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Children in care total rises 12% in four years

Children in care total rises 12% in four years | Social services news | Scoop.it
Figures show more than 68,000 taken in by social services, with 42,000 having suffered abuse or neglectThe number of children in council care in England has risen by 12%, with overall costs calculated at £3.4bn.
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North Ayrshire Council to end "spare room" barrier to new foster families

North Ayrshire Council to end "spare room" barrier to new foster families | Social services news | Scoop.it
A council is to allow people to foster children who need a home even if they don’t have a spare room for them to sleep in, in a Scottish first…...
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Social Work: Events : Newly Qualified Social Worker Conference

Social Work: Events : Newly Qualified Social Worker Conference | Social services news | Scoop.it
Newly Qualified Social Worker Conference Title Newly Qualified Social Worker Conference Speaker(s) Hosted by: Social Work # University of Edinburgh Date and Time 31st May 2018 09:00 - 31st May 2018 16:10 Location 50 George Square, EH8 9JU The theme of the NQSW Conference is 'Building the future: Shaping our social work identity'. The NQSW Conference is a free event. To register go to Eventbrite at: https://nqsw2018.eventbrite.co.uk Venue: 50 George Square, University of Edinburgh Date: 31st May 2018 NQSW Conference programme : 09:00                               Stalls open and refreshments 09.30 – 9:50                 Registration & Workshop sign up 9:50 – 10.20                 Welcome & Introductions:                                            Professor Viv Cree, The University of Edinburgh (Conference Chair)                                           Jane Johnstone, Professional Social Work Adviser Scottish Government                  10.25 -10.40                 Key note Speaker:                                             Susan Taylor, Past President of Social Work Scotland 10.45 -11.45                Choose a Workshop                                            Choose a workshop for the morning session and one for the afternoon session. 11:50 – 12.20              Update: NQSW RESEARCH                                            Presented Martin Kettle 12.20 – 13.10              Lunch 13.10 - 13.50              Updates                                           Review of Social Work Education & NQSW development Anne Tavendale - SSSC                                                     Workforce  Development and Planning Advice 14.00 - 15.00             Choose a Workshop 15.00 – 15.15            Comfort break 15.15- 16.00              Jo McFarlane                                          Presented by Jo McFarlane                                         Jo McFarlane is a poet who has lived in Edinburgh all her life and studied languages and                                           philosophy and gained a postgraduate degree in Community Education at the University of                                          Edinburgh. Jo tells how her artistic side helped her  conquer the mental illness that                                          threatened to destroy her.               16.00 – 16.10            Closing words:          Professor Viv Cree
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WEBINAR Integrated Care Matters: A Community Approach to Palliative and end of Life Care Tickets, Wed, 16 May 2018 at 12:00

WEBINAR Integrated Care Matters: A Community Approach to Palliative and end of Life Care Tickets, Wed, 16 May 2018 at 12:00 | Social services news | Scoop.it
Eventbrite - International Foundation for Integrated Care presents WEBINAR Integrated Care Matters: A Community Approach to Palliative and end of Life Care - Wednesday, 16 May 2018 - Find event and ticket information.
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Could you become a foster carer in North Ayrshire?

Could you become a foster carer in North Ayrshire? | Social services news | Scoop.it
Could you become a foster carer in North Ayrshire?
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Towards an enhanced understanding of suicide risk in men at University of Glasgow on FindAPhD.com

PhD Project - Towards an enhanced understanding of suicide risk in men at University of Glasgow, listed on FindAPhD.com...
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Self-management | Healthcare System | Buurtzorg | Integral European Conference

Self-management | Healthcare System | Buurtzorg | Integral European Conference | Social services news | Scoop.it
The self-management model of Buurtzorg is proving effective in large systems like the UK's National Health Service and other local centers.
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Care Appointments | Guidance: New social work practice resource for working with people suffering hearing loss

Today, to mark the start of Deaf Awareness Week, the British Association of Social Workers (BASW) ha...
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Diagnosis and early stages - Young onset dementia - SCIE

