Social Anxiety
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Rescooped by Stephanie Miller from Digital-Trust.Org
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Why Facebook Stalking Makes Your Social Anxiety Worse And Doesn't Help ... - Medical Daily

Why Facebook Stalking Makes Your Social Anxiety Worse And Doesn't Help ... - Medical Daily | Social Anxiety | Scoop.it

Why Facebook Stalking Makes Your Social Anxiety Worse And Doesn't Help 


Via Jennifer Perry
Stephanie Miller's insight:

    This article answers a few questions I had from a previous one- that is, social media does indeed increase social anxiety.  Shannon Rauch, assistant professor of psychology at Benedictine University in Arizona, conducted an experiment to test whether getting to know someone via Facebook first would help reduce or increase social anxiety upon seeing them in person. Her findings show that despite being able to attain information about a person on the social media site beforehand, participants who "stalked" a person before meeting them in real life had higher arousal scores.

   What does this mean, then? Perhaps we just have to go back to the good ol' days of getting to know someone in person rather than creeping on their page for information. If you're ever going on a blind date or heading to a job interview, maybe it's best to resist the urge to look up your potential suitor or employer on Facebook. It could increase your chances at having a good time.

   What about people with social anxiety disorder? Again, from reading this, I would conclude that they should probably steer away from social media. The sites only create unrealistic expectations and beliefs about other people while also taking a hit on your own self esteem through comparison. Although it may be tempting to talk to people over the internet rather than in person, someone trying to overcome their disorder should probably stick to pushing through real life conversations. 

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Meeting face to face vs. meeting on Facebook -- new study on social anxiety - Science Codex

Science Codex
Meeting face to face vs. meeting on Facebook -- new study on social anxiety Science Codex New Rochelle, NY, March 4, 2014—Nearly a billion people use Facebook, the largest social networking site, but interacting with someone on social...
Stephanie Miller's insight:

   Although this article itself doesn't mention much but an introduction to a research article done by Mary Ann Liebert, the title did make me question something: is social media causing an increase in social anxiety?

   There's no denying that technology and social media has changed our ways of communicating. We're constantly connected and have the ability to talk to anyone with an available cell phone or computer. It's easy to communicate with others behind a screen, but what about when it comes to face-to-face interactions? Does our increase in technological conversations have a toll on our physical communication?

   Obviously I would have to do more research, but I suspect that social media is only harmful for those with social anxiety disorder. Even though it allows them to interact with others online without fear of stuttering or saying something "stupid" in person, it could possibly make it even harder for them to have interactions in real life. This could possibly extend to those who don't currently have social anxiety disorder as well. By constantly communicating virtually, this could perhaps cause otherwise healthy people to have troubles talking in person. Again, we need to ask, is social media causing an increase in social anxiety?

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Overcoming Social Anxiety with Meditation - About Meditation

Overcoming Social Anxiety with Meditation - About Meditation | Social Anxiety | Scoop.it
Studies show that Meditation is helpful in overcoming social anxiety. Read here you can find relief from social anxiety through mindful meditation.

Via Morgan Dix
Stephanie Miller's insight:

   Researchers at Stanford University suggest a possible reduction in social anxiety through meditation. Participants in the study had their brain activity observed in an MRI both before and after meditating. Adjectives were shown on a screen and the subjects were asked to decide if each word accurately described them.

   Participants were found to gravitate more towards positive words, such as "loved" or "admired," than negative attributions after meditation. The brain circuitry occurring at the words "weak" and "insecure" also seemed to calm after meditating.

   Although I don't believe meditation by itself could completely cure a person from their social anxiety, this research does show possible benefits coming from it. It could just be another supplement to add on to therapy and/or medication that could help one cope with anxiety and guide them towards recovery. 

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Rescooped by Stephanie Miller from Psychotherapy
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Health News - Study finds new pathway between social anxiety, willingness to help others

Health News - Study finds new pathway between social anxiety, willingness to help others | Social Anxiety | Scoop.it
Study finds new pathway between social anxiety, willingness to help others

Via CBT Interventions
Stephanie Miller's insight:

   Studies done by Scott Stoltenberg, UNL behavior geneticist, suggest that there is a correlation between social anxiety and one's willingness to help others. This correlation is officially known as the 5-HTTLPR triallelic genotype, a gene that affects the amygdala which is sensitive to threat. Those with the dominant gene were more likely to interpret someone needing help as a possible danger. However, having the dominant gene does not directly cause or result in social anxiety disorder or a hesitance to help those around you. The studies simply revealed that it had an influence on certain traits.

