eHealth - Social Business in Health
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eHealth - Social Business in Health
ehealth, integrating care, health monitoring, on line communication, interaction and (mobile) technology to care for health better
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Health 2.0 London _ Inspiring in relation with PatientView: new acknowledgements about patients preferences for health apps!

From Rob Halkes, manager Patient View in the Netherlands, and advisor to Health20.


This uear's edition of Health20, London, November 10-12, will especially be of large interests to both Health App developers, Healthcare providers and patients. Alexandra Wyke from PAtient View will present the outcomes of the first global research for Patients' wishes and demands regarding their health apps.

Here is a first view to the outcomes,

But at the conference more will be presented!

rob halkes's insight:

I am very thrilled to view the scoop presentation by  dr. Alexandra Wyke on the first day of Health20 in London2014, November 10th: "Choosing and Prescribing an App!" - based on the first global research of patients' wishes and demands about their Health Apps.


Do you wan to come, make your reservation with this 15% reduction code: SPCL15 ! You're welcome!

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Co-Creation in Health Care

Co-Creation in Health Care | eHealth - Social Business in Health | Scoop.it

Experience co-creation in health care is an effective method to innovate value to patients in a personalized way, in collaboration with all relevant stakeholders.
It is intended to benefit patients in coping with their health conditions and to arrive at a satisfying state of quality of life, given their specific personal health conditions.


Working together is conditional to health care. But "Co-Creation" and "Experience Co-Creation" are not like “working together” in a traditional way. The concept of the method of co-creation is rather based on acknowledging the difficulties in health care to work together. “Experience co-creation in care” enables personalization of health care tailored to the patient conditions and preferences. It drives the effectiveness of the total process: efficacy of medical interventions, therapy, rehabilitation and lifestyle.

rob halkes's insight:

I just wanted to create a quick overview of what Co-creation in Care looks like.

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The ePatient and His/Her Physician: What's the Way Forward?

The ePatient and His/Her Physician: What's the Way Forward? | eHealth - Social Business in Health | Scoop.it
On February 18th we gathered a panel from across three continents to discuss e-patient and physician relations in our latest Doctors 2.0 & You Google hangout.

Moderated by ePatient and health blogger, Marie Ennis-O’Connor, the panel which included Denise Silber (founder of Doctors 2.0), Jamie Tripp Utitus (MS survivor and health blogger) and Renza Sciblia (diabetes consumer and health blogger) discussed the ways in which new technologies are contributing to the patient/physician relationship. The following is a summary of the discussion, which can be viewed in its entirety via the video below.

Relationships in medicine are as important now as they were in the past. The difference is that today’s technology allows physicians and patients to communicate on a different level.  The panel listed some of the new technologies that are changing the dynamic between the patient and the physician, and how the balance of power has shifted. This led to a discussion on how some doctors view the empowered, digitally savvy patient as a challenge to their authority and expertise. Jamie suggests leading physicians gently towards a discussion on health technology, while Renza sees this as an opportunity to broaden the relationship between doctor and patient, fostering more openness and honesty in the relationship.  She suggests that patients interview their doctors in advance to find the level of collaboration they are happy with.

Speaking to the numbers of doctors who embrace new technologies, Denise suggests that this is a multi-factorial problem, encompassing people skills and financial remuneration. Michael Weiss, listening online to the discussion, asked the panel for their thoughts on the future of medicine being the convergence of ehealth, mobile health and social media. The panel are all in agreement that this is the future of medicine, and spent some time on the important role that social media has to play in supporting and educating patients. Blogs and Twitter chats are great vehicles for healthcare professionals to learn about the lived experience of a condition.

The discussion ended with each panellist offering one piece of advice to physicians to help them prepare for a future where patients are empowered by new technologies. Renza’s advice is to just step in there and offers the reassurance that the majority of patient sites online are very well moderated and provide accurate information.  This is not about replacing the doctor/patient relationship, but augmenting it.  Jamie refers to Dr. Charles Safran’s quote that patients are the most underutilized resource in healthcare, followed by Denise quoting that the patient is the first member of the medical team.  The discussion ends with Jamie’s call to patients to join the healthcare conversations online – to find answers and support and Renza emphasizing the peer-to-peer support and power of community that can be accessed online.

rob halkes's insight:

Everything in ehealth and telehealth has to do with improving data sharing, interaction and communication between the patient and his/her professional supporters. This is an inspring dicussion to this aim!

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Definition of Health 2.0 and Medicine 2.0: A Systematic Review

Definition of Health 2.0 and Medicine 2.0: A Systematic Review | eHealth - Social Business in Health | Scoop.it
Definition of Health 2.0 and Medicine 2.0: A Systematic Review
ABSTRACT

Background: During the last decade, the Internet has become increasingly popular and is now an important part of our daily life. When new “Web 2.0” technologies are used in health care, the terms “Health 2.0" or "Medicine 2.0” may be used.
Objective: The objective was to identify unique definitions of Health 2.0/Medicine 2.0 and recurrent topics within the definitions.
Methods: A systematic literature review of electronic databases (PubMed, Scopus, CINAHL) and gray literature on the Internet using the search engines Google, Bing, and Yahoo was performed to find unique definitions of Health 2.0/Medicine 2.0. We assessed all literature, extracted unique definitions, and selected recurrent topics by using the constant comparison method.
Results: We found a total of 1937 articles, 533 in scientific databases and 1404 in the gray literature. We selected 46 unique definitions for further analysis and identified 7 main topics.
Conclusions: Health 2.0/Medicine 2.0 are still developing areas. Many articles concerning this subject were found, primarily on the Internet. However, there is still no general consensus regarding the definition of Health 2.0/Medicine 2.0. We hope that this study will contribute to building the concept of Health 2.0/Medicine 2.0 and facilitate discussion and further research.

(J Med Internet Res 2010;12(2):e18)

During the last decade, the Internet has become increasingly popular and now forms an important part of our daily life [1]. In the Netherlands, the Internet is even more popular than traditional media like television, radio, and newspapers [2]. Furthermore, the impact of the Internet and other technological developments on health care is expected to increase [3,4]. Patients are using search engines like Google and Bing to find health related information. In Google, five percent of all searches are health related [5]. Patients can express their feelings on weblogs and online forums [3], and patients and professionals can use the Internet to improve communication and the sharing of information on websites such as Curetogether [6] and the Dutch website, Artsennet [7] for medical professionals. The use of Internet or Web technology in health care is called eHealth [1,8].

In 2004 the term “Web 2.0” was introduced. O’Reilly defined Web 2.0 as “a set of economic, social, and technology trends that collectively form the basis for the next generation of the Internet, a more mature, distinctive medium characterized by user participation, openness, and network effects” [9]. Although there are different definitions, most have several aspects in common. Hansen defined Web 2.0 as “a term which refers to improved communication and collaboration between people via social networking” [10]. According to both definitions, the main difference between Web 1.0 (the first generation of the Internet) and Web 2.0 is interaction [11]. Web 1.0 was mostly unidirectional, whereas Web 2.0 allows the user to add information or content to the Web, thus creating interaction. This is why the amount of “user-generated content” has increased enormously [12]. Practical examples of user-generated content are online communities where users can participate and share content. Examples are YouTube, Flickr, Facebook, and microblogging such as Twitter. Twitter, for example, improves communication and the sharing of information among health care professionals [13]....

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Review!

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