Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks
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Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks
How to read & write in social web: sharing, blogging, tweeting, collaborating, curating
Curated by Heiko Idensen
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How the e-book landscape is becoming a walled garden

How the e-book landscape is becoming a walled garden | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it
Apple's decision to reject an e-book by Seth Godin because it contains hyperlinks to books in the Amazon store is just another example of how the oligopoly that controls the market for e-books is turning the landscape of reading into a walled garden.
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Just as a few massive chain stores eventually came to dominate the traditional printed book market in North America, the e-book marketplace is a kind of oligopoly involving a few major players — primarily Amazon, Apple and Barnes & Noble. And while bookstore owners of all kinds are free to decide which books they wish to put on their shelves, these new giants have far more control over whose e-books see the light of day because they also own the major e-reading platforms, and they are making decisions based not on what they think consumers want to read but on their own competitive interests. That is turning the e-book landscape into even more of a walled garden.

Author and digital-marketing maven Seth Godin highlighted this issue in a recent blog post, in which he described how his new book was turned down by Apple because it contained hyperlinks to books sold by Amazon (with whom Godin has a partnership). According to a letter that the author says he received from the company, the new title — Stop Stealing Dreams, a book about the transformation that Godin believes needs to happen in public education — was rejected by Apple due to what the letter described as “multiple links to [the] Amazon store.” Godin notes that the book had links to related works, including Too Big to Know from David Weinberger, co-author of The Cluetrain Manifesto.
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How To Engage Your Readers and Discover What They Really Need From You By Using Q&A Webinars

How To Engage Your Readers and Discover What They Really Need From You By Using Q&A Webinars | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

Robin Good: If you are looking for ways to "engage" your customers, readers and fans, webinars are truly a great solution.

 

Not only they allow you to showcase your expertise while providing good value to your audience, but they give you a tremendous opportunity to "listen" to your fans real needs and to address them later with custom-designed services and products.

 

Lewis Howes writes: "...My recommendation is to host publicly available Q&A webinars throughout the year, which allows you to “give back” to your market while also gaining valuable intelligence.


Pay close attention to recurring questions or themes in your webinars, since these are the signs your market may be ready for a new product.


They’re simple to do — just pick a topic and host an hour-long webinar where attendees can ask anything they’d like to learn more about or are struggling with.


Your job is to look for those repeating themes, because that’s what your market is hungry for.

 

...You can usually bet that the questions you get in your Q&A sessions are ones that lots of other customers have as well.

 

When you solve real customer problems, you put yourself at the head of the pack in your niche."

 

Truthful. 8/10

 

Full article: http://www.copyblogger.com/webinars-for-engagement/ 


Via Robin Good
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Mitchell Levy's curator insight, January 26, 2013 11:50 AM

If you're going to create a webinar, do it right and make sure that it's not just your megaphone, but your listening device.

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Subtext: make notes, highlight + share passages

Subtext: make notes, highlight + share passages | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

Like Amazon’s Kindle already does, Subtext gives anyone who reads an e-book the ability to make notes, highlight passages and to keep private or share those notes or highlights with other users. But this app goes much further: It also lets readers post questions, polls, quizzes or even Web links that are noted in the margins of the book. Other users respond to these posts and start mini book discussions that can continue indefinitely. Subtext content can be kept private, made visible to all users or made visible only to a user’s friends. Along with comments from fellow readers, Subtext users can see comments marked in blue that are made by a book’s author or other experts.

...
Unfortunately, Subtext smacks of immaturity when compared with other reading apps like Amazon’s Kindle app and Barnes & Noble’s Nook app. While those work on several devices and operating systems, Subtext works only on Apple’s iPad. It only runs with books from Google Books or those in Adobe’s ePub format, and the process for getting the latter—emailing the book to oneself or downloading the file from a website to the iPad—is clumsy and not intuitive. Co-founder Rachel Thomas said Subtext is actively developing for other platforms.
Another issue is that Subtext is only as good as its users’ involvement. The more people comment and create discussions, the more interesting it will be for others. For this to happen, the app has to lure readers away from the devices and apps they’re already comfortable with, like the Kindle or Nook, or the Kindle, Nook and Apple iBooks apps on the iPad.

