eHealth - Social Business in Health
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eHealth - Social Business in Health
ehealth, integrating care, health monitoring, on line communication, interaction and (mobile) technology to care for health better
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Mobile Applications for Diabetes Self-Management: Status and Potential

Mobile Applications for Diabetes Self-Management: Status and Potential | eHealth - Social Business in Health | Scoop.it

Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, Vol. 7, Issue 1 Jan. 2013.

El-Gayar, Timsina and Nawar.


ABSTRACT

Background:
Advancements in smartphone technology coupled with the proliferation of data connectivity has resulted in increased interest and unprecedented growth in mobile applications for diabetes self-management. The objective of this article is to determine, in a systematic review, whether diabetes applications have been helping patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes self-manage their condition and to identify issues necessary for large-scale adoption of such interventions.
Methods:
The review covers commercial applications available on the Apple App Store (as a representative of commercially available applications) and articles published in relevant databases covering a period fromJanuary 1995 to August 2012. The review included all applications supporting any diabetes self-management task where the patient is the primary actor.
Results:
Available applications support self-management tasks such as physical exercise, insulin dosage or medication, blood glucose testing, and diet. Other support tasks considered include decision support, notification/alert, tagging of input data, and integration with social media. The review points to the potential for mobile applications to have a positive impact on diabetes self-management. Analysis indicates that application usage is associated with improved attitudes favorable to diabetes self-management. Limitations of the applications include lack of personalized feedback; usability issues, particularly the ease of data entry; and integration with patients and electronic health records.
Conclusions:
Research into the adoption and use of user-centered and sociotechnical design principles is needed to improve usability, perceived usefulness, and, ultimately, adoption of the technology. Proliferation and efficacy of interventions involving mobile applications will benefit from a holistic approach that takes into account patients’ expectations and providers’ needs.


J Diabetes Sci Technol 2013;7(1):247–262    

rob halkes's insight:

There is good perspective to mobile health (ehealth) applications to self management in diabetes. However, as this research review suggests: we need to know more about use and socio technological influences. As I repeat myself: ehealth mhealth is NOT about technology: it is about implementation. Let's go for that!

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Researchers at Intermountain Medical Center develop new smartphone technology and app to diagnose and monitor adrenal gland diseases

Researchers at Intermountain Medical Center develop new smartphone technology and app to diagnose and monitor adrenal gland diseases | eHealth - Social Business in Health | Scoop.it
Diseases of the adrenal gland have long been difficult to diagnose. But now, researchers have found an affordable and easy way to diagnose and monitor endocrine diseases of the adrenal gland by using saliva and a smartphone.

Researchers at Intermountain Medical Center in Murray, Utah, have developed new smartphone technology to help screen patients for a number of adrenal gland diseases, including Cushing's syndrome. The new tool also helps to identify adrenal insufficiency, monitor cortisol replacement and assess physiologic changes in adrenal function.

Adrenal diseases are commonly overlooked because measuring cortisol, the so-called "stress hormone" that is released by the adrenal glands as part of the fight-or-flight mechanism, is costly and complicated, especially for those with limited resources, say researchers.

"When cortisol levels are overlooked too many people suffer and die because of excess or insufficient cortisol," said Joel Ehrenkranz, MD, director of diabetes and endocrinology at Intermountain Medical Center, and lead researcher of the project.

To help solve this problem, researchers developed a simple saliva test that uses a smartphone and an attached device that inexpensively feeds the results of a saliva test into the smart phone. An app then quantifies and interprets the results of a salivary cortisol assay and gives results in five minutes at the point of care.

"The cortisol assay is similar in design to a home pregnancy test and urine sample drug tests," says Dr. Ehrenkranz. "It's like having an endocrine specialist in your phone."

[...]

The new technology will especially help diabetic patients.

For diabetics, controlling stress levels is key to controlling cortisol levels, which helps prevent and control the disease. Stress increases the levels of cortisol in their body, and elevations in cortisol impair the body's ability to metabolize glucose. This increases blood glucose levels. High cortisol levels also affect the body's ability to fight infections, lose weight and recovery from injury.

"What this means is when blood cortisol levels are too high, insulin will not lower blood sugar," said Dr. Ehrenkranz. "Elevations in cortisol decrease the effectiveness of insulin and other drugs used in the treatment of diabetes. Having the ability to easily and inexpensively measure cortisol levels is important in managing diabetes."


See also http://mobihealthnews.com/34753/intermountain-researchers-develop-smartphone-based-lab-test-for-stress/

rob halkes's insight:

Great example of Intermountain Health development of Mobile Med Tech - a first step into further development of ehealth eco systems for diabetes and other chronic diseases needing "..to identify adrenal insufficiency, monitor cortisol replacement and assess physiologic changes in adrenal function"

This development however will take some next steps into adopting the right processes and actions to create functional interaction with patients. I would say: go on! ;-)

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