Social Foraging
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Social Foraging
Dynamics of Social Interaction
Curated by Ashish Umre
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Spontaneous Symmetry Breaking in Interdependent Networked Game

Spontaneous Symmetry Breaking in Interdependent Networked Game | Social Foraging | Scoop.it
Spatial evolution game has traditionally assumed that players interact with direct neighbors on a single network, which is isolated and not influenced by other systems. However, this is not fully consistent with recent research identification that interactions between networks play a crucial rule for the outcome of evolutionary games taking place on them. In this work, we introduce the simple game model into the interdependent networks composed of two networks. By means of imitation dynamics, we display that when the interdependent factor α is smaller than a threshold value αC, the symmetry of cooperation can be guaranteed. Interestingly, as interdependent factor exceeds αC, spontaneous symmetry breaking of fraction of cooperators presents itself between different networks. With respect to the breakage of symmetry, it is induced by asynchronous expansion between heterogeneous strategy couples of both networks, which further enriches the content of spatial reciprocity. Moreover, our results can be well predicted by the strategy-couple pair approximation method.
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Customer Loyalty Optimization: Bayesian Networks

Customer Loyalty Optimization: Bayesian Networks | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

This tutorial illustrates an innovative market research workflow for deriving marketing and product planning priorities from auto buyer surveys. In this study, we utilize the Strategic Vision New Vehicle Experience Survey, which includes, among many other items, customers’ satisfaction ratings with regard to over 100 individual product attributes.

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Bill Aukett's curator insight, February 17, 2014 10:44 PM

How can linear equations, no matter how complicated, demonstrate complexity?

 

the website has some interesting white papers such as http://bayesia.us/assets/bayesian_networks_intro_v17.pdf

 

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Quantifying Information Flow During Emergencies

Recent advances on human dynamics have focused on the normal patterns of human activities, with the quantitative understanding of human behavior under extreme events remaining a crucial missing chapter. This has a wide array of potential applications, ranging from emergency response and detection to traffic control and management. Previous studies have shown that human communications are both temporally and spatially localized following the onset of emergencies, indicating that social propagation is a primary means to propagate situational awareness. We study real anomalous events using country-wide mobile phone data, finding that information flow during emergencies is dominated by repeated communications. We further demonstrate that the observed communication patterns cannot be explained by inherent reciprocity in social networks, and are universal across different demographics.

 

Quantifying Information Flow During Emergencies
Liang Gao, Chaoming Song, Ziyou Gao, Albert-László Barabási, James P. Bagrow & Dashun Wang

Scientific Reports 4, Article number: 3997 http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep03997


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António F Fonseca's curator insight, February 7, 2014 8:53 AM

Extensive study of information bursts in emergency situations, comparative analysis against other high arousal events like a rock concert is very instructive.

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Puppies! Now that I’ve got your attention, complexity theory

Animal behavior isn't complicated, but it is complex. Nicolas Perony studies how individual animals -- be they Scottish Terriers, bats or meerkats -- follow simple rules that, collectively, create larger patterns of behavior. And how this complexity born of simplicity can help them adapt to new circumstances, as they arise.

 

http://www.ted.com/talks/nicolas_perony_puppies_now_that_i_ve_got_your_attention_complexity_theory.html


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António F Fonseca's curator insight, February 4, 2014 9:40 AM

The guy seems to be confessing some obscure personal sin but the talk is very interesting.

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In the Playing Ground of Consciousness

Dehaene has little patience with philosophy. No eristic and endless debates about whether consciousness can or cannot be explained within a reductionist framework. The book introduces the methods that acted as midwife at the birth of a science of consciousness: treating people's reports about their subjective experiences as genuine scientific data (with appropriate caveats); manipulating the visibility of briefly flashed images of faces, objects, words, or numbers so that the subject sometimes consciously sees them but sometimes not (depending on experimental conditions or uncontrolled processes in the subject's brain); and recording the associated neural activity using functional brain imaging, electroencephalography (EEG), magnetoencephalography, or electrodes implanted into the brain of epileptic patients to monitor seizures for clinical purposes.

 

In the Playing Ground of Consciousness

Christof Koch

Science 31 January 2014:
Vol. 343 no. 6170 p. 487
http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1248710

 

Consciousness and the Brain Deciphering How the Brain Codes Our Thoughts by Stanislas Dehaene Viking, New York, 2014. 350 pp. $27.95, C$32.95. ISBN 9780670025435.

http://tinyurl.com/klpczln


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Roboticists Discover the Secret of Insect Flight, and it's Not Wings

Roboticists Discover the Secret of Insect Flight, and it's Not Wings | Social Foraging | Scoop.it
When it comes to insect flight, we usually only think about how the insect's wings contribute to aerial stability. But scientists have now discovered that the abdominal movements of some insects also play a large role in flight control, particularly when hovering — a finding that could lead to improved aerial drones.