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Are books and the internet about to merge?

Are books and the internet about to merge? | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it
Damien Walter: The difference between ebooks and the internet is minimal, and we should be glad the two are growing closer and closer...

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It's easy to forget that the world wide web as we know it today evolved from an early attempt to put books on the internet. When Tim Berners-Lee envisaged what would become the world wide web, it was with the idea of making academic papers and other documents widely available. To this end he devised a simple way of laying out text and images on a page, inventing what we now call Hypertext Markup Language or HTML.

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Early HTML could define pages and paragraphs, bold and italicise text, embed images and lay out tables. A little more than 20 years later, HTML 5 includes media playback and animation, and the web has now become so ubiquitous that for most users it is indistinguishable from the underlying framework of the internet itself, but at its core the technology of the web remains little changed. Every web page, however sophisticated it may seem, is basically a digital book that we read on our computer through our web browser.

...

So when Hugh McGuire, founder of PressBooks and LibriVox, stated today that the book and the internet will merge, he was in one sense simply reiterating what is already the case. But from the perspective of people without the technical knowledge to see how closely entwined the book and the internet already are, it has the whiff of yet another doom-monger proclaiming the death of the book as we know it.

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McGuire's argument hinges on the recent emergence of ebooks as a serious contender to the print book as the dominant artefact of the publishing industry, with some suggesting that ebooks will make up 50% of the book market by 2015 thanks to the Kindle, iPad and smartphones ...

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Starry Night (interactive animation)

A try to visualize the flow of the famous painting "Starry Night" of Vincent Van Gogh. The user can interact with the animation. Also, the sound responds to the flow. Made with openframeworks.

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zoom-App für iOS und Android passend zur Berlinale erschienen: Magazin der Filmemacher digital lesen - Apple iPad - PadMania

zoom-App für iOS und Android passend zur Berlinale erschienen: Magazin der Filmemacher digital lesen - Apple iPad - PadMania | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

In Berlin trifft sich zur Berlinale wieder das Who-is-Who der Filmbranche. Schauspieler, Filmemacher, Studios und Kreative feiern sich in der Hauptstadt selbst und stellen ihre neuen Filme vor. Da passt es perfekt, dass der Berliner Verlag Schiele & Schön “just in time” die App zoom vorlegt – für iOS und Android. Sie erlaubt es, ab sofort das bekannte “Magazin der Filmemacher” zoom auch digital zu lesen. Die App kostet nichts, die ersten beiden zoom-Ausgaben sind von Haus aus kostenfrei, weitere Hefte werden über einen In-App-Kauf gekauft. Aktion: Zur Berlinale verschenkt der Verlag das aktuelle Heft 2/12. Es kann über einen Gutscheincode bezogen werden.

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Readmill makes reading a book social: meet Henrik Berggren

He does what the Kindle should do...

....

I've often toyed with the idea of making something similar, but the big risk always feels like I'd be building a "feature" that Amazon or Apple should really be building for their own products. Then you'd feel like foursquare when FB did checkins (unless, of course, Apple or Amazon buy you!

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The social life of marginalia - Bobulate

The social life of marginalia - Bobulate | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it
The social life of marginalia Traveling between home and work on a single day, I count 44 notes I’ve scribbled down. These notes are in part private, in part public, and in all parts messy. They are...

(((.b.)))

Traveling between home and work on a single day, I count 44 notes I’ve scribbled down. These notes are in part private, in part public, and in all parts messy. They are everyday marginalia — notes in a printed book, saves in Instapaper, lists in Simplenote, likes in Tumblr, shares in Google Reader. They are spontaneous bursts of inspiration, reading data, that I’ve come upon and don’t want to lose track of, noted and collected across media and devices. Scattered marginalia of life, saved.

