Social Media, Youth and Health Literacy
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Young People and Social Media: Is There Anything for Parents to Worry About?

Young People and Social Media: Is There Anything for Parents to Worry About? | Social Media, Youth and Health Literacy | Scoop.it
Blog post at TechSling Weblog :
What is the most important thing after the internet that has been introduced in the field of information and technology?
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Project Literacy Among Youth: Health and Media Literacy Education

Project Literacy Among Youth: Health and Media Literacy Education | Social Media, Youth and Health Literacy | Scoop.it
PLAY is dedicated to media and technological literacy education in the USA. We provide a variety of educational services and resources to educators. Our unique approach is characterized by a 3-P framework of Philosophy, ...

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Research Findings - Health Literacy Studies - Harvard School of Public Health

Research Findings - Health Literacy Studies - Harvard School of Public Health | Social Media, Youth and Health Literacy | Scoop.it
Research Findings - Health Literacy Studies - Harvard School of Public Health (Health Literacy Research findings for those who want research to backup their actions....)...

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Can digital health technology improve health literacy? | mHIMSS

Can digital health technology improve health literacy? | mHIMSS | Social Media, Youth and Health Literacy | Scoop.it
Can digital health technology improve health literacy?

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Professional and Personal Health with Social Media

Professional and Personal Health with Social Media | Social Media, Youth and Health Literacy | Scoop.it

Social media domains offer a new strategy for many people battling weight-related issues and desiring to lose weight. As obesity rates continue to rise, it is imperative for people to choose methods for change that fit their lifestyle.

Support and accountability through social media

Many people feel that they are supported and accountable through social media sites, which can be extremely advantageous. Working with many successful clients and just as many unsuccessful clients has proven that a positive support system and an accountability program are two vital components of any successful weight loss endeavor. Social media certainly provides an outlet for these. Not too long ago, there were far fewer options for staying in touch and providing support to a person who needed more than weekly or twice weekly contact.

Goal setting

There are numerous benefits to taking your weight loss efforts to the social media platform. First, studies show that making your goals public helps you to continue to remain accountable to them; one common fear that people have is that they don’t understand what their end result will be. Another fear is that they will succeed (or worse, they will fail). Making these goals public is a great way for many people to maintain consistency and continue performing necessary actions when they may not feel like doing so, or when progress slows down. Knowing that others are watching may help to fuel successful habits.

An educational opportunity

In addition to simply taking your goals to social media, you have a great opportunity to connect with fitness, medical, and weight loss professionals via their professional pages on Facebook or following their tweets on Twitter. Many professionals enjoy engaging with people and answering questions, providing educational content, and suggesting options for meals, workouts, and mental training. Having 24/7 access to so much information can be overwhelming, but it also can be an incredible tool. This can afford many people the ability to create a “novice” plan and help them to navigate the confusing world of marketing and misinformation.

In my practice, I employ Twitter and Facebook as well as an educational blog series. My twitter feed allows me to connect with quick, “on the go” tidbits of information and provides thought-provoking questions. The Facebook platform is my most widely used platform. I have a business page that provides inspirational messages many times a day and educational content as well as programming and marketing information to inform customers about my company specialties, which ensures “fans” that they are receiving real and credible information to help them achieve their goals. Facebook also allows me to stay connected to clients through a private coaching page. On that page, I provide coaching and accountability questions for members and it helps to create a positive, supportive, and engaging environment for people to feel comfortable and remain connected. It allows people to get timely information without having to wait.

Connecting your apps and media

An added benefit of many social media sites is the ability to connect with other weight loss and health applications. Calorie counting and exercise sites can connect directly to your social media outlets, which can create a wider and more detailed network for you to garner even more support and information.

There are clients that use applications to track food, meditation, water intake, count steps, etc. Tremendous success stories come from people who are accountable to the tool (application) and make it public for guidance and support (social media).

We have seen people accomplish incredible goals and outcomes much more quickly than expected because they use more of the correct tools. Clients have achieved a 30 lb weight loss in 90 days using an app to help them drink more water, a website to schedule their workouts, and an application to track their food intake.