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Visualizing Google Analytics Data With Fusion Tables

Visualizing Google Analytics Data With Fusion Tables | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

Have you ever secretly wished to do crazy visualizations with your Google Analytics data? I am sure you have! Well, there are several ways to do that, the most powerful being the Google Analytics API in conjunction with powerful visualization tools.

 

However, sometimes visualization tools may require technical knowledge or are just too expensive. That's why I thought about using Google Fusion Tables to provide a few complementary visualizations to Google Analytics - it is a great tool, very user friendly, and free.

 

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Big Data and Business Decision Making: What’s the point of all that data, anyway? It’s to make decisions.

Big Data and Business Decision Making:  What’s the point of all that data, anyway? It’s to make decisions. | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

Back in 1956, an engineer and a mathematician, William Fair and Earl Isaac, pooled $800 to start a company. Their idea: a score to handicap whether a borrower would repay a loan.

 

It was all done with pen and paper. Income, gender, and occupation produced numbers that amounted to a prediction about a person’s behavior. By the 1980s the three-digit scores were calculated on computers and instead took account of a person’s actual credit history. Today, Fair Isaac Corp., or FICO, generates about 10 billion credit scores annually, calculating 50 times a year for many Americans.

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Evolution, You’re Drunk

Evolution, You’re Drunk | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

Amoebas are puny, stupid blobs, so scientists were surprised to learn that they contain 200 times more DNA than Einstein did. Because amoebas are made of just one cell, researchers assumed they would be simpler than humans genetically. Plus, amoebas date back farther in time than humans, and simplicity is considered an attribute of primitive beings. It just didn’t make sense.

The idea of directionality in nature, a gradient from simple to complex, began with the Greeks, who called nature physis, meaning growth. That idea subtly extended from changes over an organism’s lifetime, to changes over evolutionary time after Charles Darwin argued that all animals descend from a single common ancestor. When his contemporaries drew evolutionary trees of life, they assumed increasing complexity. Worms originated early in animal evolution.  Creatures with more complex structures originated later. Biologists tweaked evolutionary trees over the following century, but generally, simple organisms continued to precede the complex.

 

http://nautil.us/issue/9/time/evolution-youre-drunk


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Social Physics: How Good Ideas Spread—The Lessons from a New Science: Alex Pentland

Social Physics: How Good Ideas Spread—The Lessons from a New Science

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For good or ill, big data and networks have taken over our lives and, unfortunately, they too often run amok. From the Arab Spring, mediated on Twitter and Facebook, to the NSA spying scandal, to the 2008 financial crash, big data and networks are causing wrenching changes but very rarely can we piece together why, how, or what do to about the problem.  Alex “Sandy” Pentland and his team have created a new data science that not only describes how networks of people behave but also creates actionable intelligence from that understanding.  Called “Social Physics,” it encapsulates social, analytical, computer, and managerial sciences into a synthesis that allows us to build more resilient and creative societies while at the same time providing greater protection for personal privacy and resistance to cyber attack.  Pentland’s new book, SOCIAL PHYSICS: How Good Ideas Spread—The Lessons from a New Science, is a landmark tour of this new science, offering revolutionary insights into the mysteries of collective intelligence and social influence.


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Liz Rykert's curator insight, February 10, 2014 7:24 PM

Adding this one to my reading list.

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Wildly Detailed Drawings That Combine Math and Butterflies

Wildly Detailed Drawings That Combine Math and Butterflies | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

Rafael Araujo’s illustrations are bafflingly complex—so complex that you might assume the artist uses a computer to render the exacting angles and three-dimensional illusions. And true, if you were to recreate his intricate mathematical illustrations using software, it probably wouldn’t take you long at all. But the craziest part of all is that Araujo doesn’t use modern technology to create his intricately drawn Calculations series—unless, of course, you count a ruler and protractor.

 

The Venezuelan artist crafts his illustrations using same skills you and I learned in our 10th grade geometry class. Only instead of stashing those homework assignments deep into the locker of his brain, Araujo uses these concepts to create his da Vinci-esque drawings. In Araujo’s work, butterflies take flight amidst a web of lines and helixes, a shell is born from a conical spiral, and the mathematical complexity of nature begins to make sense.

