Wearable technologies in design research
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Kitty Ireland: Grandma was a Lifelogger

Kitty Ireland: Grandma was a Lifelogger | Wearable technologies in design research | Scoop.it
Decades before apps, GPS, and even personal computing, people kept track of their lives by writing things down. Kitty Ireland’s grandmother was one of these people. When Kitty stumbled upon her grandmother’s diaries and started to explore the daily entries, … Continue reading →
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A modern lifelogger discovered her grandma's diary from 1942 - who also was a lifelogger, without a narrative clip or a google glass. 

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Chris Woebken I Animal Superpowers

Chris Woebken I Animal Superpowers | Wearable technologies in design research | Scoop.it

The ant apparatus allows you to feel like an ant by magnifying your vision 50x through microscope antennas in your hand. You can perceive all the tiny cracks and details of a surface through this. It allows you to 'see' through your hands and to dive into a secret and hidden world.

 

The bird device, which uses a GPS system and vibrates when you're oriented in a certain direction, say towards an ice cream shop, home, or your pet. It approximates birds' detection of geomagnetic fields to find their way south in the winter and north in the spring.

 

The giraffe device is really simple and has a very direct effect. It acts as a child to adult converter by changing your voice to lower octaves and raising your perspective by 30cm. Kids can suddenly see on the same level as adults, allowing kids to experience a new perspective.

 
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Using wearable to simulate animal superpowers

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Online Qualitative Research - Potentially Misleading?

Online Qualitative Research - Potentially Misleading? | Wearable technologies in design research | Scoop.it

One of the papers that stuck in my mind at the recent ESOMAR Qualitative Conference in Valencia, Spain,  was on the topic of "online" versus "offline" identity. Entitled "Freedom to Reveal or Freedom to Project" and given by Peter Totman of London based Jigsaw Research ( http://bit.ly/IUD9kQ), it outlined the results of a qualitative project comparing the views of people given in a face-to-face versus an online context. 

The discussion topics were relatively emotive: immigration and sexism. A split design was employed, with five of the 10 respondents sharing their views face-to-face first, then giving their online views - with the rest in the opposite order.

The meta-level results were startlingly clear: 

Online persona were often very different to real-life observed identitiesOpinions expressed differed strongly online versus face-to-face

1. Multi-Modal Studies are the Gold Standard

2. If you wish for Depth of Insight, go Offline.

3. Online Interpretation requires honed Language and Reading Skills

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The overall insight was: what you see online is only one version of "the truth".

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Your Sensored Life: An Expanded View of Quantified Self

Your Sensored Life: An Expanded View of Quantified Self | Wearable technologies in design research | Scoop.it
Nhung Nguyen's insight:

I tend to think of quantified self beyond just wearable gear and self-tracking. In my mind, the trend is more about how aspects of our lives have become, or are fast becoming, quantified (or sensored) which raises significant societal issues. For the Gartner audience, the key issues are more related to how business and IT strategists should respond to this confluence of trends.

 

Major brands (e.g., Nike) are strategically providing consumers with such community environments (Figure 1: Digital Business). Wearable devices, mobile self-tracking apps, and the self-tracking information people share with community members provides business strategists (e.g., digital marketers, product/service teams, and innovation groups), with opportunities to engage audiences in new ways, build more collaborative customer relationships, and gain a competitive edge.

 

The network effects arising from quantified self have led me to examine a variety of different impacts ranging from accelerators like Rock Health (Figure 1: Funding & Business Development), to fashion issues (Figure 1: Society at Large), and how organizations might position quantified self within wellness programs – in turn, leveraging enterprise social networking platforms for the personal support and community aspects (Figure 1: Workforce Engagement). Down the road, the types of self-track apps and supporting services for quantified self could intersect with smart machines such as smart advisors and virtual personal assistants (Figure 1: Internet of Things).

