectives Inclusion Scotland is run by disabled people ourselves. This is important because disabled people know best about the barriers that prevent our full inclusion into Scottish society. We experience them every day. But we cannot remove them by ourselves. We need allies and supporters. We need those in power to hear disabled people's voices and work with us to remove these barriers. We believe that people are not disabled because of a medical condition, but by barriers like: -Other people's negative attitudes and lack of awareness; -Inaccessible buildings, transport and communication methods; -Poverty arising from cuts to benefits, social care charges, extra costs, and discrimination by employers; -Services that should support us to live as full and equal citizens instead taking away our freedom, choice and control; and -Lack of information and power to make our voices heard. None of these barriers are inevitable - so neither are disabled people's inequality and exclusion. Independent Living We work to promote Independent living. This means all disabled people having the same freedom, choice, dignity and control as other citizens at home, at work and in the community. It does not necessarily mean living by yourself or fending for yourself. It means rights to practical assistance and support to participate in society and live an ordinary life. Human Rights We inform disabled people about their human rights and take action to embed them into policy, practice and everything we do. Co-production We promote co-production. Co-production means working with other groups with an interest in the subject, including whoever has the power to act. It means working as equal partners, from the start, before decisions are taken, in order to achieve an agreed outcome. Job number 9169 Location Edinburgh Time of attendance Flexible working hours No of references 1 Hours (per week) 25 Shifts/rota To be discussed with successful applicant Salary (£/hr) £8.75 per hour Job description The post holder will work with the Employability and Civic Participation Team (ECP) to support the development of the Access All Areas leadership network. As we deliver 30 internships per year and support many individuals through Access to Politics, we have built a diverse network of people who are engaged in wanting to make society more inclusive. As this work continues the opportunities for strengthening this network will grow. This means that we will need an enthusiastic individual to join our team to help us with the day to day organisation of this work. The role will involve creating and improving processes for managing data needed to carry out this work, and how we communicate it across the organisation. The post holder will take the lead on promoting the aims of this work throughout the organisation and raising its profile with colleagues, participants and support our work with external partner organisations. We hope that the post holder will help our team embed a culture of nurturing future leaders within the disabled people’s movement in Scotland. Alongside the core tasks there will be some flexibility in how the work is carried out. We would want to play to the strengths of the successful candidate, who may bring a variety of personal interests and skills which we have not accounted for in this job description. When completing your application you should tell us about anything that might be make you stand out. We have given some ideas in the person specification. • We also want to be inclusive to people who may not feel comfortable with some traditional ways of working such as phone calls, group work, travel etc. The work plan will account for the post holder’s working style and adjustment needs. • We will work with the post holder to develop a work plan that encourages their personal and professional development, and encourage mentoring, shadowing, networking and training opportunities. • Candidates don’t need to have lots of experience, but we want to get a good picture of you as an individual and what your passions are. • If the successful applicant is disabled, there will be no expectation on them to use their identity as a disabled person in the development of the role, or to be open about their own experiences as a disabled person but they may wish to. Many of our staff are disabled and all approach this in different ways. At the beginning of the placement we will have a frank discussion with the post holder about their boundaries and how they wish to communicate their adjustment needs. Main duties and responsibilities 1. Support and assist the development of the Access All Areas leadership network and help shape its longer term direction • Support colleagues in the design of the leadership network. This will be done through feedback and collaborative design with participants. • Raise the profile of the network and its aims within Inclusion Scotland by sharing good news stories in internal communications, online shared spaces and staff meetings • Support the Team Manager in fund raising around this work to expand the project by collecting information on the network and writing short reports on its progress • Support the Civic Participation Officer in investigating ways in which disabled people can influence change such as the potential of a “Disabled People’s Parliament” • Support the gathering of feedback from the network and share own ideas of how the work could be developed 2. Ensure good day to day running of Access All Areas by supporting the administration associated with the network • Support the development of the processes for communicating with members of the network, such as our database. • Take initial queries from colleagues about opportunities members can get involved in, ensuring that all the information is available so the best match can be found. • Support the practical side of getting members involved such as arranging reasonable adjustments, arranging meetings between participants and staff members who will support their involvement, and processing their expenses. 3. Support the Communications and Engagement Team by creating content for promoting Access All Areas and the work of the ECP team. • Work with the communications and engagement team to support the social media presence of the organisation, deciding what the priorities and key audiences are • Develop a work plan with the ECP team and the Communications and Engagement Team that meets the objectives of the organisation and has room for personal and professional development of the post holder. • Supporting the development of a style guide for social media and blogging that can be used by staff and members • Use “protected time” for this side of the work proportionate to the total number of hours the post holder is contracted for. • There is flexibility in how this work is carried out and the direction it takes, remaining in keeping with the business plan. 4. Support the wider work of the ECP team when required, such as events support, meet ups and sickness cover • Assist the team with the planning and delivery of events and smaller informal meet ups of the network • Support administration, organisation of