 

He says perspective and angles have always come naturally to him. “When I was young I began drawing perspective almost out of the blue,” he recalls. “I loved three-dimensional drawings and liked to find out ways to locate dots in the space.” Before computer-assisted drawing, there were artists like M.C. Escher, who Araujo counts among his biggest influences. “When I first saw M.C. Escher, I was speechless,” he says. “His artwork was so akin to my geometrical taste.”

 

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SensoMotoric Instruments: Gaze and Eye Tracking Systems

SensoMotoric Instruments: Gaze and Eye Tracking Systems | Social Foraging | Scoop.it
SensoMotoric Instruments (SMI) is a world leader in hardware and software solutions for gaze and eye tracking, eye movement and eye control in psychology, neurology, usability, market research, sports, training, medicine.

 

From January 22-25, 2014, the World Leaders will gather in Davos, CH, as they have been doing each year for more than three decades. SensoMotoric Instruments (SMI; www.smivision.com) will be there to present eye tracking as a key technology which drives industry transformation – especially when used in combination with brain response data. Decision making, the related information processing and human-machine-interaction are being transformed by better understanding and real time usage of visual attention, emotions and brain information processing.

 

In a unique on-site eye tracking experiment with world leaders conducted in Davos, SMI will demonstrate how eye tracking reveals the underlying factors of information retrieval. How these insights can be used to improve decision making, inform policy-making and strategy will be explained by Olivier Oullier, professor of Behavioral and Brain Sciences at Aix-Marseille University (France) and also a Young Global Leader of the World Economic Forum. He will lead the experiment all week long and, on January 23rd, he will present results from an innovative worldwide lab and on site study he conducted for the World Economic Forum and his partners. Key insights on sustainable consumption were investigated and compared across countries thanks to the unique mobility afforded by the combination of SMI Eye Tracking Glasses 2.0 (ETG) in combination with Emotiv's EPOC brain response technology.

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Somewhere is a new visual platform for showing off your work and skills

Somewhere is a new visual platform for showing off your work and skills | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

With LinkedIn now a staple of the recruitment world, having a profile is pretty much essential for job-hunters and people wanting to showcase their skills.

 

However, Berlin-based startup Somewhere thinks that the new world of work deserves a new way of showcasing your talents. As such, it has just opened up its image-oriented work skills platform to the public, although you’ll still need to request an invite for now.

 

A main profile page looks a little like a Pinterest board, with little square boxes of information (called ‘Sparks’) arranged on the page containing information about skills, work history etc. On the main profile page, all the Sparks are shown together – but there are also links for jumping directly to specific information about a person, with categories like: ‘What I do’, ‘How I work’, ‘What I’ve done’, ‘Interest and inspiration’, ‘Aspirations’, ‘People who matter’ and more.

 

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Visual Crowding: Uncovering foveal crowding?

Visual Crowding: Uncovering foveal crowding? | Social Foraging | Scoop.it
Visual crowding, as context modulation, reduce the ability to recognize objects in clutter, sets a fundamental limit on visual perception and object recognition. It's considered that crowding does not exist in the fovea and extensive efforts explored crowding in the periphery revealed various models that consider several aspects of spatial processing. Studies showed that spatial and temporal crowding are correlated, suggesting a tradeoff between spatial and temporal processing of crowding. We hypothesized that limiting stimulus availability should decrease object recognition in clutter. Here we show, for the first time, that robust contour interactions exist in the fovea for much larger target-flanker spacing than reported previously: participants overcome crowded conditions for long presentations times but exhibit contour interaction effects for short presentation times. Thus, by enabling enough processing time in the fovea, contour interactions can be overcome, enabling object recognition. Our results suggest that contemporary models of context modulation should include both time and spatial processing.
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Should We Use Devices to Make Us Smarter?

Should We Use Devices to Make Us Smarter? | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

It's hard to imagine anyone, no matter how brilliant, who doesn't yearn to be even smarter. Thanks to recent advances in neural science, that wish may come true. Researchers are finding ways to rev up the human brain like never before. There would be just one question: Do we really want to inhabit that world?

 

It may be too late to ask. Modern society has already embraced the basic idea of fine-tuning our intellects via artificial procedures—what might be termed “cosmetic” neurology. Schoolchildren take Adderall, Concerta and other attention-focusing medications. Parents and teachers rely on antidepressants and antianxiety drugs. And self-help books offer the latest advances in neuroscience to help ordinary people think faster and sharper.