Young onset dementia: Diagnosis and early stages Early signs of young onset dementia Often, the early signs of dementia in a younger person are attributed wrongly to stress, depression, bereavement or normal ageing. Interestingly, loss of memory may not be the first change the person notices or complains about. Instead, they may find they are sleeping more, for example, or becoming uncharacteristically short-tempered or disinterested in things around them. The first year we found out about dad’s dementia was incredibly difficult. No one knew what was going on. It was such a relief when we found out the diagnosis. John Brady, son of Ian Brady, Alzheimer’s Society ‘Living with dementia newsletter’, June 2010 Some people lose their judgement about what is appropriate. Lynn Jackson was in her mid-40s working in a ‘dream job’ in Mexico City when she was diagnosed with fronto-temporal dementia. She had to give up her job when the dementia caused her to swear excessively at work (this disinhibited behaviour is a feature of fronto-temporal dementia). Lynn went on to set up Dementia Advocacy Support Network International (DASNI) – a worldwide organisation run by and for those diagnosed with dementia (for more on this, see the feature, ‘Living with young onset dementia’ in this section). Often a person notices a change in their ability to do something that they had always done quite easily. For example, one young man has described the impact of diminishing cognitive function on his ability to teach: I was struggling at work. I was losing track and losing control of the class which is something I had never done. I became disorganised, which again is something I have never done. Dementia: Out of the shadows, Alzheimer’s Society 2008 The case for obtaining a diagnosis Research suggests that the average life expectancy for a person when diagnosed with dementia is between four and eight years. Given this, and the potential for misunderstanding and stress caused by the early signs of dementia – particularly within a family and with colleagues at work – it is important that a person is assessed and given a diagnosis as early as possible. In England and Wales ideally this process takes place in a memory clinic with specialist medical staff and health professionals who are trained to diagnose dementia and treat and support those affected. The 2009 National Dementia Strategy for England has emphasised the importance of memory clinics as a key way of ensuring early diagnosis, and so the number and quality of these services are likely to increase in the coming years. Individuals and family members may feel a sense of relief when they learn the diagnosis. For many people, it can help to know what’s wrong so they are better placed to plan for the future. Difficulties getting a diagnosis A 2008 Alzheimer’s Society report quotes one GP saying to a female patient, You can’t have dementia, you’re too young. This quote reveals that doctors and other professionals quite often may not even consider that a person under 65 could have dementia – they may be more likely to think there is nothing wrong or that the person is depressed. In many areas, it may be unclear which medical consultant is responsible for the assessment and diagnosis of young onset dementia (also called ‘early onset dementia’ or ‘working life dementia’) – should it be a psychiatrist working with adults with mental health problems, or should it be an old age psychiatrist who specialises in working with older adults? GPs may not know this information. For all these reasons, obtaining a diagnosis is often a particularly drawn-out and distressing process for younger people. Support at the point of diagnosis Someone in their 40s or 50s does not expect to become forgetful and confused and then be told they have a progressive terminal condition such as dementia. For many younger people with dementia and their families, this is a very traumatic time, when feelings of uncertainty, grief and loss are particularly acute. Watch SCIE Social Care TV video Young onset dementia: living at home with nursing support. In this video Jim talks about the painful process that eventually saw his wife, Jan, be diagnosed with young onset Alzheimer’s. The person and their spouse may well need counselling or extra emotional support to cope with the diagnosis. Counselling is available on the NHS but a younger person with dementia would only be referred for this if they were showing signs of severe anxiety and/or depression, which they may well be. Some families may seek private counselling or perhaps more commonly turn to a charity like the Alzheimer’s Society for emotional support. The Alzheimer’s Society’s factsheet 445 Talking therapies (including counselling, psychotherapy and CBT) has more information on this. There are a growing number of community-based services specifically for younger people with dementia, which provide emotional support. For more on this, see the feature, ‘Services and support for younger people’ in this section. Making plans for the future When a person learns that they have dementia, they will often begin planning for their future in formal ways, as well as making plans for holidays and family time. For a person who is working and has substantial financial commitments – perhaps a mortgage, pension, life insurance and so on – a diagnosis of dementia will mean a drastic change of circumstances. The advice of a financial adviser could help. A person can give a named individual (attorney) the power to make specific decisions on their behalf if there comes a time when they are unable to make them themselves. This is known as a Lasting Power of Attorney. There are two types: one relates to property and affairs, the other to personal welfare (including medical treatment). For