meetings, coordination of diaries, communication and liaising with venues. • Be an ambassador for Inclusion Scotland by demonstrating our values and commitment to inclusion and the Social Model of Disability (This means that society is responsible for the barriers disabled people face, and should be responsible for providing solutions. Disability Equality Training will be provided.) • Carry out any other duties which support this work and are within the levels of responsibility of the post such as admin, taking part in team development, supporting other team’s events and our Annual General Meeting by note taking, facilitating or supporting attendees. (Any additional tasks outside of the post holder’s main work plan will be discussed thoroughly with them to ensure they are accessible to them. There will be no expectation on this post holder that they will do work outwith their job description but they may wish to as a development opportunity.) Person specification Values • A commitment to disabled people’s full inclusion in society • A commitment to working inclusively with people of all impairments, genders, cultural backgrounds, LGBTI identities, social backgrounds etc. • A desire to make positive change happen in society Essential knowledge, skills and experience Knowledge: • The barriers disabled people face and the Social Model of Disability • At least a basic awareness of how citizens can be involved in influencing change or a willingness to learn, including any personal experience of activism, political engagement, or campaigning. Skills and experience (Examples can include school, college or university education, volunteering, work or life experience) • Ability to manage your time and workload effectively to meet deadlines • Ability to effectively plan work using your own initiative (with support amd direction from your supervisors) • Good communication and interpersonal skills • Ability to form positive relationships with people members of the public, peers and professionals • Ability to work collaboratively as part of a team • Willingness to contribute ideas and constructively challenge ways of working • Willingness to advocate for the best interests of members even when colleagues may disagree • Willingness to work some evenings and weekends, with possible overnight stays (This would always be planned ahead with support where needed. If it was just not possible to do, then work would be planned to suit) Additional personal qualities, skills or experience. You do not need to demonstrate all of these but please tell us about any you do have experience of, or anything you think is relevant that we haven’t mentioned. • creative skills such as visual arts, film making, writing, reporting or creative engagement • social media use for telling stories, campaigning or networking • pre existing professional or social networks • administrative experience and keen eye for developing processes • experience of campaigning or promoting inclusion in any setting including school, college, university, your local community or for causes that are important to you. This may include speaking to politicians, community councils, being on boards, student politics, etc. • working face to face with people • an interest in research • group facilitation skills • interest in other protected characteristics or life experiences and how some disabled people experience barriers differently (such as LGBTI people, black and minority ethnic people, women, care leavers, financially excluded people, disabled people in residential care, people who are religious etc) Additional information The post is based in Edinburgh but may include some home working options as a reasonable adjustment and flexible working. You don't need to identify as disabled to apply, we welcome applicants from all backgrounds. PVG/disclosure requirements Required - Cannot start until successful Disclosure/PVG scheme membership is received
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New service to give social workers more time to work with those at risk | Norwich eye

New service to give social workers more time to work with those at risk | Norwich eye | Social services news | Scoop.it
County Hall – photo © the Eye Snapper   A new service launches tomorrow (October 17) that will improve how agencies in Norfolk work together to keep children safe. Norfolk County Council has created the new Children’s Advice and Duty Service to help ensure that all children are getting the right support, as soon as safeguarding concerns are raised. The new team of senior social workers will provide advice and support to other professionals who are worried about a child, talking through the risks and strengths within families and agreeing together who is best placed to meet the child’s needs. It will mean the end of written referrals and the creation of a new direct line to social workers. Elsewhere in the country, the approach has been successful in improving the experience of callers, and reducing unnecessary assessments, giving social workers more time to work with the families that really need their help. Cllr Stuart Dark, Acting Chairman of the Children’s Services Committee at Norfolk County Council, said: “We want our social workers to be spending their time working with families where they can make the greatest difference, whilst recognising that other agencies and other services can offer support too. This is a never do nothing approach. “At the moment we are doing too many unnecessary formal assessments where families do not need a social work service and this takes up valuable time and resources. This new approach, which supports our partners by providing expert advice, has worked well in other outstanding authorities. It will help us to keep children safe by giving social workers more time to work with those families where children are at real risk.” Norfolk County Council has been working with national expert Professor David Thorpe to develop the new service. Prof Thorpe has worked successfully with other high-performing councils in England, where both unnecessary assessments have reduced and local partners work together more successfully to meet the needs of children. The new service is one element of the council’s £12m transformation of Children’s Services, aimed at getting help to families earlier on, using evidence to better target services and reducing demand on social workers. The number of experienced social workers dealing with initial contacts and calls will increase as part of the new service, ensuring callers get straight through to a named social worker. The service will also have extended hours, running from 8am to 8pm. Elsewhere in the country partner agencies have supported the approach because they have welcomed the support and advice of a senior social worker at the outset. Moving to telephone conversations and away from written referrals means social workers can find out all the information they need early on, and families receive the help they need earlier. Members of the public who have concerns about the safety of a child should continue to call the same number 0344 800 8020. If it as emergency, dial 999.
