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SLESL--Second Life for English as a Second Language - YouTube

Examples of how to teach English as a Second Life in the virtual world known as Second Life
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22 Online Tools That Will Help Learners With Improving Writing Skills

22 Online Tools That Will Help Learners With Improving Writing Skills | SLESL.net | Scoop.it
Here are at least 14 trusty online tools of all kinds to give your students the edge as they work on improving writing skills.

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elearning at eCampus ULg's curator insight, November 9, 2017 4:03 AM
Nice resources that should be share to all our students
Alison Rostetter's curator insight, November 10, 2017 3:42 AM
Writing is hard - whatever helps! 
Maribel Bañares's curator insight, November 14, 2017 8:23 AM
Share your insight
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Create Virtual Educational Theme Park for Kids

Create Virtual Educational Theme Park for Kids | SLESL.net | Scoop.it
Create Virtual Educational Theme Park for Kids

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David W. Deeds's curator insight, April 21, 2015 9:50 AM

Yes, let's do this! ;)

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Revolutionizing education: The virtual future of learning

Revolutionizing education: The virtual future of learning | SLESL.net | Scoop.it

There are monumental changes on the horizon. The future of education is as thrilling as it’s ever been, and although it’s impossible to predict all that is about to happen, we can be certain of some changes. 


Education will provide more opportunity for students to excel as unique individual learners. New technology and ways of thinking will allow for students with multiple learning styles to find their place in the classroom, for re-engineered classroom layouts, and for new paths to graduation through secondary education. 


If we embrace it with the right attitude, the future of education will be more capable and all-encompassing than it is now and than it ever has been.


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David W. Deeds's curator insight, November 7, 2016 9:14 PM

Geeky-cool stuff! Thanks to Kim Flintoff.

m.j. bragaña g.'s curator insight, November 8, 2016 4:53 PM
#SCEUNED16Ja ja ja ja
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Virtual Worlds and Education 

Virtual Worlds and Education  | SLESL.net | Scoop.it

I started using Second Life six years ago, while studying for my Postgraduate Diploma in Education (specializing in e-Learning Pedagogy). Since then, I've explored many other Virtual Worlds/Grids, like Kitely, InWorldz, other public and private OpenSim grids, as well as Sim-on-a-Stick (SoaS), and even the very promising (now apparently very dead) virtual-world-on-a-browser Cloud Party. Recently, I had the opportunity to share my views on the potencial of Second Life and other VW for education/training with educators who have never used any of these platforms.


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David W. Deeds's curator insight, September 15, 2016 8:19 PM

Good stuff! Thanks to CM Elias.

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These Diagrams Reveal How To Negotiate With People Around The World

These Diagrams Reveal How To Negotiate With People Around The World | SLESL.net | Scoop.it

You can't expect negotiations with French to be like negotiations with Americans, and the same holds true for cultures around the world.


British linguist Richard D. Lewis charted communication patterns as well as leadership styles and cultural identities in his book, "When Cultures Collide," now in a 2005 third edition. His organization offers classes in cross-cultural communication for big clients ranging from Unilever to BMW.


In support of cultural studies, he writes: "By focusing on the cultural roots of national behavior, both in society and business, we can foresee and calculate with a surprising degree of accuracy how others will react to our plans for them, and we can make certain assumptions as to how they will approach us. A working knowledge of the basic traits of other cultures (as well as our own) will minimize unpleasant surprises (culture shock), give us insights in advance, and enable us to interact successfully with nationalities with whom we previously had difficulty."


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How Are Your Manners?

How Are Your Manners? | SLESL.net | Scoop.it
Are you naturally polite or unbelievably rude? Discover what other people think of your etiquette.

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Barbara McQueen's insight:

Lots of fun surveys available on this site beyond this etiquette survey.

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Adjective Order Game ~ Strange Creatures 1 | EnglishClub

This jumbled sentence game helps you learn about and practise typical English adjective order. Strange Creatures 1. Fun to play. Helps grammar. Ideal for learners of English. Play free online.

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Immersive Virtual Reality: Online Education for the Next Generation

Immersive Virtual Reality: Online Education for the Next Generation | SLESL.net | Scoop.it
While distance learning has gained popularity over the past decade, it’s still not always the most exhilarating way to study. Although online courses cover cognitive skills just fine, students miss out on an important dimension of learning: engaging other intelligences and more intensive interactivity. In fact, only 4 percent of students who enroll in a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) will actually complete the course. Immersive virtual reality (VR) could radically change that experience.