more on this area, see the feature on ‘Advance care planning’. Living arrangements Each person’s living arrangements will vary: some will live alone, some with a partner or spouse, and perhaps school-age children too. Spouses and partners may or may not be able to take on a full-time caring role, given other commitments such as work and ageing parents. According to research, a person who lives alone is more likely to move into a care home sooner than someone who lives with their spouse or carer. Each person and their family members will deal with the condition and support each other in different ways. Driving A person’s capacity to control a vehicle safely does decline if they have dementia. Once someone has been diagnosed with dementia they are legally obliged to tell the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Authority (DVLA) of their condition. The diagnosed person then has to take a driving test each year in order to continue driving a car. Inevitably there comes a point when a person with dementia has to stop driving, either because they find it too stressful or because they lose confidence and/or the ability to do so. No longer being able to drive can be a catastrophe for many younger people and their families, especially those living in rural areas where public transport networks are more limited. Research from America suggests that if a person with dementia is no longer able to drive this is likely to lead to less social contact and a sense of loss. Voting The voting rights of people with dementia are often overlooked. A younger person with early dementia may still want to vote in national and/or local elections. As long as the person understands the process and consequence of voting, and can choose candidates, they have a right as a citizen to do so. Building a new life after diagnosis Despite the progressive and terminal nature of dementia, many people do find ways to cope with the diagnosis and get on with their lives. Some people find a sense of purpose after diagnosis through joining with others to campaign for a better deal for people with dementia (for more on this see the feature ‘Living with young onset dementia’ in this section). Others prefer to carry on doing things they have always done such as gardening, going to the pub or fishing. It is important that a younger person has the chance to try something new. Some might want to explore their creative side and become artists or singers. Others may want to try something more active and adventurous (like hill walking or even zip wiring!), visit a place they have never been, or take on a new role or responsibility (such as volunteer). The point is to help the person find an activity that is meaningful for them and to assist them to do it. Downloads All SCIE resources are free to download, however to access the following downloads you will need a free MySCIE account: Available downloads: QCF Mapping: Diagnosis and early support for younger people Activity: Diagnosis and early stages for younger people What the research says: Early onset dementia Further reading Open Alzheimer's Society (2008) Dementia: Out of the shadows, London: Alzheimer's Society. Alzheimer's Society (2010) 'Family ties', Living with dementia magazine, June. Alzheimer's Society (2012) 'Talking therapies (including counselling, psychotherapy and CBT)', London: Alzheimer's Society. Wislowski, A. (2006) 'Voting rights for older Americans with dementia: implications for health care providers', Nursing Outlook, vol 54, pp 68–73. Useful links Open Alzheimer’s Society The Alzheimer’s Society produces over 80 factsheets on all sorts of topics related to dementia, including What is young-onset dementia (440), Explaining dementia to children and young people (515) and Rarer causes of dementia (442). It has also published a position statement on What is young-onset dementia?, maintains a database of services for younger people with dementia, and has a forum within its online community, Talking Point (for people with dementia and their carers), specifically for younger people with dementia. Rare Dementia Support Rare Dementia Support is a specialist support service for people living with or affected by one of five rare dementia diagnoses: familial Alzheimer’s disease, frontotemporal dementia, familial frontotemporal dementia, posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) and primary progressive aphasia (PPA). The service offers support group meetings, telephone contact networks, websites and access to information and advice and is based at the Dementia Research Centre at UCL’s Institute of Neurology. It was previously known as the Fronto-temporal Dementia Support Group. FTD talk The aim of this website from scientists at University College London is to make frontotemporal dementia (FTD) easy to understand for anyone with an interest in FTD. The site includes a dozen factsheets related to various aspects of FTD, available to download for free. YoungDementia UK This Oxford-based service offers care and support for younger people with dementia and their families. It was begun by Helen Beaumont whose husband Clive had young onset dementia. The YoungDementia UK website has information on young onset dementia. Younger people with dementia: living well with your diagnosis This substantial 2013 resource from NHS Health Scotland was developed in partnership with younger people with dementia and carers and covers a range of key information areas (such as home, health, independence, work and money) and includes links for finding out further information. Related pages from this section Open Young onset dementia SHARE: Part of: Dementia Last updated: May 2015
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Digital Health and Social Care Learning Network day 24 May 2018