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Inverclyde Council | National Award for Compassionate Inverclyde

National Award for Compassionate Inverclyde Tuesday 16 October 2018 An Inverclyde project changing attitudes and behaviour around death, dying and loneliness has won a national award for outstanding quality of service. Compassionate Inverclyde - the first compassionate community in Scotland – has been recognised at the COSLA Excellence Awards 2018. The project is a partnership between Inverclyde Health & Social Care Partnership (HSCP) and Ardgowan Hospice and has brought together hundreds of volunteers supporting and caring for one another at times of crisis and loss. Inverclyde Council’s Health & Social Care Convener Councillor and Chair of Compassionate Inverclyde Robert Moran said: “I would like to congratulate everyone involved with Compassionate Inverclyde for this thoroughly deserved award. “Their work is changing lives on a daily basis and delivering opportunities for people to help each other.  “This award is clear recognition of those efforts and send out the message that we all have something to give and can play a part in supporting those affected by death and bereavement.” Community engagement and development has been carried out across all age groups and organisations within Inverclyde involving schools, churches, workplaces, community centres, hospital, local hospice, youth groups and voluntary organisations. Inverclyde Royal Hospital has become the first hospital in Scotland to have the No One Dies Alone (NODA) programme. Local people were concerned about many people living and dying on their own. Volunteers provide support to those in their final hours who do not have family or friends available to be with them. Another idea developed from speaking to people in the community has been Back Home Boxes containing basic essentials for people living alone leaving hospital. The 2018 COSLA Excellence Awards honoured eight Scottish Councils and their partners. Describing this year’s entries as inspiring, COSLA President Councillor Alison Evison said: “These winners sum up what Scottish Local Government is all about- innovative and joined up services, delivered by passionate staff, that are changing lives every day. “We have witnessed some incredible projects, and their results are already being felt across the country.   “Above all, I’ve been struck by the sheer determination to work with communities to meet their needs and to set new standards of excellence, whatever the challenges.  “The COSLA Excellence Awards are helping to build on real life success stories like these and share their learning.   Where these projects are leading, others will follow, and all those who took part should be very proud indeed.”   Now in their 19th year, the COSLA Excellence Awards are the most established and largest of their kind Full details of all the award winners can be found via the link on this page. The overall winners were announced following a three-stage judging process which narrowed down over 240 submissions. The Awards Ceremony is part of the 2018 COSLA and Improvement Service Conference.   Entitled ‘Our Agenda’ it explores why in today’s uncertain world Local Government’s distinct agenda is so important. Photograph: (LtoR) Sally Loudon, Chief Executive Officer, COSLA; Jill McInnes, Ardgowan Hospice; Gillian Robb, Inverclyde Health & Social Care Partnership (HSCP); Gillian Maxwell, Amazon; Karen Haldane, Your Voice, Louise Long, Corporate Director Inverclyde HSCP; Councillor Robert Moran, Inverclyde Council; Jackie Bird   Page last updated: 16 October 2018
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New Horizons: The Arts and Children in Challenging Circumstances | The Garage

New Horizons: The Arts and Children in Challenging Circumstances | The Garage | Social services news | Scoop.it
Dr Matthew Hill, Head of Research and Learning and Deputy Director Matt leads the Centre’s work evaluating open access youth services. His work develops the latest practice in impact measurement including digital collection of footfall data, systematic user feedback loops, peer-to-peer observations of quality delivery and developing a shared framework for open access provision. Matt also leads the Centre’s partnership with Ambition to co-develop their strategy and approach to embedding meaningful impact measurement, both within Ambition itself and across its membership. ​Matt joined the Centre in June 2017 having previously worked within NCVO’s Institute for Volunteering Research specialising in evaluations of youth volunteering programmes including vinvolved, City Year, National Citizen Service and International Citizen Service. He also has a PhD in Social Policy and guest lectures on UCL’s MSc in Public Policy. Philip Flood, Director, Sound Connections  Philip Flood has been Director at Sound Connections since 2010 and is responsible for the overall strategy, finances and governance of the charity. In March 2018 Sound Connections was awarded four-year strategic funding from the National Foundation for Youth Music and is part of the Alliance for a Musically Inclusive England, a collective of 14 leading music organisations working together to promote diversity and cultural democracy in music education. Philip also leads on all major partnerships and a number of consultancy projects. Recent clients have included Andrew Lloyd Weber Foundation, Arts Council England, Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra, City of London Sinfonia, Gabrieli, Greater London Authority, Saffron Hall, Wigmore Hall and numerous Music Education Hubs across England. Previously, he was Head of LSO Discovery, the education and learning programme for the London Symphony Orchestra, and prior to this, Education Director for Spitalfields Music and Head of Music and Media at a large inner-London Further Education college. