eHealth - Social Business in Health
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eHealth - Social Business in Health
ehealth, integrating care, health monitoring, on line communication, interaction and (mobile) technology to care for health better
Curated by rob halkes
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50% Of Consumers Expect IoT & Wearables To Provide Full HealthIT Monitoring

50% Of Consumers Expect IoT & Wearables To Provide Full HealthIT Monitoring | eHealth - Social Business in Health | Scoop.it
Consumers want technology to monitor every aspect of their life and Wearable Tech, IoT and all emerging technologies are working together towards such goal. The question remains: Will this help or hurt providers’ efforts?
rob halkes's insight:

Technology itself creates expectations. Handling these and making them true is a challenge. Lots of healthcare providers are relucatant to their impact. eHealth thinking and realization can go in manageable steps creating your proper roadmap. See here

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Dutch eHealth-monitor 2014 - Nictiz.nl - Nivel.nl

Dutch eHealth-monitor 2014 - Nictiz.nl - Nivel.nl | eHealth - Social Business in Health | Scoop.it

The Dutch ehealth monitor of the Netherlands has been released recently. There is no English translation yet, nor a summary, but a English infographic is presented at this post on the website. Here you can see that ehealth is steadily but I guess, firmly growing in NL.


More healthcare users say their GP allows them to make online appointments: from 7% in 2013 to 13% in 2014; or request repeart prescriptions: from 21% to 30%.

More GP's, 93% to 98% (!) and medical specialists, 66% to 75% use mainly or exclusively electronic records!


However no major shifts are found in the use of eHealth compared to 2013.

There will be greater coordination in the area of eHealth. The Ministry of Health Welfare and Sport sets concrete objectives, and parties 'in the field' seek each other out for joint activities!


Four things stood out in the study:

  1. eHealth in the workplace is still not always 'plug and play'
  2. Process innovation is difficult
  3. Healthcare users and healthcare providers do not always see sufficient added value
  4. Healthcare users are often unaware of possibilities already available

For a real, large scale use of eHealth a good balance is needed between the investment in money and effort and the experience added value in terms of imprived care, convenience and financial benefits.


See here for Nictiz  and here for Nivel the sources and down;oads of inforgroaphic (in English too) and the report (Dutch).

rob halkes's insight:

I would say that experience demonstrates that ehealth initiatives may be initiated by small efforts to digital services from physicians to patients, like repeat prescriptions. These are relatively easy first steps.
However, when it comes to more complicated developments in digital health involving interaction, exchange of data and information, and communication between professionals and patients, that is a more heavy change to conquer. It needs more motivation, organization and perseverance on the site of the professionals besides the readiness of technology. More support to implementation seems to be necessary.

I reckoned that on the basis of my own experience from early on.

See some information to this here.

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Telemonitoring reduces readmissions 44 percent in 4-year, 500-patient study | mobihealthnews #hcsmeu

Telemonitoring reduces readmissions 44 percent in 4-year, 500-patient study | mobihealthnews #hcsmeu | eHealth - Social Business in Health | Scoop.it

Via IHEALTHLABS EUROPE
rob halkes's insight:
Research on eHealth now presents data that it really can safe costs. Not "just like that" of course, but one needs to accommodate to get to these results. See for instance here, to things to be thought through: http://www.healthbusinessconsult.com/telemedicine-ehealth-mobile-health/
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Michael Seres's curator insight, November 22, 2014 8:16 AM

Will that percentage increase with the growth of #wearables

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Definition of Health 2.0 and Medicine 2.0: A Systematic Review

Definition of Health 2.0 and Medicine 2.0: A Systematic Review | eHealth - Social Business in Health | Scoop.it
Definition of Health 2.0 and Medicine 2.0: A Systematic Review
ABSTRACT

Background: During the last decade, the Internet has become increasingly popular and is now an important part of our daily life. When new “Web 2.0” technologies are used in health care, the terms “Health 2.0" or "Medicine 2.0” may be used.
Objective: The objective was to identify unique definitions of Health 2.0/Medicine 2.0 and recurrent topics within the definitions.
Methods: A systematic literature review of electronic databases (PubMed, Scopus, CINAHL) and gray literature on the Internet using the search engines Google, Bing, and Yahoo was performed to find unique definitions of Health 2.0/Medicine 2.0. We assessed all literature, extracted unique definitions, and selected recurrent topics by using the constant comparison method.
Results: We found a total of 1937 articles, 533 in scientific databases and 1404 in the gray literature. We selected 46 unique definitions for further analysis and identified 7 main topics.
Conclusions: Health 2.0/Medicine 2.0 are still developing areas. Many articles concerning this subject were found, primarily on the Internet. However, there is still no general consensus regarding the definition of Health 2.0/Medicine 2.0. We hope that this study will contribute to building the concept of Health 2.0/Medicine 2.0 and facilitate discussion and further research.

(J Med Internet Res 2010;12(2):e18)

During the last decade, the Internet has become increasingly popular and now forms an important part of our daily life [1]. In the Netherlands, the Internet is even more popular than traditional media like television, radio, and newspapers [2]. Furthermore, the impact of the Internet and other technological developments on health care is expected to increase [3,4]. Patients are using search engines like Google and Bing to find health related information. In Google, five percent of all searches are health related [5]. Patients can express their feelings on weblogs and online forums [3], and patients and professionals can use the Internet to improve communication and the sharing of information on websites such as Curetogether [6] and the Dutch website, Artsennet [7] for medical professionals. The use of Internet or Web technology in health care is called eHealth [1,8].

In 2004 the term “Web 2.0” was introduced. O’Reilly defined Web 2.0 as “a set of economic, social, and technology trends that collectively form the basis for the next generation of the Internet, a more mature, distinctive medium characterized by user participation, openness, and network effects” [9]. Although there are different definitions, most have several aspects in common. Hansen defined Web 2.0 as “a term which refers to improved communication and collaboration between people via social networking” [10]. According to both definitions, the main difference between Web 1.0 (the first generation of the Internet) and Web 2.0 is interaction [11]. Web 1.0 was mostly unidirectional, whereas Web 2.0 allows the user to add information or content to the Web, thus creating interaction. This is why the amount of “user-generated content” has increased enormously [12]. Practical examples of user-generated content are online communities where users can participate and share content. Examples are YouTube, Flickr, Facebook, and microblogging such as Twitter. Twitter, for example, improves communication and the sharing of information among health care professionals [13]....

rob halkes's insight:

Review!

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