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Brain molecule regulating human emotion, mood uncovered

Brain molecule regulating human emotion, mood uncovered | slightly geek | Scoop.it
Scientists have discovered an enzyme called Rines that regulates MAO-A, a major brain protein controlling emotion and mood. The enzyme is a potentially promising drug target for treating diseases associated with emotions such as depression.

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Drinking hot chocolate could prevent ALZHEIMER'S by boosting blood flow to the brain

Drinking hot chocolate could prevent ALZHEIMER'S by boosting blood flow to the brain | slightly geek | Scoop.it
Researchers at Harvard Medical School found that drinking just two cups of hot chocolate a day helps protect elderly people from dementia. (This is fantastic!
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The Future of Sport Psychology

The Future of Sport Psychology | slightly geek | Scoop.it
Is sport psychology the new market inefficiency? (http://t.co/uxkQYImmQI #sportspsychology)
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Is It Possible To Think Without Language?

Is It Possible To Think Without Language? | slightly geek | Scoop.it
Language is so deeply embedded in almost every aspect of the way we interact with the world. What would our thoughts be like without it?

Via Nik Peachey
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OneSpring's curator insight, May 26, 2013 9:25 PM
Not strictly visualization... BUT very fascinating!
Mabel A. Opare - Ababio Ayita's comment, May 29, 2013 8:29 AM
Yes but it's really possible and fascinating indeed.
REMI BLUM-JONQUIERES's comment, May 29, 2013 11:04 AM
I believe that we can think using kind of emotions and visualizations. Maybe it is a universal communication like we can have in dreams
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This App Will Make You Feel Better, Using No Medicine At All

This App Will Make You Feel Better, Using No Medicine At All | slightly geek | Scoop.it

 

Daniel Jacobs also wants to use placebos for good. His new app, which he’s crowd-funding on Indiegogo, is an attempt to take the placebo out of the doctor’s office and into your home. He hopes it will make people feel better, and contribute further to placebo research.

 

You start by setting a goal: say, more joy or love in your life. Then, you choose someone to give you the placebo (maybe a friend or family member), what you want it to be (a pill, say), and where you want to take it (maybe a forest where you go running with a friend). You then "take" the placebo whenever you want to, following a pre-set ritual built into the app.

 

The point is to replicate what’s important about the placebo effect, which isn’t the pill itself, but the experience. "If we think about placebo as a transformational symbol, then people get to choose what placebo they want," says Jacobs. "It can be a pill, magic wand, holy book, communion wafer, or herbs. It just needs to be meaningful for them."


Via Josué Cardona
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Nikki Howell's comment, July 17, 2013 11:11 AM
I believe that could really work. I like it.
William Hanna's curator insight, July 25, 2013 10:58 AM

I completely believe in a "mind over matter" approach.  After all your body is capable of producing every drug you could ever find in a drug store.  What's even better, your body can administer the exact dose for the exact time required.  I kid you not!  The trick is to truely believe without a shadow of any doubt.

robyns tut's curator insight, September 26, 2013 5:01 AM

this app sounds very cool, however it makes me worry how much more we really want to depend on technology. When I first started reading the article i thought it looked amazing, but then I realised that I am on my phine so ofte anyway; always checkingfacebook and keeping in touch with friends, even when i have friends sitting right next to me. My phone destracts me from the here and the now, even though connection is great sometimes it blocks out life that is passing by so fast. Now there is something more we should depend on our Phones for, things that we should get from actual human interaction- Justine Pearce

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Soo Meta — Keep Stories Rolling

Soo Meta — Keep Stories Rolling | slightly geek | Scoop.it
Grab videos, pictures, text paragraphs from any source and turn them into short movies.

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Felipe Policarpo's curator insight, May 6, 2013 1:46 AM

Learning how to scoop it.

silvermanmc's curator insight, May 6, 2013 1:32 PM

nice tool for learning and developing analysis skills

 

Anne Macdonell's curator insight, May 14, 2013 8:19 AM

Great for flipping

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Why Facebook is blue: The science of colors in marketing - CodeProject

Free source code and tutorials for Software developers and Architects.; Updated: 10 Aug 2007 (RT @codeprojectnews: Why Facebook is blue: The science of colors in marketing: All that is gold does not glitter, Not all those who...
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MRI Fingerprinting: The 12-second scan that fingerprints tissues and diseases

MRI Fingerprinting: The 12-second scan that fingerprints tissues and diseases | slightly geek | Scoop.it

Getting an MRI can be an uncomfortable experience, particularly for a 40-minute or longer scan. In the US at least, it is also quite expensive—the same kind of scan costing just over $100 in France, for example, would undoubtedly cost over $1000 here. If the whole scan could be done in say, 12 seconds, the call to "make the patient the customer again" might be heard a little clearer. A new technique developed by a collaborative effort at Case Western University and Siemens, known as MRI Fingerprinting (MRF), promises to do just that.

While MRI is in principle a quantitative instrument, in practice, the results are typically best described as qualitative. If it were really quantitative, caregivers would probably discuss features of the scan more in terms of absolutes, ideally suffixed with appropriate units. Instead, we usually settle for the familiar, regions of hyper, or hypointensity to describe regions of anomaly.

 

MRF would be performed using the standard MRI hardware, but it draws on a set of new signal processing techniques falling under the rubric of compressive sampling. Engineers have been hammering out a novel approach to a broad class of problems arising in everything from telecommunications, to image acquisition and processing. Most recently in medicine, compressive sampling, or random sampling as it is sometimes called, has been applied to create high resolution endoscopic images.