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, an advisor for the PRS for Music Foundation and a Trustee of the Music Education Council, the umbrella body for organisations connected with music education in the United Kingdom. Lucy Marder, Strategic Manager, Artswork Lucy joined national Youth Arts charity Artswork in April 2018 as Strategic Manager for the Hampshire, Isle of Wight, Portsmouth and Southampton area, working as part of the senior team leading on the delivery of the Arts Council England-funded Bridge role across the South East. Lucy’s diverse experience includes launching the art galleries of two Museum of the Year award-winners, commissioning new work from artists and developing youth and community arts. After a decade in museums, Lucy diverted for 20 years into the world of leadership and organisational development, helping charity, public sector, and corporate clients to find their focus, embrace change and be more effective in dynamic and challenging times in the UK and then Australia. Career highlights include launching a pioneering multi-agency centre in remote rural Southern Tasmania, bringing everything from alternative sixth form provision to a magistrate’s court to a library all together under one roof. The centre has become a model for similar provision across Tasmania and in other Australian states. Lucy returned to the arts in 2013, joining the South East Museum Development Programme as Museum Development Officer and then working as Cultural Partnerships Officer from 2015, supporting museums to work collaboratively with one another, with other arts organisations and with other sectors, e.g. health, and to work internationally. A lifelong learning fanatic, Lucy holds a BA(Hons) in History of Art (First Class), Diploma in Art Gallery and Museum Studies, MBA, Certificate in Social Enterprise Support, Diploma in Leadership Mentoring and Executive Coaching, plus a host of certifications in project management, training and assessment and other things that are useful in helping to bring the best out of people and organisations. Kay is currently working with the national team at Arts Council England supporting their strategic work with children and young people with a focus on education. She has over 20 years’ experience leading programmes in the arts, education, and environment sector. She is particularly interested in work that addresses inequalities of access and creates social change. For the last six years she has been Head of Learning at Nottingham Contemporary; an international art gallery with a strong local focus. Here she was involved in depth with “Circuit”; an action research programme working with young people aged 15- 25 years old, 10 Tate galleries and The Paul Hamlyn Foundation. As well as her interest in arts and culture with children and young people, Kay set up “The Loudspeaker Programme” in 2013 supporting women with multiple and complex needs through the arts. Previous arts education experience was at the Royal Academy of Dance and Laban Centre London. She has a teaching degree in Secondary School Drama and is a Governor of a Secondary School Academy.   I am PC Nichola Jessop and I have been a police officer for twenty three years. My current role is as a Safer Schools Officer working at The Hewett Academy and Sewell Park Academy. My role involves working with the schools to ensure safeguarding of the students and also an early intervention role to try to encourage those students who have made the wrong choice to get back on the right path and not become persistent offenders. As a team we deliver Key Constabulary Messages to all high schools in the county around internet safety, healthy relationships, CSE, teenage relationship abuse and knife crime. During my career I have worked the front line in the West of the county, been a detective on the Child Abuse Investigation team and in CID. This has given me a wide range of experience which enables me to carry out my current job. For the past six months I have been the SPOC for County Lines within the Safer Schools Team and worked to safeguard some of the most vulnerable young people in Norfolk.   Anna Dever, Family Arts Campaign Manager As Manager for the Family Arts Campaign, Anna leads a national cross-sector initiative to raise family engagement in Arts and Culture. As one of Arts Council England’s Sector Support Organisations, the Campaign facilitates sector collaboration to meet the needs of families as well as raise awareness of cultural opportunities available to families through the Fantastic for Families programme.  