 

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From Schelling to Schools

We address theoretically whether and under what conditions Schelling's celebrated result of 'self-organized' unintended residential segregation may also apply to school segregation. We propose here a computational model of school segregation that is aligned with a corresponding Schelling-type model of residential segregation. To adapt the model for application to school segregation, we move beyond previous work by combining two preference arguments in modeling parents' school choice, preferences for the ethnic composition of a school and preferences for minimizing the travelling distance to the school. In a set of computational experiments we assessed the effects of population composition and distance preferences in the school model. We found that a preference for nearby schools can suppress the trend towards self-organized segregation obtained in a baseline condition where parents were indifferent towards distance. We then investigated the joint effects of the variation of agents' 'tolerance' for out-group members and distance preference. We found that integrated distributions were preserved under a much broader range of conditions than in the absence of a preference for nearby schools. We conclude that parents' preferences for nearby schools may be an important factor in tempering for school choice the segregation dynamics known from models of residential segregation.

 

From Schelling to Schools: A Comparison of a Model of Residential Segregation with a Model of School Segregation

Victor Ionut Stoica and Andreas Flache

Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation 17 (1) 5

http://jasss.soc.surrey.ac.uk/17/1/5.html ;


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Eli Levine's curator insight, February 11, 2014 1:37 PM

It appears as if racial segregation begins with where you live and are able to live.  This then helps to perpetuate misunderstandings, bigotry and biases against people from other racial, ethnic and social backgrounds than yourself in many individual cases across the human spectrum.

 

It's a shame that, even now, we're still so tribal, just like our chimp ancestors.

 

Think about it.

Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, March 28, 2017 4:43 PM
Diversity leads to curiousity.
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The Brain Ages Optimally to Model Its Environment: Evidence from Sensory Learning over the Adult Lifespan

While studies of aging are widely framed in terms of their demarcation of degenerative processes, the brain provides a unique opportunity to uncover the adaptive effects of getting older. Though intuitively reasonable, that life-experience and wisdom should reside somewhere in human cortex, these features have eluded neuroscientific explanation. The present study utilizes a “Bayesian Brain” framework to motivate an analysis of cortical circuit processing. From a Bayesian perspective, the brain represents a model of its environment and offers predictions about the world, while responding, through changing synaptic strengths to novel interactions and experiences. We hypothesized that these predictive and updating processes are modified as we age, representing an optimization of neuronal architecture. Using novel sensory stimuli we demonstrate that synaptic connections of older brains resist trial by trial learning to provide a robust model of their sensory environment. These older brains are capable of processing a wider range of sensory inputs – representing experienced generalists. We thus explain how, contrary to a singularly degenerative point-of-view, aging neurobiological effects may be understood, in sanguine terms, as adaptive and useful.

 

Moran RJ, Symmonds M, Dolan RJ, Friston KJ (2014) The Brain Ages Optimally to Model Its Environment: Evidence from Sensory Learning over the Adult Lifespan. PLoS Comput Biol 10(1): e1003422. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1003422


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Smart Cities | Lipari School on Computational Complex Systems

Smart Cities | Lipari School on Computational Complex Systems | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

The Jacob T. Schwartz International School for Scientific Research in 2010 opened a new set of summer schools on Computational Complex Systems The 2014 edition addresses Ph.D. students, junior and senior researchers to the forefront of research activity on data mining and computational models for the analysis, modeling and understanding smart cities. Recognized authorities in the field will give formal lectures tailoring these for an interdisciplinary audience. Participants will also have the opportunity to present the results of their research during a short communication session. As a whole, the planned summer school will allow participants to be exposed to cutting edge results in one of the most challenging research area, while at the same time enjoying the relaxing atmosphere of one of the most beautiful italian islands.

 

Smart Cities
July 27 - August 2, 2014, Lipari Island

http://lipari.cs.unict.it/LipariSchool/ComplexSystems/index.php


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Discovery of quantum vibrations in 'microtubules' inside brain neurons supports controversial theory of consciousness

Discovery of quantum vibrations in 'microtubules' inside brain neurons supports controversial theory of consciousness | Social Foraging | Scoop.it
A review and update of a controversial 20-year-old theory of consciousness claims that consciousness derives from deeper level, finer scale activities inside brain neurons. The recent discovery of quantum vibrations in "microtubules" inside brain neurons corroborates this theory, according to review authors. They suggest that EEG rhythms (brain waves) also derive from deeper level microtubule vibrations, and that from a practical standpoint, treating brain microtubule vibrations could benefit a host of mental, neurological, and cognitive conditions.