   This makes me wonder if helping others could possibly be used as another way to help treat social anxiety. Perhaps by having those with the disorder help others with little tasks, such as helping an elderly woman cross the street or put away some groceries, they can detach from themselves and learn to reinterpret possible threats. 

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Study reveals one simple trick to reduce social anxiety. - Discover Magazine (blog)

Study reveals one simple trick to reduce social anxiety. - Discover Magazine (blog) | Social Anxiety | Scoop.it
Study reveals one simple trick to reduce social anxiety.
Stephanie Miller's insight:

   According to this article, studies have shown that referring to oneself in third person upon introspection can help ease social anxiety. Doing so allows one to distance themselves from their own thoughts and see how they did from an outside perspective. This logic makes sense to me, considering those with social anxiety suffer from low self confidence, which then results in them projecting their thoughts of themselves onto others and believing that's how everyone sees them. By using third person, it could allow them to get out of their own head, even just for a moment, and possibly separate from their strong biases of oneself. Doing so could help them understand the reality of their situation and understand that not everyone has the same opinion of them as they do. 

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Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: A Different Approach to Anxiety Disorders - Social Work Helper

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: A Different Approach to Anxiety Disorders - Social Work Helper | Social Anxiety | Scoop.it
Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: A Different Approach to Anxiety Disorders
Social Work Helper
Most coping techniques that teach people how to handle their abnormal anxieties focus on skills that reduce, replace, and avoid discomfort.
Stephanie Miller's insight:

   This article discusses a new possible approach towards treating anxiety disorders. Typically those who suffer from an anxiety disorder learn various coping techniques, such as deep breathing, or go through cognitive behavioral therapy, where they learn to control and even change their distorted thoughts. With Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (otherwise known as ACT), patients are encouraged not to change their thoughts, but to change their reactions towards them.

   The three steps of ACT include acceptance, choose, and take action. One first has to accept the presence of their anxiety, and also how to approach it with compassion. Next they must choose which direction they want their life to go in. Do they want to remain a slave to their anxieties, or do they want to learn to work with them? Finally, the last step is to change one's behavior. It's necessary to confront their fears without allowing their anxieties to consume them.

   I can see how both ACT and CBT work well for different people, or perhaps even the same person at different points of their disorder. Personally, as someone who has dealt with fits of intense anxiety, I feel as though accepting one's anxiety is a crucial first step, but attempting to change those thoughts afterwards helps me more than simply accepting them. However, I do see how for some people it'd be easier to learn how to change their reactions than to change the thought process they have always known. 

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Predicting how patients respond to therapy: Brain scans could help doctors choose treatments for people with social anxiety disorder

Predicting how patients respond to therapy: Brain scans could help doctors choose treatments for people with social anxiety disorder | Social Anxiety | Scoop.it
A new study has found that brain scans of patients with social anxiety disorder can help predict whether they will benefit from cognitive behavioral therapy.

Via Dimitris Agorastos
Stephanie Miller's insight:

   MIT neuroscientists have recently found that how well a patient with social anxiety disorder responds to cognitive behavioral therapy could be predicted using brain scans. The study tested subjects by measuring brain activity as they looked at images of both angry and neutral faces. After 12 weeks of CBT, participants were tested again. What was found was those with higher levels of activity in visual processing areas during the brain scan were more likely to benefit from cognitive behavioral therapy. 

   My question is, what are the other types of treatment for those who didn't or won't respond as well to CBT? Does this research also apply to other types of therapy? Should those who reveal lower levels of visual processing simply stick to medication? I suppose further tests are needed.

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Social media raises teens' anxiety levels, Geisinger doc says - Sunbury Daily Item

Social media raises teens' anxiety levels, Geisinger doc says - Sunbury Daily Item | Social Anxiety | Scoop.it
Social media raises teens' anxiety levels, Geisinger doc says Sunbury Daily Item And with social media making photos, updates and commentary more accessible than ever, teens are often unable to escape the anxiety of everyday life as did their...
Stephanie Miller's insight:

   Social media is undoubtedly a part of every day life in our culture. It's nice to always be connected with all of our family and friends. However, a recent report made by the American Psychological Association claims this new phenomena may be part of the reason why so many of today's teens are more stressed than ever before.