Through the Family Arts Campaign, Anna works with and supports senior leaders within organisations by providing thought leadership and networking opportunities through the Campaign’s learning and events programme.  Anna’s role in the Campaign helps to support organisations to improve their family provision through the accreditation and guidance programmes, The Family Arts Standards and The Age Friendly Standards.  Prior to the Family Arts Campaign, Anna has worked for the reading charity BookTrust and devised and led national programmes to get families and children reading for pleasure. Anna also has experience in leading international cultural projects through her work at the British Council and has a passion for accessible arts and culture for all people of all ages.   Deborah Bullivant, Founding Director of Grimm & Co, a charity changing lives, one story at a time) in Yorkshire Deborah is an educationalist, creative and social entrepreneur who built Grimm & Co on a bedrock of robust research that set out the design and philosophy blueprint for a successful Yorkshire writing centre, based in Rotherham for children and young people. A background that spans across all fields of education, starting as family learning tutor, then as headteacher before going on to national roles leading on quality in education. Specialising in literacy, Deborah’s consistent focus is on creative educational approaches to narrow the gap for marginalised children, young people and adults. Deborah's own career path has not followed the traditional routes but has equipped her with insider experience of tackling the steep learning curve that she draws on. Deborah has the MEd in Educational Management and MEd in Literacy and Language with the University of Sheffield and is currently finalising research for the EdD. Grimm & Co: The magical apothecary has been supplying evil plots, wild schemes and kitchenware to magical beings of all types (even those of a wicked persuasion) since 1148 (just before lunchtime), going visible to mortals on 29th February 2016. Hidden behind the shelves of wonder, an imagination gym puts your brain through its paces before climbing the giant bookcase to the ‘writers’ pad’. Here the true magic takes place as children and young people’s hidden writing persona is revealed, all leaving as wordsmiths down the magical beanstalk back to the mortal world.   Brigitte Hyde - Restorative Approaches Coordinator, Children’s Services, NCC I’m an experienced and accredited trainer in restorative practice and have a long history of working in Norfolk’s Youth Offending Team. I plan, organise and deliver sessions to various organisations from schools to children’s home, prisons and multi-agency groups. I’m passionate about restorative practice and along with training, I also support organisations to embed RA into their teams, because we know it works. Restorative Practice is a fascinating field to be working in and because it’s about relationships and how people interact, I’m constantly learning on the job which is a privilege. Kavina Upadhyay, Learning & Youth Support Manager, The Roundhouse Kavina Upadhyay is the Learning & Youth Support Manager at the Roundhouse – a hub of inspiration in Camden where artists and emerging talent create extraordinary work and where young people can grow creatively as individuals. Kavina has worked extensively across the charity sector for the last ten years, almost exclusively with a focus on young people. At the Roundhouse, she oversees the pastoral offer for young people aged 11 to 25 which includes developing inclusive practices and access to Roundhouse studios and projects. A large part of her role is to ensure that young people’s voices are being represented across the creative and artistic programmes. Part of this is leading and developing the Roundhouse Youth Advisory Board (RYAB) as well as supporting the recruitment and development of the two Young Trustees that sit on the Roundhouse’s Board of Trustees. Further to that, Kavina is also leading the Entry-Level Workforce Strategy at the Roundhouse, developing and growing the trainee and apprentice offer there.   Ayesha Charles I am a young creative, fighting for the right to the arts and aiming to achieve clear diversity within. An actress at The National Youth Theatre and Lyric Young Company as well as The Roundhouse. The Roundhouse has completely supported me in all my endeavours new and old. I first joined the Roundhouse in 2016 on a verbatim theatre course and went on to become a Youth Advisory Board Member and now a Young Trustee. As my career choices have changed throughout the years there has always been a programme that offers the true helping hand that we all hope for. I cherish the values that The Roundhouse hold, one of which being that all young people are truly wanted rather than needed. The Roundhouse is a welcoming hub for the youth and I love that I can continue adding to the wonderful vision it provides. My core aim is to ensure that all people can be allowed to have the freedom to a creative story like mine. Tom Fox is a theatre practitioner and director. His work crosses disciplines such as improvisation, movement and music. He is Artistic Director of Lamphouse Theatre Company, based in Peterborough, and former Young Company Practitioner at Royal and Derngate Theatres, Northampton. Lamphouse