Digital Health and Social Care Learning Network day  Dundee University, 10am-4pm  #digicare4scot The Learning Network day The Scottish Centre for Telehealth and Telecare, NHS24 & Scottish Government Technology Enabled Care (TEC) 2017 Learning Network day will take place on the 24th of May. 2017 SCTT Learning  Network Day Ebook   Attendees  Come along and find out more about digitally enabled health and care services in Scotland.  250 delegates attended the 2017 Learning Network day.  Staff attend from sectors including: health, social care, housing, voluntary sector, research, policy, technology and academia.  This event is free to attend.​   Programme By popular demand we will have the 5-minute snapshot presentations from Learning Network members, the programme will also feature a range workshops on topics of interest to those working on digitally enabled health and care services.  ​ To view the 2017 snapshots, go to: https://app.video3.co.uk/ Sign in using the username scttguest@video3media.co.uk and password welcome1234 then click on Videos   Exhibitors The chance to meet delegates, to build new relationships and get feedback is something that the attendees and the exhibitors value. The exhibition space is at the heart of the venue and feedback from the 2017 event was very positive. Check link please. Sponsorship packages are very reasonably priced and there are a range of different sponsorship opportunities. If you wish the range of sponsorship opportunities contact Victoria Wyness at SHSC Events ​victoria.wyness@nhs.net   We hope to see you on May 24 2018.
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The 10-year strategy for the health and care workforce