   The study done found that 30% of teenage girls report feeling bad when comparing themselves to others on social media, and 39% say that how they come off to others on social media causes significant stress. As a teenager who went through my middle school and high school years with social media, I can say I relate. Not only do you feel the need to impress others in real life, but in the world of the internet as well. And because the internet is available 24/7, it's almost like you can never escape from striving for this perfected version of yourself to present to others.

  As said in the article, all that is needed to prevent these feelings are a sense of reality and using social media in moderation. Everything people post on these sites are done to paint a pretty picture, and they do not reveal every situation in a person's life. If people kept that in mind, and only used social media sites for the sole purpose of connecting with the people they care about, I'm sure the anxieties could be reduced.

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Ecstasy-Assisted Therapy for Social Anxiety? - PsychCentral.com

Ecstasy-Assisted Therapy for Social Anxiety? - PsychCentral.com | Social Anxiety | Scoop.it
Ecstasy-Assisted Therapy for Social Anxiety?

Via Giovanni Benavides
Stephanie Miller's insight:

   Ecstasy may no longer be only for raves and ragers. Studies have shown that the drug could possibly help those with social anxiety and even post-traumatic stress disorder. The drug has exhibited an influence on reducing fear of emotional harm while also creating feelings of social connections. Pure MDMA has recently been approved for testing its benefits on 12 adult autistic men suffering from social anxiety disorder. 

   Although this testing may prove that pure MDMA could be used to treat this disorder, I wonder how that outcome would affect possible substance abuse. Many people with social anxiety already use substances such as alcohol as an escape, and I fear that hearing ecstasy as a treatment could encourage some people to get the drug from the streets in order to avoid a visit from a licensed psychiatrist. This could lead to them creating a dependence on the contaminated and dangerous drug rather than the pure, medicated form. 

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\'Out-Of-Body\' Virtual Experience Could Help Social Anxiety

\'Out-Of-Body\' Virtual Experience Could Help Social Anxiety | Social Anxiety | Scoop.it
New virtual imaging technology could be used as part of therapy to help people get over social anxiety according to new research from the University of East Anglia (UEA).Research publishe ('Out-Of-Body' Virtual Experience Could Help Social Anxiety...

Via VERONICA LESTER
Stephanie Miller's insight:

   Medical News Today has covered a new possible treatment for social anxiety disorder: an "out-of-body" virtual experience. New technology could allow those with the disorder to see themselves interacting in virtual social interactions through projected life-size images of themselves in various situations, from a bar to a grocery store. By doing so, patients can see themselves from an outside perspective and realize that they don't bring as much negative attention to themselves as they once thought.

   Dr. Lina Gega, head researcher of the experiments for the treatment, found that the virtual experience helped her subjects question their interpretations of typical social cues. Participants were also encouraged to practice things such as small talk, eye contact, and resisting coping methods such as looking down at the floor. At the end of the study, it was seen to have positive benefits and could quite possibly be incorporated into cognitive behavioral therapy in the future.

   I feel as though this really could be a great help for people with social anxiety disorder. Although the scenarios are fake, it allows them to see themselves from another point of view and also practice possible real-life scenarios in a safe and controlled environment. I could definitely see this becoming a great tool towards helping people achieve recovery.

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LIVING WITH SOCIAL ANXIETY

I was real hesitant to upload this video but I decided why not, maybe it'll help someone out there. These are just things from my own struggle, I am not sayi...
Stephanie Miller's insight:

   This 16 year old girl decided to share her experience with social anxiety through posting a video on YouTube. She lists various experiences and little daily tasks that give her a great amount of anxiety. Although the video itself was interesting, what I found more intriguing were the comments under it. Many were from others with similar experiences, but a vast majority were comments discussing how she was, "overreacting" and "needs to get over herself." 

   This belief that people with social anxiety (or any other mental disorder, for that matter) are simply being dramatic is a big concern of mine. This stigma we have against psychological disorders is absolutely detrimental. It shows that we as a society need to bring an awareness to the reality of mental disorders, and help people understand that they are real. No one would tell a cancer patient to "get over" their illness, and it's time the same sympathy was given to those suffering from illnesses of the psychological variety. 

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