Theatre tell epic stories in intimate settings, packed with live music, comedy and spontaneity. They perform with a playful mischief and create events accessible to all who attend and participate in them. They are committed to breaking down barriers with communities who do not often experience theatre. They work with engagement and learning institutions across the country to raise awareness of the power of creativity. As a freelance director, Tom has also worked at the National Theatre, Theatre 503, Traverse Theatre, Young Vic and Eastern Angles. His outreach and participation work has been commissioned by Creative Partnerships, Norfolk and Norwich Bridge, the Royal Society of Arts, Lakeside Arts Centre, Nottingham, Peterborough Presents and Small Nose Productions. Tom has worked on several large scale productions and projects with young people, including directing the Big Production at The Garage for the last two years. Paul Webb is MAP’s Participation Youth Work Services Manager. Paul has been involved in youth work for over 15 years, working for both voluntary and statutory organisations in Cambridgeshire and Norfolk. Paul currently manages a team of youth workers for MAP in Norfolk who work across the county delivering projects that emphasise early action, being young person centred, youth led and encouraging the active participation of young people. Paul is particularly passionate about the core values of youth work and supporting young people to have a voice and more importantly use it to make positive change for themselves and others. Nicola Gratton Nic is the Lead for Cultural and Community Engagement at Staffordshire University.  She specialises in participatory action research, creative research techniques and community development and leads on a number of projects which involve local people in the research or evaluation process.  Nic teaches on a range of short courses including Participatory Action Research and Youth and Community work. She was the chair of the social impact strand for Stoke-on-Trent's bid to be City of Culture 2021 and was a core member of the bidding team.  As part of this work she coordinated the community consultation for the bid and nurtured and facilitated the SOTogether Community Advisory Network for people who lived, worked or studied in the city to influence decision making about the City of Culture bid.  Nic also manages the evaluation for Appetite (a large scale arts project in Stoke-on-Trent) and leads on the development of a Connected Communities Framework for Staffordshire University and the Cultural Observatory in partnership with Keele University.  Nic has over 20 years experience as a youth and community worker, manager, trainer and consultant. Jonathon Cockerill I have been in post working as the MASH Education Representative since January 2018 and have responsibilities liaising with partners in the Norfolk Multi Agency Safeguarding Hub (MASH) around Education, providing advice, support and guidance around Safeguarding to Schools and Education settings and other partner agencies which include Police, Children Services and Health. I have overall responsibility for Operation Encompass for Children’s Services in Norfolk, which is the Domestic Abuse disclosure Scheme to Schools. Previous to this role I worked as a Police Community Support Officer for Norfolk Constabulary for four and half years with my main role during this time working as Safer Schools Officer working within High Schools in West Norfolk providing advice, support and guidance to students and staff. Through both roles I have a good knowledge and experience of working and dealing with a range of safeguarding incidents including young persons who have been or at risk of being exploited. Carla Hamilton is an Operational Manager in the Norfolk Youth Offending Team (Norfolk YOT) and holds responsibility for the new multi-agency Child Criminal Exploitation pilot project hosted by Norfolk YOT. Prior to this Carla had responsibility for the Harmful Sexual Behaviour work of Norfolk YOT and worked alongside the Harmful Sexual Behaviour Project Team – specifically in relation to developing interventions to address high risk sexual and harmful behaviours in adolescents. Carla has undertaken extensive training in Harmful Sexual Behaviour assessment and interventions and has a particular interest, knowledge and skill in working with young people convicted of sexual offences. Carla is an experienced youth worker by background and started her work with children and young people by volunteering for Norfolk YOT as a community panel member and subsequently worked for the Youth Service for a number of years. Carla specialises in working with high risk adolescents and has a wealth of experience from her time as a youth worker and as a front-line practitioner and manager in the Norfolk YOT. In 2016 she joined the Norfolk YOT Great Yarmouth team as an Operational Manager and moved to the Norwich team as Operational Manager in 2017. During this time, she has been involved in and taken an interest in the issue of child criminal exploitation and subsequently moved into her current secondment. Karen Smeed I presently work for Prospects as the Senior Youth Support Worker for the Norfolk Connect Project, which