The 10-year strategy for the health and care workforce | Social services news | Scoop.it
Which issues need to be considered when formulating the new NHS and social care workforce strategy? Here, Richard Murray gathers ideas from a recent roundtable event at the Fund.
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Care Appointments | Services tackling obesity, sexual health and addiction cut in 90% of councils

Care Appointments | Services tackling obesity, sexual health and addiction cut in 90% of councils | Social services news | Scoop.it
Ninety percent of councils have cut funding to weight management, sexual health and addiction servic...
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'Urgent change' needed to improve lives of ME sufferers

Scotland's only nurse specialising in myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) has called for urgent change to help improve the lives of at least 20,000…...
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Ayr Part-Time Support Practitioner (32hr) - FEMALE DRIVER ONLY - Turning Point Scotland

Ayr Part-Time Support Practitioner (32hr) - FEMALE DRIVER ONLY - Turning Point Scotland | Social services news | Scoop.it
Ref No: 452. Vacancy: Ayr Part-Time Support Practitioner (32hr) - FEMALE DRIVER ONLY. Salary: £16,258 - £17,727. Location: Ayrshire.Closing Date: 28/05/2018 23:55...
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Looking after yourself when you're a carer | Parkinson's UK

Looking after yourself when you're a carer | Parkinson's UK | Social services news | Scoop.it
Looking after yourself when you're a carer Caring for someone with Parkinson's can be challenging. This information looks at how you can make sure you are taking care of yourself and your wellbeing. If you're busy caring for someone, it may be difficult to look after your own physical and mental health. But recognising your own needs will help you balance caring with the rest of your life. It's important to access all of the available help and support for people with Parkinson's and their carers. Having a good quality of life will benefit you and the person you care for. Keeping a diary can be a useful tool to keep track of what you're doing as a carer. You can then refer to this when you visit the doctor or another health or social care professional, or for a carer's assessment, when applying for financial benefits and so on. SHARE EXPERIENCES WITH OTHER CARERS Talking to other people in a similar situation can help. You can connect with and chat to other carers on our Parkinson's UK forum and on our . Many carers are members of our local groups and attend meetings and activities, either with the person they care for or on their own. Our Parkinson's local advisers provide emotional support and practical help for people with Parkinson's, their carers and families. Carers UK has a forum for carers where you can chat to other carers, find support and share information. You can also read about other carers' experiences in our real life stories section. YOUR HEALTH NEEDS Letting your own health suffer or allowing stress levels to rise will not allow you to care well. Make sure you attend regular check-ups and screenings. As soon as you notice an issue, book an appointment so that any problems are managed as quickly and effectively as possible. Look after your back, especially if you have to lift the person you care for. Ask your GP, district nurse or an occupational therapist to advise on lifting, turning or moving aids to assist you. They can also offer advice on equipment and living aids to help the person you care for move around the house more easily without your help. A physiotherapist may be able to help you and the person you care for to maintain general levels of fitness and mobility. You may be referred to a physiotherapist by your GP, specialist or Parkinson's nurse. Recognise the signs of stress and find techniques to help with relaxation. Meditation, yoga or massage are just some ways to relax, but find what suits you best. Activities that absorb your concentration, such as gardening or reading, can be therapeutic. Learn to recognise the signs of depression. This may affect carers as well as people with Parkinson's. TALKING TO YOUR GP Your GP will be the first stop when accessing health and social services. Prepare for your appointments - keep a diary of how you (and the person you care for) have been, your feelings and any issues that have arisen. Make a list of things that you want to talk about. Keep the list short and put things in order of importance. If you have particular problems, think about how to describe them before you see the doctor. Try to be as factual as possible, and don't feel you have to talk in medical jargon. Just use the words that you feel comfortable with. If the person you care for is happy for you to be there, accompany them in their appointments with healthcare professionals. Also, invite them along if you are happy for them to attend your own appointments. Be honest about your needs, your feelings, and what you think would help. If you're not feeling confident, take someone along with you. Having someone else in the meeting can help you to remember what is said. Taking brief notes might help too. CARERS' REGISTERS Talk to the surgery's receptionist to get your caring responsibilities recognised by your GP. Some GP surgeries have a database of carers. If you are on this, you will be given special consideration because of your role and the pressures it may place on you. It will make all staff aware of your role, giving you more appropriate appointment times, pointers to other services and support. You will also be able to get free flu jabs and information about events for carers. It will ensure that any outpatient appointments and admission letters state that you are a carer. If your surgery doesn't have a carers' register, ask them to set one up, explaining how it will help staff to be aware of your and other carers' needs. PRIMARY HEALTH CARE TEAM Your GP and primary care team provide valuable support, advice and information. This may include: arranging home visits to you or the person you care for arranging appointments for you and the person you care for at the same time supplying repeat prescriptions to be delivered to your local pharmacy putting you in touch with other sources of support and advice, such as the social work department and local voluntary agencies providing supporting letters and information for benefits or for your local housing department or blue badge scheme CARERS' ASSESSMENTS Your local authority has responsibility for arranging services that help you take a break from caring. This is done through a carer's assessment. As a carer, it is your right to have an assessment. After your assessment, if your local authority agrees you have needs, they will arrange services to help you. As well as breaks, this may include any help that would maintain your own health and balance caring with other aspects of your life, such as work and family. To find out more, contact your local authority to ask for an assessment for the person you care for, and you as the carer. Your local authority will also have information on voluntary organisations and specialist providers of respite services (see below).  RESPITE AND TIME OFF FROM CARING A break from daily routines and responsibilities is important, especially if you care full-time because you are retired or don't work and are with the person you care for 24 hours a day. Breaks from caring are often called 'respite care'. This care can vary from a few hours' break to a longer holiday. You may want to go away alone, or there may be the chance to go with the person you care for on a holiday where care is provided. Time off from caring responsibilities can be vital. Respite care can help both you and the person with Parkinson's. It allows you both to have a break, and perhaps to socialise with other people. Respite can be given in a variety of ways, including: a social services care worker, or someone from a charity such as Carers Trust, coming to your home to care for the person with Parkinson's. This can be occasional or frequent the person you care for spending some time at a day centre, providing you with time to do your own thing the person you care for having short, perhaps regular, stays in a care home trips or holidays together with the person you care for You can find out more about respite care and how to apply for financial help or services from: NHS Choices Carers Trust Carers UK Crossroads Care NI Crossroads Caring Scotland Revitalise respite holidays for carers EXERCISE AND DIET A healthy diet and regular exercise are as important for you as a carer as they are for the person you care for. Exercise does not need to be too strenuous. Even a regular walk can help. It may help to talk to a physiotherapist. They can advise you on care of your own body, most importantly your back, as well as prevention of harm to the person for whom you are providing care. Some of our local groups hold group physiotherapy sessions and exercise classes for people with Parkinson's and their carers. ADJUSTING TO BEING A CARER "Sometimes you suddenly realise how things have changed. That people always ask 'How's Ron?' They never ask 'How are you?' or 'How are you coping?'" Last updated December 2013. We review all our information within 3 years. If you'd like to find out more about how we put our information together, including references and the sources of evidence we use, please contact us at publications@parkinsons.org.uk.
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Older people pick up objects in a different way to younger people