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6 Reasons Why Gamification Enhances The Learning Experience 

6 Reasons Why Gamification Enhances The Learning Experience  | SLESL.net | Scoop.it

"Enhance your learning experience by utilizing gamification and rewards like certificates, badges, or points."


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Rosemary Tyrrell, Ed.D.'s curator insight, September 8, 2017 10:54 AM
Interesting. 
 
Judith Peterson's curator insight, September 11, 2017 5:03 PM
I have used Quia to create games to help my students learn the elements and principles of design and other art facts with my high school art classes. The games provided a safe place for them to test themselves on what they have learned. They excitedly shared their scores with their peers and took part in friendly competition. I was delighted that my entire class worked until they got 100%! Needless to say by the time they took their final exam, they were READY!
Michelle Audain's curator insight, September 12, 2017 10:49 PM

Learning is always easier when it's fun and gamification makes it addictive too!

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Atlanta puts OpenSim in every classroom – Hypergrid Business | Virtual Worlds & Gamification for Education and Business

Atlanta puts OpenSim in every classroom – Hypergrid Business | Virtual Worlds & Gamification for Education and Business | SLESL.net | Scoop.it
35 schools and 38,000 students, have access to a 3-D virtual world environment!

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Survey: 84% of OpenSim users would recommend platform – Hypergrid Business | Second Life and other Virtual Worlds | Virtual University: Education in Virtual Worlds - 27 and 28 October 2011

Survey: 84% of OpenSim users would recommend platform – Hypergrid Business | Second Life and other Virtual Worlds | Virtual University: Education in Virtual Worlds - 27 and 28 October 2011 | SLESL.net | Scoop.it
OpenSim users overwhelmingly said that they would “absolutely” recommend the platform to others.

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The 10 Best Fact Checking Sites

The 10 Best Fact Checking Sites | SLESL.net | Scoop.it
7/20/16 The purpose of this website is not only to deliver news, but to also be a resource on media bias and fact checking.  When checking facts these are the 10 sites we find to be most valuable.  In most cases, one of these sites has already covered the fact check we are seeking, making the job easy.  Listed below you will find our favorite (most trusted) fact checking websites.  Bookmark them or just visit MBFC News and we will filter them for you. Politifact– PolitiFact is a fact-checking website that rates the accuracy of claims by elected officials and others who speak up in American politics. PolitiFact is run by editors and reporters from the Tampa Bay Times, an independent newspaper in Florida.  Politifact is simply the best source for political fact checking.  Won the Pulitzer Prize. Fact Check– FactCheck.org is a project of the Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania.  They are a nonpartisan, nonprofit “consumer advocate” for voters that aims to reduce the level of deception and confusion in U.S. politics. They monitor the factual accuracy of what is said by major U.S. political players in the form of TV ads, debates, speeches, interviews [...]

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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, February 19, 7:34 AM
The 10 Best Fact Checking Sites
Lisa Davis's curator insight, September 18, 6:51 PM
"A good fact checking service will write with neutral wording and will provide unbiased sources to support their claims. Look for these two simple criteria when hunting for the facts." ~ mediabiasfactcheck.com
Al Cannistra's curator insight, September 19, 9:22 AM

FACT CHECKING - check it out!

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Journalism: How One University Used Virtual Worlds to Tell True Stories

Journalism: How One University Used Virtual Worlds to Tell True Stories | SLESL.net | Scoop.it
Journalism: How One University Used Virtual Worlds to Tell True Stories By Leonard Witt, Farooq A. Kperogi, Gwenette Writer Sinclair, Claire Bohrer and Solomon Negash This case study demonstrates a relatively low-cost, quick-startup project that advances work in virtual world immersive journalism; in this case, to amplify the voices of often marginalized youth in the…
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Virtual Reality is the Future of Career Education

Virtual Reality is the Future of Career Education | SLESL.net | Scoop.it
Virtual Reality will be omnipresent in 5 years. It is hard to find now. It is completely missing in career education. Who will take a leadership role?

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Lochlan Finney's curator insight, March 25, 2015 9:42 AM

This article talks about one of the many future uses of VR, as a means of education. You asked us what we thought the future of technology is, well Sir, I do believe this is it.