is working with the early help teams across Norfolk. I cover the Great Yarmouth area, and the project is early intervention to engage young people in sustainable activities. The role of engaging young people into meaningful and sustainable activities has its challenges and barriers that we have to work through, but the majority of referrals have to date been successful. I previously worked for a charity called Mcch for 22 years doing a variety of roles from a Day Service Officer in a day centre for adults with learning disabilities and autism, then was seconded to the employment advisor across all of the Day services in Bexley. I was then redeployed to one of their social enterprises called Tuck by truck in Herne Bay Kent, which was an employment focussed service and a training scheme. I managed a team of 8 core staff, along with the employment of 36 individuals with learning disabilities, autism and/or mental health issues. Their role was delivering snack trays to customers and this was their first step into employment. I became manager of the service within 3 years of working there and went on to win several awards; Kent partnership awards, Kent healthy business award in excellence and the National disability award for employer of the year. I also qualified in level 5 QCF in social care and leadership and completed the ILM management training certification. Jess Read I work for Prospects as a Youth Support Apprentice for the Norfolk Connect Project which is works with Early Help teams across Norfolk. I support all the youth workers to support young people into positive activities. I’m part of The Guinea Pig group which is a experts experienced group project developed by Learning Development working in partnership with Children’s Services and young people. The group helps professionals find out if a service is working correctly by asking young people. Every piece of work or project proposal comes down to what young people think will work best. I’ve supported a range of professionals though the network (schools, police, social work and early help teams) who have all seen the positive outcomes of young people’s engagement.  I was a Member of Norfolk Youth Parliament between 2016 – 2018 representing the North Norfolk area. During my time I took part in a variety of projects locally in Norfolk and nationally. I contributed towards the success of Norfolk Youth Parliament’s Make Your Mark consultation. Make Your Mark is a youth consultation that aims to identify young people’s priorities and give them the opportunity to have their voices heard. I represented Norfolk’s young people at the UK Youth Parliament debate in the House of Commons. I also stood up for the views of Norfolk’s young people at the Youth Parliament’s nation conference at the University of Liverpool, by debating on Raising Aspirations in rural areas and protecting the rights of LGBTQ+ people. Nina Fine is a Singer-Songwriter, Music Leader, Wired4Music Trustee and co-founder of Women In Jazz community space and platform. Recently selected for Spitalfields Music Leader Traineeship 2018 and participating in Young and Serious 2018 programme, Nina is passionate about facilitating accessible opportunities in the arts for young people and working with impactful organisations to achieve this. Her other roles include Communications Coordinator for Sofar Sounds London and Music Journalist for EZH jazz platform.   Nicky Adamson Following a successful London-based career in commercial non-fiction publishing as a commissioning editor and publicist, Nicky has worked for over 20 years in the cultural sector. She has strong experience of managing and delivering cultural programmes for and with local authorities and third sector organisations, and has a particular interest in and knowledge of the role of creativity in social regeneration. Full-time posts included Director of Arts Development In East Cambridgeshire, Arts Generate Programme Manager for Thurrock Council and the founding Director of The Garage, the young people’s performing arts training and development centre in Norwich (2005-08). Between 2008 and 2016 she concentrated on freelance consultancy work, widening her portfolio to include external evaluation, project management, fundraising and strategic development for a range of clients, including Norfolk County Council, UK Centre for Carnival Arts in Luton, Vivacity in Peterborough plus clients in North Yorkshire and Nottinghamshire. She has also worked for the Royal Opera House Bridge, as well as project management assignments in London for community arts organisations Parrabbola and the Bureau of Silly Ideas. Most recently she has undertaken an audit of music-making opportunities for children and young people in Norfolk on behalf of Norfolk Music Hub (with Parrabbola), and an assessment of cultural opportunities and engagement in both schools and their own time for children and young people in Milton Keynes, on behalf of the MK Arts and Heritage Alliance. Between November 2016 and July 2017 Nicky covered the post of Programme Manager (Norfolk and Suffolk) while the postholder was on shared parental leave. She returned to take up the permanent post of Senior Manager: Research & Development.
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