eHealth - Social Business in Health
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eHealth - Social Business in Health
ehealth, integrating care, health monitoring, on line communication, interaction and (mobile) technology to care for health better
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How does Precision Medicine look at the end of 2016? - The Journal of Precision Medicine

How does Precision Medicine look at the end of 2016? - The Journal of Precision Medicine | eHealth - Social Business in Health | Scoop.it

In an opinion piece published online in Medical Economics, part of the Modern Medicine Network, Henry Anhalt, DO discusses the current status of Precision Medicine as 2016 draws to a close. Reflecting on President Obama’s 2015 State of the Union address, in which he launched the Precision Medicine initiative – a program that aims to revolutionize health outcomes by taking a personalized approach to medicine and research – he acknowledges the ongoing debate as to whether this approach to treating disease can truly deliver on its promises. He also recognizes the uncertainty for precision medicine that lies ahead as the US enters a new presidential term.
One of the solutions Anhalt proposes is for clinicians to ask themselves how they can implement the tenets of precision medicine when treating patients in the immediate present. His suggested answers to this question included enabling patients to access their own health record data: “So they can review it when they need to and share it with others when they want”. He then discussed The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs’ push for patient access to health records through its pioneering “Blue Button” initiative and how it is a step in the right direction towards this goal.
Another suggestion involves how the community engages study participants in research, as: “There are many ways patients today can participate in research without requiring a visit to a large research hospital.” Anhalt continues, “For example, if patients can download their health records, one easy opportunity they may have is to donate them to research. For people with Type 1 diabetes, we offer a patient platform that allows that patient to connect with others who have Type 1 diabetes and participate in online research. To truly achieve the promise of precision medicine, it’s going to require that our patients have the understanding and motivation to become citizen scientists.”
He concluded with advice for clinicians that even if today they cannot practice precision medicine in full, they should at least strive for individualized care. “As physicians, we are trained to ask questions such as, ‘What are your symptoms; how long have you had these symptoms?’ and so forth. But what are the questions we’re not asking that help us get a more holistic view of a patient’s health?” He argues that greater empathy in clinical interactions could help achieved more personalized care in the present.
Finally, Anhalt points out that, despite the wealth of precision medicine research is being done, there is a long way to go until it can be fully and successfully integrated into healthcare systems nationwide. “We’ve just scratched the surface with the Precision Medicine Initiative, and it will be interesting to see what takes place in 2017 and beyond as we focus more on patient outcomes.”

rob halkes's insight:

Well established and short opinion on Precision medicine. Good to see the new journal too! Let's hope that this Obama initiative survives Trump's presidency! Why don't you share this to state your point?

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Precision Medicine Initiative - National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Precision Medicine Initiative - National Institutes of Health (NIH) | eHealth - Social Business in Health | Scoop.it
About the Precision Medicine Initiative

Far too many diseases do not have a proven means of prevention or effective treatments. We must gain better insights into the biology of these diseases to make a difference for the millions of Americans who suffer from them. Precision medicine is an emerging approach for disease treatment and prevention that takes into account individual variability in genes, environment, and lifestyle for each person. While significant advances in precision medicine have been made for select cancers, the practice is not currently in use for most diseases. Many efforts are underway to help make precision medicine the norm rather than the exception. To accelerate the pace, President Obama unveiled the Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI) — a bold new enterprise to revolutionize medicine and generate the scientific evidence needed to move the concept of precision medicine into every day clinical practice.

Read about the scientific justification of the Precision Medicine Initiative in a New England Journal of Medicine Perspective by NIH Director Dr. Francis S. Collins and former NCI director Dr. Harold Varmus.

rob halkes's insight:

Who could be against it? "Precision Medicine": The next logical step to eHealth: integrate personal data and biophysical parameters and adapt the treatment to a person.. Something we always intended too, didn't we?

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