But marginalia has a more collected history. When John Locke began taking notes in 1652, he did so in such an elaborate way that a publisher named John Bell published a notebook called Bell’s Common-Place Book, Formed generally upon the Principles Recommended and Practised by Mr Locke. This notebook, eight pages of instructions on an indexing method, was for the first time a way of making it easier to navigate an otherwise messy semblance of 

(((.b.)))

Keeping “commonplace books” was the act of collecting bits of inspirational quotes and passages from disparate reading sources in one place, so cites Steven Johnson, and he refers to them as “a personalized encyclopedia of quotations.” Popular particularly in seventeenth and eighteenth century England, it was a way for readers of all kinds to track their paths.
(((.links.)))

Clive Thompson on the Future of Reading in a Digital World

http://www.wired.com/techbiz/people/magazine/17-06/st_thompson

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http://booktwo.org/

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http://www.robinsloan.com/

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http://www.themillions.com/2010/12/a-year-in-marginalia-sam-anderson.html

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Writing Kit: An iPad Writing App That Puts References At Your Fingertips

Writing Kit: An iPad Writing App That Puts References At Your Fingertips | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

One of the core features and frustrations of Apple's iPad experience is that you can only use one app at a time.

One of the core features and frustrations of Apple’s iPad experience is that you can only use one app at a time. Joanne McNeil once lauded the iPad’s lack of multi-tasking, saying that it was a focus machine.

http://tomorrowmuseum.com/?p=1516

 

(((.i.)))

"It’s putting a constraint on me … and my worst multi-tabbing, unfocused habits." iOS 4 has since introduced multi-tasking, but that’s in the form of allowing apps to stay resident in memory. You can still only look at one thing at a time. This can be a real benefit, but it gets problematic if you are working on a single task that requires more than one tool. Enter Writing Kit by developer Anh Quang Do.

http://getwritingkit.com/

 (((.i.)))

Most iPad writing apps like WriteRoom, iA Writer or Daedalus Touch focus on doing one thing well. Often their big selling point is that they are a "distraction-free writing environment," meaning the only thing you can really do on them is type text into a file. If you write like I do--which is to say: in a constant flow between checking notes, looking things up and typing--none of these work for completing drafts. 

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iPad Creative - iPad Creative Blog - The most natural eBook user interface yet seen?

iPad Creative - iPad Creative Blog - The most natural eBook user interface yet seen? | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

Some have said that Apple's designs, both hardware and software, are so complete that it's almost impossible for competitors to come up with anything new without infringing on their patents. This smart eBook interface prototype

http://www.kaist.edu/english/01_about/06_news_01.php?req_P=bv&req_BIDX=10&req_BNM=ed_news&pt=17&req_VI=3578

from KAIST

http://www.kaist.edu/english/

 

(Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology) shows that competing against Apple's innovation is certainly not impossible. Many of the ideas on show are some of the most innovatitve we've seen in a long while.

We hope to see this technology implemented on the iPad (and other eBook readers) in some shape or form shortly.

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Writing Kit: An iPad Writing App That Puts References At Your Fingertips | Co.Design

Writing Kit: An iPad Writing App That Puts References At Your Fingertips | Co.Design | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

Writing Kit’s approach is to make an app that combines a disparate set of capabilities into a single product. There’s a built-in browser and scratch pad for research and notes. It uses Markdown (with custom toolbars and a previewer to help editing). It integrates with Dropbox and TextExpander (Quang Do calls these "the 'standard requirements’ of new writing apps") along with a who’s who of services beloved by a certain kind of writer (Delicious, Pinboard, OmniFocus, Instapaper, to name a few).

"Writing Kit has all these tools, because I believe users already have their own workflow and wish to find an app that integrates their workflow into the writing task," Quang Do says. "It is so that you can 'unitask’: Focus on your writing, and nothing else."