One client, who has lost more than 100 pounds through training with us and following our dietary advice along with tracking it in an app that can be checked, uses a pedometer (synced to our team page) to track steps and help to create challenges. That client also uses the social media sites to garner more support and engage in proper coaching.

Overall, social media can provide a comfortable outlet for people to connect and discuss common goals, get recipes and meal ideas from Pinterest, garner self-congratulations for workouts performed, and create a support network to maintain accountability to those goals.

Eliminating limiting factors

Additionally, social media eliminates the time and distance factors that many individuals face; it also eliminates many cost issues, enabling people to get basic guidance for low or no cost whatsoever. Many companies also offer discounts and incentives to people who are connected to their social media outlets, which enables the member to gain more complete, detailed information to reach weight loss goals.

Social media is, in no way, a replacement for complete programming administered by a qualified professional; however, in this day and age of social media, it certainly makes sense that it should and would be a part of your total support and education system.

Conclusion

In summary, there are numerous benefits to creating goals, making them public, and creating a positive support system to help you with accountability, guidance, and education.


Read more at http://www.business2community.com/social-media/professional-personal-health-social-media-0797024#iXPZOI3Xof1eISoE.99


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Tweeting, online reviews link patients to healthcare systems

Tweeting, online reviews link patients to healthcare systems | Social Media, Youth and Health Literacy | Scoop.it

Social networking among health care providers has, like most everything online, come a long way in the last few years.

For instance, doctors at Henry Ford Hospital in Dearborn, Mich., recently tweeted a live surgery, updating Twitter followers as a cancerous tumor was removed from a man’s kidney.

The hospital is not alone in using social media to engage and educate followers. Most hospitals and other medical providers have been using social networking to give followers a behind-the-scenes look at facilities, post updates on cutting-edge medical discoveries and procedures and more.

Sharp HealthCare in San Diego, for instance, has pages on Facebook — in both English and Spanish — as well as Pinterest and Instagram accounts that are used to give behind-the-scenes looks at what it’s like to work at or receive care at one of the system’s hospitals.

There’s also a Twitter feed to share information that ranges from healthy recipes to breaking news, such as information about a recent fire in one of the facility’s parking garages.

Sharp also has a LinkedIn account, a Google+ page and a YouTube channel.

“For us, it’s a way to offer that around-the-clock access to us,” said Jennifer Balanky, Sharp’s digital content supervisor. “Health care can be a very scary thing. We want (our patients) to know we’re there for them.”

One of the benefits of using social media is that it often furthers patient education.

According to a study published in Epilepsy & Behavior, one-third of respondents did not know anyone else with epilepsy with whom they could talk. Now, two-thirds of those people had at least one other person with whom they could consult on social networks to gain a better understanding of seizures and learn about symptoms or treatments.

Another study, published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research, found that 41 percent of HIV patients reduced their own risky behaviors thanks to online social support and education.

Many health care organizations are finding that having a social media presence is a way to reach an audience that’s looking for information or a place to share questions, concerns or complaints. It’s also where patients can — on many occasions — receive feedback from health care providers.

“Anything that builds on that (doctor-patient) relationship and lets the patient feel they have a say in their care … anything that can engage a patient is going to improve the whole process,” said Dr. Steven Steinhubl, director of digital medicine at Scripps Translational Science Institute in La Jolla. “We want to get helpful information out to our patients. The job of the physician as an educator is one of our most important roles.”

 


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Social Media Update 2013 - Pew Internet & American Life Project

Social Media Update 2013 - Pew Internet & American Life Project | Social Media, Youth and Health Literacy | Scoop.it
Some 73% of online adults now use a social networking site of some kind. 1 Facebook is the dominant social networking platform in the number of users, but a striking number of users are now diversifying onto other platforms.
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Medical Education & Social Media

Medical Education & Social Media | Social Media, Youth and Health Literacy | Scoop.it

Medical education could benefit from new forms of communication between health professionals made possible through social media - a collection of technologies that use the Internet to connect people.


