Social Networks: The science behind them
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Social Networks: The science behind them
Examining the science behind social networks from network to social brain theory
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Facebook usage statistics 1st April 2011 vs April 2010 vs April 2009

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Facebook: bigger and bigger in LatAm

Facebook: bigger and bigger in LatAm | Social Networks: The science behind them | Scoop.it
For Facebook in Latin America, there’s plenty to “like”. The social networking site continues to see impressive growth across the region, dominating overall numbers and threatening to overtake Orkut in the all-important Brazilian market.
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What’s Old is New Again — The Startup Daily

The Google Guys, Richard L.Brandt, Business Book, Review, Startup, Entrepreneurs and Entrepreneurship...
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Eye-Tracking In Google Maps: Study Shows Value Of No. 1 Ranking & Social Content

Eye-Tracking In Google Maps: Study Shows Value Of No. 1 Ranking & Social Content | Social Networks: The science behind them | Scoop.it
A new eye-tracking and click-tracking study from Mediative (formerly known as Enquiro) shows the value of having the top spot in Google’s local results, but also suggests that social content and signals can boost rankings further down the page.
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Data Analytics and the Importance of Socializing Your Data

Data Analytics and the Importance of Socializing Your Data | Social Networks: The science behind them | Scoop.it
The fact is we live in a real-time world where data analytics and data overload are becoming more pervasive by the minute.
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Didn’t Get That New Job? You Need a Better Facebook Score

Didn’t Get That New Job? You Need a Better Facebook Score | Social Networks: The science behind them | Scoop.it
What if your Klout score -- that controversial measure of your...
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Separating You and Me? 4.74 Degrees

Separating You and Me? 4.74 Degrees | Social Networks: The science behind them | Scoop.it
Scientists at Facebook and the University of Milan reported on Monday that the average number of acquaintances separating any two people in the world is not six but 4.74.
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Forget 'six degrees'--we are actually closer

Forget 'six degrees'--we are actually closer | Social Networks: The science behind them | Scoop.it
Facebook study finds that the average number of people who separate any two individuals in the world is 4.74. Read this blog post by Steven Musil on Digital Media.
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Mining Online Data Across Social Networks

http://scpd.stanford.edu/ Capturing Data, Modeling Patterns, Predicting Behavior. Capturing Data, Modeling Patterns, Predicting Behavior - Based on collectin...
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Social Networks Matter: Friends Increase the Size of Your Brain | The Primate Diaries, Scientific American Blog Network

Social Networks Matter: Friends Increase the Size of Your Brain | The Primate Diaries, Scientific American Blog Network | Social Networks: The science behind them | Scoop.it
New research confirms that social complexity enriches cognitive growth. Could having more Facebook friends actually make you smarter?



Let's face it, as a species we're obsessed with ...
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Facebook usage statistics Dec 31st 2010 vs Dec 31st 2009 vs Dec 31st 2008

Over the last year Facebook has continued to grow significantly, with the fastest growing markets now being seen in Asia. There has also been strong growth in Mexico, Eastern Europe, Brazil and India - can Facebook keep growing like this through 2011? (Russia is one to watch too - currently at number 31 in the list and showing 2 year growth of +2519% with 3.2m Facebook users now.)

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Followers And Their Interactions Mean Different Things to Different Persons on Google Plus | Media Tapper

Followers And Their Interactions Mean Different Things to Different Persons on Google Plus | Media Tapper | Social Networks: The science behind them | Scoop.it
In several conversations on Google+ there has been talk about the validity and meaning of the Klout scores and what they should represent.
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Flu Tracking - Influenza Crowdsourcing - Crowdsourcing.org

Flu Tracking - Influenza Crowdsourcing - Crowdsourcing.org | Social Networks: The science behind them | Scoop.it
Thousands die each year from Influenza. You can help keep everyone healthier and better informed this flu season and maybe even help minimize the spread.
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Google+ Lets You See Your Contacts' +1s

Google+ Lets You See Your Contacts' +1s | Social Networks: The science behind them | Scoop.it
Articles that get a +1 from Gmail contacts or Google+ circle members will now show up in users’ Spotlight sections, a post to the official Google News blog explained.
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The Next Social Media Challenges

The Next Social Media Challenges | Social Networks: The science behind them | Scoop.it

Technologies scale, really well, but people do not – This axiom is why venture capitalists will value a tech company at 4-13X revenues while a people-based consultancy is lucky to be valued at 0.7X revenues. People just don’t scale. We need new generations of social media that do more than facilitate the conversation – we need products to help manage the deluge.

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Do you really know what you want in a partner?

Once you meet a potential dating partner, one's ideals are likely to fall by the wayside, according to new research.
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Why golfers get ahead

Why golfers get ahead | Social Networks: The science behind them | Scoop.it

Intriguingly, a recent study found that bosses who don’t play golf are paid 17% less on average than those who do. Could this be because the qualities that make a good golfer—a mixture of hyper-competitiveness with strategic thinking and coolness under fire—also make for a good chief executive?

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The Social Graph is Neither (Pinboard Blog)

The Social Graph is Neither (Pinboard Blog) | Social Networks: The science behind them | Scoop.it

The idea of representing relationships between people as networks is old, but this was the first time I had thought about treating the connections between all living people as one big object that you could manipulate with a computer.

 

At the time he wrote, Fitzpatrick had two points to make. The first was that it made no sense for every social website to try and recreate the same web of relationships, over and over, by making people send each other follow requests. The second was that this relationship data should not be proprietary, but a common resource that rival services could build on as a foundation.

 

Fitzpatrick subsequently went to work for Google, and his Utopian vision of open standards and open data became subsumed in a rivalry between Google and Facebook. Both companies now offer their version of a social graph API, and Google (which is trying to catch up) has taken up the banner of open standards and data portability.

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Royal Pingdom: Social network popularity around the world in 2011

Royal Pingdom: Social network popularity around the world in 2011 | Social Networks: The science behind them | Scoop.it
Online social networks are everywhere these days, a truly global phenomenon. But where are the different social networks having the most success in terms of popularity? That is what we’ll try to answer in this post.
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Paul Zak: Trust, morality - and oxytocin

http://www.ted.com Where does morality come from -- physically, in the brain? In this talk neuroeconomist Paul Zak shows why he believes oxytocin (he calls i...
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One Per Cent: Occupy vs Tea Party: what their Twitter networks reveal

One Per Cent: Occupy vs Tea Party: what their Twitter networks reveal | Social Networks: The science behind them | Scoop.it
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