Brock Nicholls's curator insight, March 27, 2015 9:34 AM

Pfaff, J (1 March, 2015). Virtual Reality is the Future of Career Education. EduKWest.http://www.edukwest.com/virtual-reality-is-the-future-of-career-education/


This article is an expansion on the idea of virtual reality and what it can do for us. It explains that virtual reality has the possibility of providing us with real life work experiences. Mentions the oculus also and discusses the potential of providing many people across the world at once a unique experience of the scenario in real time. Author states he himself is jumping on board and others should also try filling the gap between VR and online education. Technology allowing people to have a in-depth life like experience before having to really experience it is obviously important and will be massive if done properly.

Benjamin Johnson's curator insight, March 28, 2015 1:06 AM

Difficult to imagine all of the 'in-between' steps between where we are now and being hard-wired into direct-to-brain electrode stimulation.

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3 uses of Virtual Reality in workplace education

3 uses of Virtual Reality in workplace education | SLESL.net | Scoop.it
Best content around CLO Benefits selected by the eLearning Learning community.

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Carlos Fosca's curator insight, August 1, 2016 10:24 AM

La realidad virtual es sin duda una de estas tecnologías que va a revolucionar el mundo del mañana. Por el momento, lo más importante para esta industria es hacerla asequible y sostenible, pues los costos de desarrollar escenarios con muy alta definición y realismo son muy elevados. Pero hoy todos están detrás de encontrar  el modelo de negocio que masifique su uso. 

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How To Say Sorry Across Cultures | Textappeal

How To Say Sorry Across Cultures | Textappeal | SLESL.net | Scoop.it
Major brands have recently made shocking translation (and transcreation) gaffes — and have come begging for forgiveness. It is more important than ever to know how to apologise locally for a global campaign or brand misfire, especially in an always-on, international culture…



We have already talked about how lightly brands need to tread in a world where everyone is watching, where companies have unprecedented access not only to an enormous raft of potential consumers, but also to the ever-vigilant eyes of potential critics. “Trial by Twitter” is a process that has found many brands guilty, and unfortunate gaffes are never far from mind. Take Waitrose’s social media misfire last autumn, where its “Reasons” campaign was hijacked and turned on its head by teasing tweeters. Rather than issuing an apology as such, they did feel they had to acknowledge the jocular nature of people’s reactions. Other brands to have faced similar cyber-ribbing have reacted in various ways, either by adopting a similarly ribald tone, or by going on an unrepentant offensive, as this blog post discusses. And we can’t forget the reaction to Nick Clegg’s apology video, which went viral last year and totally undermined his attempt to clear the air with the British electorate.

People around the world apologise in different ways. In Japan, the act of apologising is considered a virtue (more on this later). It is no surprise, therefore, that their language and culture have such a diffuse number of ways to express the sentiment of sorriness. The same cannot always be said of the West, where people can often be found saving face by issuing ‘apologies’ that are entirely devoid of any sincerity or meaning. Or the classic British reflex-action apology, where “sorry” is used so unsparingly that it is roughly akin to “hmmm”.

Whatever the ‘right’ approach, there can be little doubt that the apology is an important art when errors in communication are so easy and public. And things only get more complicated when that apology has to be made across cultures, where different conventions, traditions and politics, not to mention different languages, are at play. Last week, Apple found themselves issuing a public apology to their Chinese customers following criticism from state media outlets about the company’s warranty terms. The apology received extensive news coverage across the country, to the bewilderment of many Chinese people, who found the authorities’ glee at events somewhat baffling compared to the veritable silence over more significant matters of public interest. What was perhaps most interesting about Apple’s apology was the way it was worded – “At the same time,” they said, “we also realize that we have much to learn about operating in China, and how we communicate here.” In this knowledge, a comprehensive global communication audit might have saved any embarrassment, taking advantage of local expertise and insight to achieve a “finger on the pulse” – essential for survival in the modern technology jungle.