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24 Outstanding Statistics on How Social Media has Impacted Health Care

24 Outstanding Statistics on How Social Media has Impacted Health Care | Social Media, Youth and Health Literacy | Scoop.it

Social media is one of the most talked about disruptions to marketing in decades, but how is it impactful for the health care industry? In a generation that is more likely to go online to answer general health questions then ask a doctor, what role does social media play in this process? Let’s dive into some meaningful statistics and figures to clearly illustrate how social media has impacted health care in the last few years. Healthcare 1. More than 40% of consumers say that information found via social media affects the way they deal with their health. (source: Mediabistro) Why this matters: Health care professionals have an obligation to create educational content to be shared across social media that will help accurately inform consumers about health related issues and out shine misleading information. The opinions of others on social media are often trusted but aren’t always accurate sources of insights, especially when it comes to a subject as sensitive as health. 2. 18 to 24 year olds are more than 2x as likely than 45 to 54 year olds to use social media for health-related discussions. (source: Mediabistro) Why this matters: 18 to 24 year olds are early adopters of social media and new forms of communication which makes it important for health care professionals to join in on these conversations where and when they are happening. Don’t move too slow or you risk losing the attention of this generation overtime. 3. 90% of respondents from 18 to 24 years of age said they would trust medical information shared by others on their social media networks. (source: Search Engine Watch) Why this matters: A millennial’s network on social media is a group of people that is well trusted online, which again, presents an opportunity to connect with them as health care professional in a new and authentic way.


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Sven Awege's curator insight, September 5, 2013 3:12 AM

Good read. Some interesting statistics that can bolster internal lobbying presentations for the Pharma Marketer.

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#hchlitss The Health Communication, Health Literacy and Social ...

#hchlitss The Health Communication, Health Literacy and Social ... | Social Media, Youth and Health Literacy | Scoop.it
The Health Communication, Health Literacy, & Social Science blog is a forum for anyone interested in the intersection of health, communication, and the social world...... Sunday, January 1, 2012. Joseph Kvedar, MD Director of the Center for ...

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Health Communications: Suicide in the Health Professions

Health Communications: Suicide in the Health Professions | Social Media, Youth and Health Literacy | Scoop.it
Kathleen believes in the power of health communication to extend health literacy and healthcare advocacy and is endeavoring to achieve this through blogging at Health Communications, #hchlitss and tweeting ...

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#hchlitss The Health Communication, Health Literacy and Social ...

#hchlitss The Health Communication, Health Literacy and Social ... | Social Media, Youth and Health Literacy | Scoop.it
The Health Communication, Health Literacy, & Social Science blog is a forum for anyone interested in the intersection of health, communication, and the social world...... Sunday, January 1, 2012. Joseph Kvedar, MD Director of the Center for ...

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BMC Public Health | Full text | The grounded psychometric development and initial validation of the Health Literacy Questionnaire (HLQ)

Health literacy has become an increasingly important concept in public health.


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Health Literacy - Clear Communication - National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Health Literacy - Clear Communication: An NIH Health Literacy Initiative - National Institutes of Health (NIH) (Poor health literacy is estimated to cost $106-236 billion annually (NIH) http://t.co/xwuDEgADGN)...


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Healthcare and Social Media - Stats

Healthcare and Social Media - Stats | Social Media, Youth and Health Literacy | Scoop.it
The IMS Institute recently published a paper describing the new ways in which social media usage is shaping healthcare. Both patients and physicians are increasingly turning to the internet—including social media—for healthcare information. Today, 70-75% of Americans with internet access have used the internet to find health information. 42% of survey respondents reported that they …

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Improve Patient Satisfaction through Social Media Engagement

Improve Patient Satisfaction through Social Media Engagement | Social Media, Youth and Health Literacy | Scoop.it

Engagement is an interesting word isn’t it? We talk about being engaged to be married, engaging in conversation or attending an affair all as engagement; and they all could represent a part of who you are as a medical practice, how your patients see you and the level of patient satisfaction they enjoy. How? Being engaged to be married could be that aspect of your devotion to your patient and your patient’s loyalty to you. Engaging in conversation is constantly happening between you and your patients and can get lost now with electronic medical records and technological advances.