(((.w.)))

iPad’s lack of multi-tasking, saying that it was a focus machine ...

http://tomorrowmuseum.com/?p=1516

**

Enter Writing Kit by developer Anh Quang Do:
http://getwritingkit.com/

 

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The Digital Humanities and the Transcending of Mortality

The Digital Humanities and the Transcending of Mortality | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

STANLEY FISH, January 9, 2012
http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/author/stanley-fish/ 

This is a blog. There, I’ve said it. I have been resisting saying it — I have always referred to this space as a “column” — not only because “blog” is an ugly word (as are clog, smog and slog), but because blogs are provisional, ephemeral, interactive, communal, available to challenge, interruption and interpolation, and not meant to last; whereas in a professional life now going into its 50th year I have been building arguments that are intended to be decisive, comprehensive, monumental, definitive and, most important, all mine.

(((.h.)))

In “Changing Places”

http://us.penguingroup.com/nf/Book/BookDisplay/0,,9780140170986,00.html?Changing_Places_David_Lodge

and “Small World,”

http://us.penguingroup.com/nf/Book/BookDisplay/0,,9780140244861,00.html?Small_World_David_Lodge

the novelist David Lodge fashions a comical/satirical portrait of a literary critic named Morris Zapp, whose ambition, as his last name suggests, is to write about a topic with such force and completeness that no other critic will be able to say a word about it. The job will have been done forever. That has always been my aim, and the content of that aim — a desire for pre-eminence, authority and disciplinary power — is what blogs and the digital humanities stand against.

(((.h.)))

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But this is just like “text in process”: if the individual is defined and constituted by relationships, the individual is not really an entity that can be said to have ownership of either its intentions or their effects; the individual is (as poststructuralist theory used to tell us) just a relay through which messages circulating in the network pass and are sent along. Mark Poster draws the moral: “[T]he shift … to the globally networked computer is a move that elicits a rearticulation of the author from the center of the text to its margins, from the source of meaning to an offering, a point in a sequence of a continuously transformed matrix of signification” (“What’s the Matter With the Internet?”, 2001).

http://www.upress.umn.edu/book-division/books/whatas-the-matter-with-the-internet

 

 

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Apple Set to Reinvent E-books with Simple New Publishing Tools | PadGadget

Apple Set to Reinvent E-books with Simple New Publishing Tools | PadGadget | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it
Most people in the tech and news communities believe that Apple’s event will be the first step towards a revolution of the current publishing system.

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According to Ars Technica, Apple is going to announce tools that will help textbook authors to create interactive e-books and to distribute them on the iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch.

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The first part of the announcement will concern Apple’s format of choice. The company currently uses ePub 2 with HTML-5 to enable audio and video, but a newly updated ePub 3 standard is all inclusive, allowing for native audio and video without extensions. It is likely that Apple will announce its support for the ePub 3 standard for iBooks, which may have the unfortunate consequence of making Apple’s e-books incompatible with other e-readers.
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Apple is also expected to announce new software tools for digital publishing, which currently is no simple task to format. Apple will make it much easier for authors to self-publish content using Apple’s tools.

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Schools and students have been adopting iPads with fervor, but thus far, an iPad is unable to replace a textbook in most situations. Easy to use tools and a new format that supports audio and video interactivity could potentially revolutionize the way that we learn. Textbooks won’t be limited to just words on paper. Imagine a textbook that can teach you a concept with both an explanation and a video, and then help you study for the test with pre-programmed flash cards, sample problems, and 3D models.

***

And of course, since our iPads are inherently connected to the world around us, students will be able to share notes, concepts, and thoughts with other students, promoting a learning anywhere type of environment.

***

The future is digital, and Apple is leading us there. Inefficient and limited paper textbooks will be a thing of the past when interactive learning takes over.