As we’ve already mentioned, the cross-cultural apology is a complicated process due to the linguistic, political and cultural considerations that need to be taken on board. Indeed, an episode at the end of 2012 shows the extent of the complications in China, with the reporting of an “apology” made by the new Leader of the Communist Party, Xi Jinping. When arriving late for a speech, he made a comment which literally translates as “made everyone wait a long time”. Does this mean “sorry”? According to the presiding English interpreter, it did. Later on, however, opinion was divided among observers, with some objecting to translations from various international media outlets that played up the “sorry” aspect, while others felt the literal translation – with its more unrepentant connotations – was appropriate.

An extreme example of how cultural conventions can differ came with the public apology offered by Japanese popstar Minami Minegishi following revelations that she had spent the night with her boyfriend. She appeared with a shaved head, begging the public for forgiveness in a traditional act of contrition.

There is no escaping the fact that, were the divas of Europe or the US to so flail themselves for such minor misdemeanours, the blogosphere would be utterly saturated. Yes, it might have been over the top and unnecessary, but it was also on some level based on cultural tradition.

These examples show the challenges faced by brands operating internationally, and the need for expert, sensitive cross-cultural communications strategies. Saying sorry is never easy. Saying sorry across a cultural divide is even harder…

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What It's Really Like Dating Someone Who Speaks A Different Language

What It's Really Like Dating Someone Who Speaks A Different Language | SLESL.net | Scoop.it
You know that feeling when you’re both snuggled up on the sofa and your partner turns to look at you and says, “Is there a word in English meaning ‘to defile corpses’?” No? Well, chances are you’re not in a bilingual relationship.
American Zach and his Hungarian fiancé Janka both work for online language hub Babbel. But when you’re dating cross-culturally, discussions about super niche verbs are by no means confined to the office. “We love teaching each other idioms and colloquialisms in our native language. Hungarian is a very colourful language,” says Zach.
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But not sharing a first language can come with its frustrations. The couple tend to speak English together which for Zach means simplifying. Janka meanwhile struggles with the limitations of her second language.
“In Hungarian you can take any noun and make it a verb – she could say she was ‘Zaching’ meaning spending time with me – and she gets frustrated she can’t do that in English,” says Zach. “We have a lot of words that we say in Hungarian because there isn’t an English equivalent.”
Despite the challenges of building a relationship across a language barrier, dating “without borders” is on the rise. According to a study by Eurostat, nearly 9 per cent of marriages in the UK include a foreign-born spouse while across Europe nearly 30% of people cited love as their reason for moving to another country.
On Valentine's Day this year the post-Brexit diversity campaign One Day Without Us launched the #loveknowsnoborders hashtag to celebrate cross-cultural relationships, one of the oft-untold benefits of freedom of movement. But how easy is it to fall in love when you don’t speak the same language? British Ben described his first date with Spanish girlfriend Jennifer as “interesting.”
“For the first couple of months of our relationship, our hands were covered in ink from where we’d taught each other words in the pub with nothing to write on,” he says.
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For Greek Eleni and her German husband Sebastian, the challenge was in finding ways to translate things into English that felt specific to their own cultures. “One of Seb’s favourite phrases is das Leben ist kein Wunschkonzert which he literally translates as 'Life is not a musical request programme',” said Eleni. “There are also times where we think we are speaking correctly but we're unconsciously translating an expression from our mother tongue. Seb told me recently I frequently use 'let's say' in sentences which is a literal translation of something we use a lot in Greek. I never realised I did it!”
And it’s not just limited vocab that can affect your relationship. According to Babbel’s head of didactics, Katja Wilde, people can even take on different character traits when speaking different languages.
“You’re not the same person that you are in your mother tongue. You see people who have another voice in a different language. Some people even speak louder in one language than another,” she says.
“Italians tend to interrupt each other but in German you can’t do that because the verb comes at the end so speaking another language can change your whole approach.”
Diana, who met her Polish husband Jakub in Texas before the couple moved to London, says she recognises this. “Jakub often uses the ‘I'm Polish, I'm a foreigner’ excuse to say shit native speakers wouldn't dare,” she says. “I don’t think he does this in Polish.”
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And then there are the misunderstandings, the awkward faux-pas. British Matthew recalls the time his German girlfriend Jessie told him she was “going to sleep around now”. It transpired she’d directly translated the German phrase Ich schlafe eine Runde. She meant to say she was going for a nap.
Diana tells me the first time she met her husband’s father, she accidentally called him “Daddy”, not realising what the Polish word meant.
“Jakub refers to his dad as Tatuś, which translates directly as Daddy,” she says. “I was trying to show him where to sit I said ‘Tatuś’ and pointed to the seat. He just looked at me in shock. All the Poles found it hilarious and I felt like an idiot. I still call him Tatuś because now it’s a running joke.”
And Zach’s attempts to speak Hungarian have gone awry at times. “The classic one in Hungary is egészségére which means “cheers” or “to your health” but if you say it wrong it means “to your whole bottom” and I’ve done that,” he says.
The hardest part is spending time with your partner’s friends and family, something most of the couples I spoke to could relate to. “When we visit Jakub’s family he pretty much has to translate everything for me,” says Diana. “A lot of the time I have no idea what they’re talking about and often feel quite isolated and lonely, even though I'm surrounded by people.”
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But all were quick to point to the benefits, not least the feeling that you’re constantly learning and growing together. “It's exciting to try to explain and share something and introduce someone else to it,” says Eleni. “I use the word opa like saying “oops”. Seb has used it a couple of times in context and it really made me smile.”
Diana agrees: “To this day Jakub still comes across words he doesn't know. Just this morning I taught him 'austere'.”
A recent study showed couples in cross-cultural relationships report higher relationship satisfaction than those who date people of their own nationality. Wilde says one reason might be that people in bilingual relationships have to work harder. “You really need to communicate a lot to make yourself understood and to understand,” she says. “Bilingual couples have to discuss and explain everything so much more.”
This certainly rings true for Ben and Jennifer. “We've learnt that both patience and clarity are our friends,” says Ben.
“But speaking in a clearer, simpler way actually helps eliminate second guessing and the 'reading between the lines' that can often happen in relationships.” Anyone for language classes?
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Bryce Morris's curator insight, March 10, 2017 9:55 AM
This article relates to our chapter 5 because it talks about how they try to learn each other languages. I think it was cool that there are so many kind of languages I have never even heard about.
Savanna Smith's curator insight, March 10, 2017 11:36 AM
This article relates to our chapter because dating someone who speaks a different language is an example of diversity with languages. My opinion on this that if you want to do it and feels comfortable learning the different language that the other person speaks, then do it.
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Grammar Gamble - the online English grammar test