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Colbert Sesanker's curator insight, January 26, 2015 6:55 PM

This far into the theory there  clearly seems to be something to it. What is this something?  In the critical review by Reimers, the claim that strong Frohlich condensation coherence times are too short to be relevant has been falsified by Bandyopadhyay's experimental results here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VQngptkPYE8&list=PLrrIFqNTWk8M-vhD8Gn6ssFlhiEZZ6qGH&index=9

The whole idea of finding a medium for consciousness is a bit strange (and highly doubtfull given any flavor of idealism is vastly simpler and more explanatory) the possibility of cytoskeletal structures serving as a kind of 'mount' makes some sense though. 

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Ethereum: Next-generation distributed cryptographic ledger

Ethereum: Next-generation distributed cryptographic ledger | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

Ethereum is a next-generation distributed cryptographic ledger that is designed to allow users to encode advanced transaction types, smart contracts and decentralized applications into the blockchain. Ethereum will support custom currencies or "colored coins", financial derivatives, and much more, but unlike many previous networks that attempted to accomplish the same thing Ethereum does not attempt to constrain users into using specific "features"; instead, the ledger includes a built-in Turing-complete programming language that can be used to construct any kind of contract that can be mathematically defined.

 

When the grand experiment that is bitcoin began, the anonymous wizard desired to test two parameters- a trustless, decentralized database enjoying security enforced by the austere relentlessness of cryptography and a robust transaction system capable of sending value across the world without intermediaries. Yet the past five years years have painfully demonstrated a third missing feature: a sufficiently powerful Turing-complete scripting language.

 

Up until this point, most innovation in advanced applications such as domain and identity registration, user-issued currencies, smart property, smart contracts, and decentralized exchange has been highly fragmented, and implementing any of these technologies has required creating an entire meta-protocol layer or even a specialized blockchain. Theoretically, however, each and every one of these innovations and more can potentially be made hundreds of times easier to implement, and easier to scale, if only there was a stronger foundational layer with a powerful scripting language for all of these protocols to build upon. And this need is what we seek to satisfy.

 

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Population genomics of the honey bee reveals strong signatures of positive selection on worker traits

Population genomics of the honey bee reveals strong signatures of positive selection on worker traits | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

Most theories used to explain the evolution of eusociality rest upon two key assumptions: mutations affecting the phenotype of sterile workers evolve by positive selection if the resulting traits benefit fertile kin, and that worker traits provide the primary mechanism allowing social insects to adapt to their environment. Despite the common view that positive selection drives phenotypic evolution of workers, we know very little about the prevalence of positive selection acting on the genomes of eusocial insects. We mapped the footprints of positive selection in Apis mellifera through analysis of 40 individual genomes, allowing us to identify thousands of genes and regulatory sequences with signatures of adaptive evolution over multiple timescales. We found Apoidea- and Apis-specific genes to be enriched for signatures of positive selection, indicating that novel genes play a disproportionately large role in adaptive evolution of eusocial insects. Worker-biased proteins have higher signatures of adaptive evolution relative to queen-biased proteins, supporting the view that worker traits are key to adaptation. We also found genes regulating worker division of labor to be enriched for signs of positive selection. Finally, genes associated with worker behavior based on analysis of brain gene expression were highly enriched for adaptive protein and cis-regulatory evolution. Our study highlights the significant contribution of worker phenotypes to adaptive evolution in social insects, and provides a wealth of knowledge on the loci that influence fitness in honey bees.

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From Animals to Animats: Simulation of Adaptive Behavior 2014

FROM ANIMALS TO ANIMATS 13

The 13th International Conference on the SIMULATION OF ADAPTIVE BEHAVIOR (SAB2014)
22-26 July 2014, Castellon, Spain

http://www.sab2014.org/

 

The objective of this interdisciplinary conference is to bring together researchers in computer science, artificial intelligence, alife, control, robotics, neurosciences, ethology, evolutionary biology, and related fields so as to further our understanding of the behaviors and underlying mechanisms that allow natural and artificial animals to adapt and survive in uncertain environments. The conference will focus on experiments with well-defined models --- robot models, computer simulation models, mathematical models --- designed to help characterize and compare various organizational principles or architectures underlying adaptive behavior in real animals and in synthetic agents, the animats.