Appointments are exactly how you do business every single day so your patients do have an engagement to attend at your practice. So, the question becomes “How are you going to assure patient engagement with your practice?” Unfortunately, the hard truth is that our patients have so many choices and so many more alluring opportunities to pull them away from you. In fact, some new changes in your practice such as technological advancements could actually drive a wedge between you and your patients if you are not observing and correcting. The important thing is to monitor, adjust and control the brand of your practice and the perception of you to your patients. That starts with knowing how important your patients are to you. In reality, you are in business and your patients are your market. The social media marketing gurus use techniques that you already have at your disposal but might not be using. One distinctive difference between you and a marketer is that doctors have the advantage of a constant feed of new content coming in every day through their engagement with their patients. Your waiting audience online has the opportunity to see fresh new insights every day from your practice because you have fresh new material openly coming to you without having to data mine. When you can grasp that concept and capitalize on the opportunity, it will be monumental to your growth. Time and resources are the biggest hurdles to social media marketing for medical or dental practices. Keeping it simple is the best way to maneuver through the social media process to engage with your patients for both growth and value to your patients.


Quick Techniques for Social Media Engagement with Your Patients 1. Patient Questions – You see patients in your office every day….it’s what you do, right? Each and every day you are presented with a new question and more than likely each and every patient has a question for you. Those questions (anonymously) turn into content on your social media blog or newsletter. More than likely if that patient is posing a question,your other patients are asking it too. Answer the question and you have relevant content that is fresh and educational for all of your patients and most importantly for those patients who may have just found you online, but want to hear what you have to say first.


2. Your Questions – Part of a conversation between two people involves asking questions. You ask your patients questions because you are trying to gather more information from them and they are used to this. The posting guidance suggested here would be to pose the question so that it is not specific to any given patient. You do not want to diagnose and/or treat a patient through social media in front of the world. An example of a question might be “Do you need to supplement with vitamins to be healthy?” You could elaborate on the statistics you are seeing in your practice (without being specific) and even propose a poll.


3. Solve a Problem – Talk quickly and without fluff, maybe in a few sentences about how to provide a solution to a problem. The more your patients and potential patients understand that you are likeable and knowledgeable in your craft, the quicker you become the expert that they turn to instead of running all over the internet looking for solutions. You build a network of those who trust your judgment.


4. Recommendations – There are so many options, remedies or product lines, it is best that your patients know and hear from about what you have tried or not tried as a physician and (be clear about endorsement if that is the case) to let them know your personal and/or professional opinion. However, be open minded as your patients will see your ability to be human as a physician and if you have not tried something don’t just rule it out. Use the rule of politics and religion to stay in the middle on controversial subjects unless there is clear harm to patients. There is growing visibility on the social networking landscape, and if you going to get a piece of the market share, you have to be engaged. It is important to not just talk, but listen to your market and provide value to them on a routine basis. You may not want to be the next Dr. Oz (or maybe you do), however you have vast control over your social footprint and what your patients see about you online. Before you know it, you will have a waiting audience of fans panting for your next set of juicy content to share with their friends and that is a lasting engagement. -


See more at: http://practicemanagersolutions.com/improve-patient-satisfaction-through-social-media-engagement/#sthash.JVjqY0O3.dpuf

 


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José Manuel Taboada's curator insight, March 16, 2014 7:07 AM

Medir la satisfacción de Paciente a través de Las RRSS

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Forum on social media in health explodes on Twitter

Forum on social media in health explodes on Twitter | Social Media, Youth and Health Literacy | Scoop.it

 

A public forum on how social media could be used to connect the general public with health professionals and health policy makers, held in Vancouver in February, generated more than 1.5 million impressions on Twitter and trended strongly in Canada that night.

The session was co-organized by the BC Patient Safety & Quality Council (BCPSQC) and the UBC Faculty of Medicine eHealth Strategy (eHSO) Office. In addition to excellent participation of an in-person audience and an online webcast, the hashtag #sm4health achieved 1.59 million impressions on Twitter.

This enthusiastic online participation via Twitter signified the popularity of this topic and the public’s strong interest in exploring how this medium can contribute to quality of health communication and dialogues.

The public forum opened with BC Minister of Health Terry Lake, and the Executive Associate Dean of the Faculty of Medicine, Dr. David Snadden.

eHSO Director Dr. Kendall Ho welcomed the audience and BCPSQC Executive Director Christina Krause (pictured) gave a keynote presentation to share her personal story of why she became involved in patient safety and quality in healthcare.