What does that have to do with the overall publishing industry? Well, Apple’s tools aren’t going to be limited to textbook users. If Apple does indeed release an easy-self-publishing tool, it could provide authors with a way to skirt traditional publishing, and challenge Amazon’s own self-publishing tools

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How to: publish your blog to Kindle | How to succeed in journalism | Journalism.co.uk

How to: publish your blog to Kindle | How to succeed in journalism | Journalism.co.uk | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it
This guide explains how you can submit an RSS feed of your blog to Amazon in less than 10 minutes for it to be available in the Kindle store a day or two later.
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#BeyondtheTextbook: The Internet is the Best Textbook

#BeyondtheTextbook: The Internet is the Best Textbook | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

On March 18, 2012, in Learning, Teaching, by ryanbretag

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Thoughts are beginning to flow at Discovery’s #BeyondtheTextbook think-tank, and I’m inclined to toss my own ideas out here. But the impetus for this post stems from the Apple’s announcement that has too many people, many for whom I respect, blindly looking to take a bite out of this new textbook, to put these items back at the center.

Our focus, however, should be clear. The Internet is the best textbook. Start there! Then, support/empower the experts in your school to create and curate learning objects in an ongoing, collaborative experience with peers and learners.

Seriously. I can’t understand why we would begin elsewhere.

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Diana Laufenberg, a person I greatly admire, said it best in her recent post:

“I heavily buy into the idea that using a variety of resources, borrowing from current events when it makes connection, and exploring themes rather than just a timeline, allows for a student to interact with the information in a more organic, realistic manner; much the way they will need to interact for the rest of their days outside the classroom.

Don’t we want students to interact as the learners they are and will be? Don’t we want them to challenge deeply the variety of resources both curated for and by them?

***

When the traditional textbook produced by a publisher is at the center, I firmly believe that content and teaching are at the center instead of learners and learning. This places the type of learning experiences our students and teachers deserve at risk.


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The Feldman File: eBooks: Reality sets in for publishers

The Feldman File: eBooks: Reality sets in for publishers | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

Publishers are beginning to understand that things aren't going to go back to the way they were before the Great Recession, and that eBooks are much more than simply another way to consume books. They may not represent as shocking a transition as the effect of television on the movie industry during the 1950s and 60s, but eBooks' impact on the book industry will be dramatic, especially given that we're still early in the transition from print to digital. What will things look like on the other side of the transition? That's the subject of a future post.

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eReading - How is reading changing?

eReading - How is reading changing? | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

Conclusion: I have been slow to embrace electronic books and still prefer the printed book much of the time, but recent advancements in screens and software have made me reconsider. I now find value in both kinds of books. At times, for certain purposes, I find eBooks superior. I also see how they might improve student comprehension because of the dialogue that may take place between book and reader.

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Reading on a smart phone, a laptop or an iPad type device - What's up?

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It seems we have reached a tipping point in publishing and reading.

For certain tasks eBooks offer dramatic advantages over printed books. As suggested by Alan Reid in his FNO article, "Knowtation: Reading and Thinking Between the Lines and Around the Edges," eBooks support reading behaviors that are akin to but superior to the marginalia possible with printed books ...

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How McLuhan, Agel, and Fiore Created a New Visual Vernacular for the Information Age

How McLuhan, Agel, and Fiore Created a New Visual Vernacular for the Information Age | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

One faithful day in 1965, the most monumental and legendary typo in media history took place: someone switched a letter in the title of what soon became an era-defining book by legendary media theorist Marshall McLuhan*, best known for coining the catchphrase “the medium is the message.” Thus The Medium is the Massage: An Inventory of Effects was born, thanks to a unintentional error most McLuhan biographers sweep under the carpet. But, the legend goes, once McLuhan saw the typo, he exclaimed, “Leave it alone! It’s great and right on target!” The title of the book was suddenly open to four possible interpretations — a play on “Message” and “Mess Age,” or “Massage and “Mass Age.” The book soon came to be referred to simply as Massage. But what is most curious — and least known — about it is that it was developed explicitly for young readers, relying on graphic materials to engage younger audiences with big-idea nonfiction. (Sound familiar?)

(.b.)

The Electric Information Age Book: McLuhan / Agel / Fiore and the Experimental Paperback tells the fascinating story of these collaborations and how they created a new media form “designed to put into popular form, or into more understandable form, some of the greatest ideas of our time.”

...