Grammar Gamble - the online English grammar test | SLESL.net | Scoop.it

Play Grammar Gamble, the online English grammar quiz, and beat the scores of your friends.

Grammar Gamble is based on the popular classroom activity. Players choose the answer to a grammar question and 'bet' points depending on how confident they are. At the end of the game they can share their final scores on Facebook or Twitter.

 


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Scrabble Blast - online scrabble game

Fun vocabulary practice


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Quiz - Do you ACTUALLY Know English?

Quiz - Do you ACTUALLY Know English? | SLESL.net | Scoop.it
Find out if you're in good grammatical standing with the English language!

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Why Virtual Reality has the Potential to Transform Education as We Know It

Why Virtual Reality has the Potential to Transform Education as We Know It | SLESL.net | Scoop.it

"Virtual reality has been on the radar since Morton Heilig’s Sensorama in the 1950s, and head mounted versions of the technology were even around in the 1960s. But it wasn’t until recently that its use has become less of a novelty and more of a commonality. Console games and smartphone adapters have brought the potential of virtual reality into the lives of everyday people. And soon, that technology will enter the classroom."


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Medical Schools Turn to Simulation | HealthWorks Collective | Education in Virtual Worlds

Medical Schools Turn to Simulation | HealthWorks Collective | Education in Virtual Worlds | SLESL.net | Scoop.it
New York University medical students are moving beyond the traditional cadaver of anatomy class to dissect a virtual model made by BioDigital Systems, reports the New York Times. It's pretty ... A Social Media Today community ...

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Ten Reasons why Games Based Learning Works in Education | 3D Virtual Worlds: Educational Technology

Ten Reasons why Games Based Learning Works in Education | 3D Virtual Worlds: Educational Technology | SLESL.net | Scoop.it
Familiarity – Most students use technology regularly at home, so integrating technology and games based learning into their school life can be very quick and easy. 2. Engagement – Games based learning can be engaging ...

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Serious Games and Virtual Worlds in Education, ...

Serious Games and Virtual Worlds in Education, ... | SLESL.net | Scoop.it
Too often the suggestion of using games and virtual environments in an educational setting is met with skepticism and objections.

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