In particular, the BCPSQC (@BCPSQC) has used social media to gather best practices and suggestions through World Sepsis Day by engaging global participation via Twitter.

Next on the agenda, Dr. Keith White, physician co-lead for the Shared Care Polypharmacy initiative of the Doctors of BC/MoH, offered a specific case example of how polypharmacy – giving more medications to a patient than clinically required or appropriate – can cause more harm than good.

Dr. White emphasized the need to be vigilant about the judicious use and reduction of medications, and the important role of patients and families as partners with healthcare professionals. A video produced by the Fraser Health Authority was shared on this subject.

Audience members were invited to share their thoughts on this topic, and were asked how social media could be optimally used to improve healthcare and reduce the risks of polypharmacy.

Live Tweets were displayed on the screen with participants from in the room and around the world. Ideas captured included:

• “What about social media reminders to the public/family members to schedule a “Med Review” with primary care MD or Pharmacy?” @NurseNerdy

• “Social media channels would be a great way to disseminate PSA, awareness campaign, etc. on polypharmacy to various audiences #sm4health.” @HelenJoey

• “Twitter or google chat w pharmacists to let families ask questions about #polypharmacy (thought needed around privacy though).” @Gndv

Twitter afforded the ability to capture a large amount of relevant data to inform future practice via crowdsourcing. The use of social media as part of the proceedings extended the discussion from the live audience to virtually anywhere.

Healthcare and Twitter are an excellent match. New studies can be shared instantly (think of Twitter’s 140-character limit as the ultimate book preview), YouTube videos can help spread important messages, blogs and microblogs can give insights and engage others through sharing of reflections.

We hope to leverage these media to reduce the average of 17 years it takes to use medical knowledge generated from medical research for routine and safe use in clinical practice, and improve the community members’ understanding of and participation in health care improvement – one tweet at a time.

During the forum, live polling was used to capture people’s thoughts and uses of social media in their daily lives. Twenty-five per cent of the in-house crowd indicated they use social media daily in their professional work, with many more using social media in their personal and social lives. A challenge and a benefit of social media rests in its ability to blend one’s personal and professional identities, a challenge that can be even more pronounced in healthcare.

Perhaps it was said best in this tweet: “Personal experience makes many of us want to improve the patient experience.” @TerryLakeMLA

The entire evening was captured on webcast and can be viewed at http://bit.ly/1iaUOSa. eHSO has published a listing of social media groups (http://ehealth.med.ubc.ca/harnessingthesocialweb/) and recommended health apps (http://ehealth.med.ubc.ca/resources/resourcesmobileapps/) as resources to help community members get started on their exploration of social media for health. As well, the BCPSQC has a “Twitter for Health Care Professionals Guide” available here: http://bcpsqc.ca/documents/2012/11/Twitter-For-HealthCare-Professionals.pdf.

We welcome and want to hear your ideas and perspectives about Connecting for Quality: Social Media and Health Care. Please drop us a tweet!


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A New Dimension of Health Care: Review of the U...

A New Dimension of Health Care: Systematic Review of the Uses, Benefits, and Limitations of Social Media for Health Communication (A New Dimension of Health Care: Review of the Uses, Benefits, and Limitations of Social Media for Health via @JBBC


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Social Media: The New Reality in Health Care Communications - A Nurse's Perspective

The Ontario Hospital Association's social media video series has been developed to enhance your understanding of social media, and how best to leverage its g...
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Health Communication and Health Information Technology - Healthy People

Health Communication and Health Information Technology - Healthy People | Social Media, Youth and Health Literacy | Scoop.it
See how health communication and health IT can be used to improve health outcomes and health care quality.
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WHAT IS NEW MEDIA?

WHAT IS NEW MEDIA? | Social Media, Youth and Health Literacy | Scoop.it
Defining New Media Isn’t Easy
By Bailey Socha and Barbara Eber-Schmid
 
Introduction: What isn’t new media?

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Conference on health communication concludes - Times of India

Conference on health communication concludes - Times of India | Social Media, Youth and Health Literacy | Scoop.it
Conference on health communication concludes Times of India PUNE: India's first international communication management conference ( ICMC 2014), on 'managing health communication' concluded recently at Ahmedabad based Mudra Institute of...
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