Designers take note: your products may be less useful for people as they get older.
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A warped view of social work in the media is unfair – and dangerous | Social Care Network | The Guardian

A warped view of social work in the media is unfair – and dangerous | Social Care Network | The Guardian | Social services news | Scoop.it
Too much coverage of our profession fuels the myth we are a sinister arm of the state, focused on the systematic removal of children...
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‘Good Death Week’: why we don’t talk about dying and why we need to

‘Good Death Week’: why we don’t talk about dying and why we need to | Social services news | Scoop.it
We are extremely pleased to welcome Callum Smith, Project Manager at the Health and Social Care Academy with an insightful guest post about 'Good Death Week' - opening up conversations around the e...
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BASW launches new practice guide for working with people suffering hearing loss | BASW News

BASW launches new practice guide for working with people suffering hearing loss | BASW News | Social services news | Scoop.it
The British Association of Social Workers is the independent and member-led professional association of social workers in the United Kingdom.
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Implications for Health and Social Care in Scotland with Brexit –

Implications for Health and Social Care in Scotland with Brexit – | Social services news | Scoop.it
"The governance that we have in Scotland, particularly around social care service delivery, is unique in the UK"...
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Content tagged with Showcasing Community Social Work

Content tagged with Showcasing Community Social Work | Social services news | Scoop.it
A series of case studies to demonstrate what community social work is and has to offer, grounded in real-life context and experience.
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State-of-the-art health centre in Aberdeen to welcome first patients

State-of-the-art health centre in Aberdeen to welcome first patients | Social services news | Scoop.it
More than 15,000 patients are expected to benefit from a £7.6 million health centre which will open its doors in Aberdeen today.
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1 in 4 young people have been contacted over social media by an adult they don’t know | BASW News

1 in 4 young people have been contacted over social media by an adult they don’t know | BASW News | Social services news | Scoop.it
The British Association of Social Workers is the independent and member-led professional association of social workers in the United Kingdom.
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Care Appointments | New childcare careers website aims to boost workforce numbers in Scotland

Care Appointments | New childcare careers website aims to boost workforce numbers in Scotland | Social services news | Scoop.it
A new website designed to encourage people to consider taking up a career in childcare in Scotland h...
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WEBINAR Integrated Care Matters Series 2:  A Community Approach to Palliative and End of Life Care

WEBINAR Integrated Care Matters Series 2:  A Community Approach to Palliative and End of Life Care | Social services news | Scoop.it
The International Foundation for Integrated Care is delighted to introduce the 2nd series of webinars on people-centred integrated care in practice. The series focuses on active and healthy ageing and preventing and managing frailty. The webinars are hosted by IFIC Scotland  in collaboration with the University of the West of Scotland, the Institute of Research and Innovation in Social Services, the Health and Social Care Alliance, Advantage JA  www.advantageja.eu .  Each monthly webinar features health and care practitioners from Scotland in conversation with colleagues from across the World and with insights from people who currently use health and social care support. All of our ‘Home and Away’ presenters have experience of implementing people-centred integrated care for older people and will offer practical tips and peer support as part of IFIC’s global community of practice. Each webinar is accompanied by a dynamic Topic Resource building on IFIC’s on-line knowledge tree, collating information resources related to the specific topic discussed. Contribute and Share your resources, reflections and experience to build the resource. Send resources to IFICScotland@integratedcarefoundation.org
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