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Xenobiology: A New Scientific Model Defines Alien Intelligence

Xenobiology: A New Scientific Model Defines Alien Intelligence | Social Foraging | Scoop.it
Should we ever detect an extraterrestrial civilization, or any kind of alien life for that matter, it's a safe bet they'll look very different from us. They'll also probably think in a way that's completely foreign to what we're used to. Here's how experts believe we might be able to predict what the minds of aliens will be like.

 

Intelligence has historically been studied by comparing nonhuman cognitive and language abilities with human abilities. Primate-like species, which show human-like anatomy and share evolutionary lineage, have been the most studied. However, when comparing animals of non-primate origins our abilities to profile the potential for intelligence remains inadequate.

 

Historically our measures for nonhuman intelligence have included a variety of tools: (1) physical measurements – brain to body ratio, brain structure/convolution/neural density, presence of artifacts and physical tools, (2) observational and sensory measurements – sensory signals, complexity of signals, cross-modal abilities, social complexity, (3) data mining – information theory, signal/noise, pattern recognition, (4) experimentation – memory, cognition, language comprehension/use, theory of mind, (5) direct interfaces – one way and two way interfaces with primates, dolphins, birds and (6) accidental interactions – human/animal symbiosis, cross-species enculturation. Because humans tend to focus on “human-like” attributes and measures and scientists are often unwilling to consider other “types” of intelligence that may not be human equated, our abilities to profile “types” of intelligence that differ on a variety of scales is weak. Just as biologists stretch their definitions of life to look at extremophiles in unusual conditions, so must we stretch our descriptions of types of minds and begin profiling, rather than equating, other life forms we may encounter.

 

COMPLEX (COmplexity of Markers for Profiling Life in EXobiology) offers a new approach to profile a variety of organisms along multiple dimensions including EQ – Encephalization Quotient, CS – Communication Signal complexity, IC – Individual Complexity, SC – Social Complexity and II – Interspecies Interaction. Because Earth species are found along a variety of continuums, defining an intelligence profile along these different trajectories rather than comparing them only to human intelligence, may give us insight into a potential tool for quickly assessing unknown species. The application of profiling nonhuman species, out of world, will be both observational and potentially interactive in some way. Using profiles and indicators gleaned from Earth species to help us develop profiles and using pattern recognition, modeling and other data mining techniques could help jump start our understanding of other organisms and their potential for certain “types” of intelligence.

  
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Data Mining Reveals The Surprising Behaviour Of Dating Website Users

Data Mining Reveals The Surprising Behaviour Of Dating Website Users | Social Foraging | Scoop.it
When it comes to finding the perfect mate, people aren’t as fussy as they make out, say researchers studying behaviour on online dating sites.

 

People in the US and around 40 million of them have signed up with various online dating websites such as match.com and eHarmony. As a result, about 20% of current romantic relationships turn out to have started online. 

 

So it’s no surprise that there is intense interest in understanding the behaviour of those who sign up and in improving systems designed to create a successful match.

 

Today, Peng Xia at the University of Massachusetts Lowell and a few pals publish the results of their analysis of the behaviour of 200,000 people on an online dating site. Their conclusions are fascinating.

They say most people behave more or less exactly as social and evolutionary psychology predicts: males tend to look for younger females while females put more emphasis on the socioeconomic status of potential partners. 

 

But they also have a surprise. They say that when it comes to choosing partners, both men and women’s actual behaviour differs significantly from their stated tastes and preferences which they outline when they first sign up. In other words, people are not as fussy about partners as they make out.

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Theresa Donnelly's curator insight, December 15, 2015 4:24 PM

I found this article to be very interesting in both the facts that it displays as well as the direction that it takes.

 

Of the 54 million single people in the world, about 40 million of them are currently, or have in the past, signed up for a dating website. It is on these sites that people go in with wildly different intentions, preferences, and shared information in order to have a connection with another in any way, shape or form.

 

This study found that the said users or said sites behave according to evolutionary predictions that males prefer younger girls and women prefer the opposite in males, but on the other swing of things, they also found that people matched with others even though they differed from their stated preferences.

 

This is so telling in that the internet may give you the outward option of filtering through preferences where real life does not, it does not always make it the better or more accurate option for all. 

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You can use Chrome to build something out of LEGO

You can use Chrome to build something out of LEGO | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

Google today announced a new Chrome experiment in partnership with LEGO: Build with Chrome. In short, you can use your mouse or touchscreen to build something out of the colorful bricks directly in your Web browser, share them on Google+, and explore what others have already built.

 

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