 

To analogize how these new methods might actually work, let's imagine acquiring a natural image. It can be shown that if the image is acquired through a psuedo-random mask of sorts, much greater efficiency can generally be achieved. Intuitively we might expect that if the first 300 pixels of a seascape, for example, are all highly correlated blue sky, perhaps structuring the pixel acquisition in some other way could be more efficient.

 

The metaphor is obviously a simplification, but the key for MRF is rather than using rigidly defined and error-prone scans on the front end, all the data can be acquired up front using compressive sampling. Afterwards, pattern recognition techniques can be used in the post processing. While the fingerprint is not to be understood literally as a kind of DNA fingerprinting as used in forensic science, the process resembles matching a person's fingerprint to a database that can then draw up additional related information.

 

Following acquisition of the imaging data, a so-called "dictionary" containing the realistic range of standard MRI parameters (like relaxation times and off-resonance frequency) can be obtained with relatively modest computing resource. Other properties often obtained from MRI data such as diffusion and magnetization transfer can also be measured. These are the parameters behind the techniques now at our disposal for tracing the paths of axon tracts in the brain, in particular diffusion tractoctagraphy. The authors of the study conclude that in using MRF, the traditional imaging routine will be greatly simplified into an all-in-one scan. The dozens of parameters under operator control in current MRI machines could be replaced with a simple scan button, making MRI more routine, patient-friendly, and affordable.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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This Video Game Helps Kids Deal With Mental Health Issues

This Video Game Helps Kids Deal With Mental Health Issues | slightly geek | Scoop.it

gNats Island is designed to help adolescents overcome negative thoughts, anxiety, and depression. The graphic, character-based game is based on Cognitive Behavioral Therapy.

 

On the "island," players "meet" the negative automatic thoughts in the form of pesky "gNats" that have a "nasty sting." The Black and White gNat makes you think in extremes. The Complete Disaster gNat makes you think everything is a complete disaster, and so on. Almost 750 therapists in the U.S., Ireland and the UK have been trained to use the game with their young patients. 


Via Josué Cardona
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vyvyan's comment, September 9, 2013 2:21 AM
positive effect
robyns tut's curator insight, September 26, 2013 4:42 AM

when technology gets into a person's head for a good reason; I feel that this is true progress - Justine Pearce

robyns tut's comment, October 7, 2013 8:49 AM
this is such a clever idea its using technology to help people! awesome -shannon wilson
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Geek Bar to Open in Chicago - Huffington Post

Geek Bar to Open in Chicago - Huffington Post | slightly geek | Scoop.it
Geek Bar to Open in Chicago
Huffington Post
What nerd hasn't come home from San Diego Comic Con or Gen Con and not yearned for more?
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Survey shows that social media has graduated to academia : JISC

Survey shows that social media has graduated to academia : JISC | slightly geek | Scoop.it
A new survey of colleges across Scotland shows that social media, and particularly YouTube, has firmly entered the learning environment as teaching and learning tools, with their use growing significantly year on year.

Via Nik Peachey
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suzanne kamal's curator insight, June 8, 2013 11:48 PM

Interesting that social media is used in academic settings but access is still blocked in many educational environments!  Time for change?

Casey Anley's curator insight, June 10, 2013 4:36 AM

Interesting review

Charles Goodger's curator insight, June 11, 2013 3:30 AM

Read it!

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Top 10 Must & Important Free Windows Applications | Tech Web Stuff

Top 10 Must & Important Free Windows Applications | Tech Web Stuff | slightly geek | Scoop.it
Best & Must Have free windows applications to download with Ccleaner, Fences, TrueCrypt, Revo Uninstaller, 7Zip, Irfan View, Tweak UI, Unlocker, Launchy, Free Download Manager

Via Tiaan Jonker
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fareedullahzahid's comment, May 29, 2013 1:19 AM
good
jhon once's comment, May 30, 2013 11:55 PM
thanks, http://bestplanetseo.com/
Sean Tan's curator insight, May 31, 2013 7:06 PM

Quite important.

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Harvard Creates Beautiful, Self-Assembled Nanoflowers to Better Understand Nature

Harvard Creates Beautiful, Self-Assembled Nanoflowers to Better Understand Nature | slightly geek | Scoop.it

"The beautiful flowers that you see above, and dotted throughout the rest of this story, are around 25 micrometers tall and 10 micrometers wide. Even more impressively, these flowers self-assembled from three fairly normal chemical compounds. Rather than just an exercise in aesthetics, though, scientists hope these nanoflowers can improve our scientific understanding of how immensely complex structures in nature, such as human embryos, self-assemble."


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Our digital lives - TED Talks

Our digital lives - TED Talks | slightly geek | Scoop.it
Our hyper-connected lives have been rewired for the digital age. These talks explore how the Internet and social media are shaping our relationships, personal lives and sense of self.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Shanthi Cumaraswamy Streat's curator insight, May 3, 2013 6:47 AM

These look like great talks. Can't wait to watch them.

Mirjana Podvorac's curator insight, May 4, 2013 2:26 PM

In order not to get trapped in the web of one, to stay connected to new ideas, new people and get a different prospective!

Robin Kay's curator insight, May 8, 2013 9:23 AM

Haven't looked at these - but I bet they are good.

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Now confident: CERN physicists say new particle is Higgs boson (Update 3)

Now confident: CERN physicists say new particle is Higgs boson (Update 3) | slightly geek | Scoop.it
Physicists said Thursday they are now confident they have discovered a crucial subatomic particle known as a Higgs boson—a major discovery that will go a long ways toward helping them explain why the universe is the way it is.
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