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Podcast: Douglas Coupland & William Gibson

Podcast: Douglas Coupland & William Gibson | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

In this hour-long conversation, recorded on the opening night of the 2012 seminar, Coupland leads Gibson through a discussion on culture, technology, and the craft of writing. 'What makes us human,' Gibson says, 'is our ability to recognize patterns, and to externalize forms of synthetic memory that preserve those recognized patterns.' The internet and its attendant communications technologies, Gibson argues, are a natural evolution of this synthetic memory, the current iteration of the cave painting human ancestors used to record their activities. These technologies function as a 'global instantaneous memory prosthesis' and aspire to a transparency of experience whereby distinctions between the 'virtual' and the 'real' are thoroughly dissolved. 'We are already the borg,' Gibson says.

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Readmill's Henrik Berggren Is Making Your Social Graph An E-Bookstore | Fast Company

Readmill's Henrik Berggren Is Making Your Social Graph An E-Bookstore | Fast Company | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it
One major drawback to e-books is that there is no easy way to share text among friends. And there's little incentive for Amazon or Apple to solve this problem. That makes it a great opportunity for a startup like the Berlin-based Readmill, which lets you highlight a passage, add a note, share it with friends online, and see which books are popular in your social graph.

(((.e.)))

In this episode of Innovation Agents, Readmill cofounder Henrik Berggren talks about what it takes to become an entrepreneur, and offers some advice for how to prepare yourself to take on the challenge. "I do everything," he says. "From day-to-day it changes totally, and that's what I really love about working at a startup." After the video, head over to the Readmill website to sign up for the private beta.

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Elitzr 17: Henrik Berggren of Readmill

Elitzr 17: Henrik Berggren of Readmill | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

In this podcast Michael Wolf talks with Readmill CEO Henrik Berggren about the world of social reading.
***

Our newest podcast is a conversation with Henrik Berggren, the cofounder and CEO of Readmill. Readmill is a social reading startup creating a platform for sharing, annotation and in-book conversation. My chat with Henrik took place just days before their launch to the broader public of their platform.

A few takeaways from the conversation:

In-book social today is a world of different islands, where sharing and socializing around the content is largely restrained to the various platforms. The idea of taking it cross-platform (from Kindle, to Nook, to iBooks) is something that Readmill has in its sites and they have an API strategy to make this happen.
Social reading is still something that requires too much work on the part of the consumer today. Most consumers are going to read in the existing associated software framework that is on the e-reader, and making them move outside of that is a big hurdle. Readmill recognizes this and is working on ultimately trying to integrate with the big players.
I mentioned during our conversation, and I think it’s true in a sense: the social annotation layers for e-books, particularly if from interesting viewpoints (be it the author himself, a critic, or a smart reader) are going to be the “DVD extras” of the e-book in coming years. While not everyone will use them, those that want to dive in deep and hear the backstory, hear different viewpoints, will love social annotation.
We talk about a lot of things in the podcast, including the future of social reading, the future of Readmill (including how they plan to monetize), as well as get a little backstory on the company’s early days.
So enjoy the conversation and let us know what you think! 


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THE EXPRESSIVENESS OF SILENCE AND SPACE IN STORYTELLING, MUSIC AND ART

THE EXPRESSIVENESS OF SILENCE AND SPACE IN STORYTELLING, MUSIC AND ART | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

[Narrative space is one of my favorite topics.]

 

Great artists have the ability to create with less, allowing us our own empty space to develop our own story: Francisco Goya, in his Tauromaquia series used blank canvas, and shadings of grey and white to create the feeling of space. In this sketch Goya uses empty space to dramatize the fury of a singular moment of horror during a bullfight.

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Inspire Any Student Writer With StoryBird

Inspire Any Student Writer With StoryBird | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

StoryBird is a web tool that allows students to use artists’ artwork to create a story book.  I have used this tool in the classroom to help reluctant 4th and 5th grade writers find motivation for creative writing. There are many applications for use, for example: creative writing, using art with spelling words to create a story, illustrating content areas in creative ways… the possibilities are endless!


Via Jim Lerman
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A first look at Apple’s new iBooks Author

A first look at Apple’s new iBooks Author | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

Today, at Apple's Education Event in NYC, the company announced iBooks Author, a new Mac application that enables authors to easily publish interactive ebooks into the iBookstore.
(((.I.)))
iBooks Author is easy and powerful, but we’ll have to wait and see what kind of users it attracts before we know what it’s truly capable of. Philip Schiller, Apple’s Senior Vice President of Worldwide Marketing, explained in the presentation that there are already “20k education applications built specifically for the iPad,” and that ”it’s not a big surprise that students get excited to learn on the iPad — it was #1 on teen’s wish lists this holiday.”

http://thenextweb.com/apple/2012/01/19/apple-1-5-million-ipads-in-use-in-educational-programs-offering-over-20000-education-apps/

 

With “over 1.5m iPads in use in education,” it’s hard to argue the impact iBooks 2 will have, especially now with the new iBooks Author. The app may prove to be a major step forward for independent publishers and authors looking to join 

http://thenextweb.com/apple/2012/01/19/apple-1-5-million-ipads-in-use-in-educational-programs-offering-over-20000-education-apps/ 

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Authorship and iAuthorship | Powerful Learning Practice: Let the remixing begin… ;0)

Authorship and iAuthorship | Powerful Learning Practice: Let the remixing begin… ;0) | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

Apple’s mega announcement of their new iTunes U courses and, more interesting to me, their new iBooks Author app has many of us thinking anew about the state of textbooks and informal learning and openness and a whole bunch of other things. It’s been interesting to watch the “debates” on Twitter (and elsewhere)

http://thornburgthoughts.wordpress.com/2012/01/19/why-does-apple-want-to-kill-education/

 

between those in the “Oooo shiny” camp and those in the “Apple doesn’t get it” camp. I think I’m falling more toward the latter as it seems to me at least that this is more about repackaging the same old stale content into the same old interactive content provided by the same old content providers with little of the spirit of sharing that I find most powerful about the Web built in. Far be it from me to suggest Apple doesn’t have the right to float this model, but I’ve yet to see how this really advances education in meaningful ways without having something with an Apple logo on it in your backback or pocket to make it work. That’s a bug, not a feature.

(((.&.)))
But as I said, the interesting part of this announcement is the iBooks Author app which, in theory at least, moves us more toward construction than consumption. I know, I know…pretty much anything we construct with it becomes a part of Apple’s domain, and that part of it contradicts, I think, the best part of writing and sharing on the Web. Again, I may not have poked around in it long enough to know, but it doesn’t look like “authoring” via the app is collaborative, social, linkable…all the good stuff that at the end of the day fuels the learning that I, at least, do here online.

(((.&.)))
iBooks Author made me think immediately of a snip in an op-ed piece by Stanley Fish

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/01/09/the-digital-humanities-and-the-transcending-of-mortality/?hp

in the New York Times last week, a piece that anyone interested in the changing nature of authorship would do well to read. In it, he cites extensively a new-ish book by Kathleen Fitzpatrick titled Planned Obsolescence: Publishing, Technology and the Future of the Academy.

http://www.amazon.com/Planned-Obsolescence-Publishing-Technology-Academy/dp/0814727883/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1327174503&sr=8-1

These two paragraphs get to the salient ideas around the new tension to authorship on the Web:

(((.&.)))

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More about “text in process,” more about “collaboration,” more about “remix,” more about “sharing.” Forget for a moment the question of whether we are helping our students author in these contexts. (Hint: we’re not.) Are we seeing ourselves as authors in these ways? As I write this, do I see it as a “text in process?” Do I expect collaboration and remix? Do I understand the value of sharing and how to share it most effectively?

(((.&.)))

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Given that shifted definition of “authorship,” I think I’ll take that over the Apple version. Not to say that iAuthoring won’t have some positive impact on the learning interaction as more new ideas are shared, but that doesn’t feel much different from the way we’ve been doing things in school for the past 125 years.
Let the remixing begin… ;0)

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