 
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Sensors and Citizens: Finding Balance in the New Urban Reality

Sensors and Citizens: Finding Balance in the New Urban Reality | Wearable technologies in design research | Scoop.it

You have a front row seat. Unfortunately it is the driver’s seat of your family car and a multi-vehicle accident just unfolded before your eyes. People are almost certainly injured. Traffic is backing up in all directions. As you take out your smartphone to report an emergency, you notice that first responders are already on the scene. Small aerial drones have honed in on your location and incident information is being streamed to a control center. Traffic management and dashboard navigation systems across the city have been updated and rerouting has begun. Have the victim’s medical records been accessed using their personal digital identifiers?

Nhung Nguyen's insight:

The combination of mobile platforms, advanced sensors, and information networks—together with systems for data fusion, 3D modelling, computer vision, and machine learning—are transforming the way we understand and interact with our world. These capabilities cumulate in intelligent city models that include detailed infrastructure information, both above and below ground, indoors and out. Combined with information on pollution, weather, transportation, property data, green infrastructure, demographics, crime patterns, or emergency response models, future cities start to become as immersive in silico as they are in reality. But first, the fusion all of this data represents an epic big data challenge.

  

These elements make for an interesting interplay. Grassroots access to participatory, open, and accessible crowdsourced spatial information can be in tension, or in concert, with control systems orchestrated by governments or corporate entities. For bureaucracies, the proposition of adopting crowdsourced data can be vexing. Nonetheless, the value of doing so seems certain to outweigh associated apprehensions. Integrating crowdsourced data together with centrally managed sensor networks makes sense, not only because of the additional richness of the data it offers, but because of the powerful new forms of participatory citizenship it facilitates.

 
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The future of biosensing wearables -

The future of biosensing wearables - | Wearable technologies in design research | Scoop.it
This has been a year marked with pessimism about the future of biosensing wearables. We’re not buying it. For the past 15 months, Rock Health has been conducting industry research on the growing wearables and biosensors market, and we mean growing. Venture funding of biosensors and wearable technology increased 5X from 2011-2013—more than double the …

Via Cecile Chelim
Nhung Nguyen's insight:

Today there are an overwhelming number of trending wearables, but not all of them are capable of measuring or telling us something about our health. Similarly, there are plenty of biosensors that measure physiological inputs but do not have a wearable form factor. That’s why biosensing wearables are exciting: they allow for continuous physiological monitoring in a wide range of wearable form factors.

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QS Resource Guide

Quantified Self (QS) was originally defined as self knowledge through numbers. More precisely, it is the process of extracting personal meaning from person
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Extensive links to all things you like to know about QS

 

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Overexposed? Camera Phones Could Be Washing Out Our Memories

Overexposed? Camera Phones Could Be Washing Out Our Memories | Wearable technologies in design research | Scoop.it
When you snap lots of photos, psychologists say you're subconsciously relying on the camera to remember the experience for you. And your memory, they say, may suffer because of it.
Nhung Nguyen's insight:

Henkel says it's also a mistake to think of photographs as memories. The photo will remain the same each time to you look at it, but memories change over time. Henkel likens it relying on photos to remember your high school graduation.

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Portable video fieldkits for use in Digital Anthropology MSc

GoThis video (filmed and edited by Kevin Biderman, a student in UCL's Digital Anthropology MSc) profiles the portable video fieldkits we developed for use with...


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Jess Erhart's curator insight, May 22, 2014 7:38 PM

A good video highlighting how the toolkit for ethnography has changed since 2011

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Narrative Clip Teardown - YouTube

Becky Stern and Ladyada look inside the Narrative Clip lifelogging camera: https://learn.adafruit.com/narrative-clip-teardown -------------------------------...
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How Narrative Clip works & what's inside it.

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A New Vision for Humanitarians and Open Data

A New Vision for Humanitarians and Open Data | Wearable technologies in design research | Scoop.it
Humanitarian work is rapidly evolving. As crises emerge and unfold, digital technologies and networked communities are changing the way information is collected, distributed, analyzed, and acted upon. The UN’s Office for the
Nhung Nguyen's insight:

The report argues that:

Information needs to be seen as a basic need in humanitarian response.The ways in which humanitarian information is collected, shared, and analysed need to change fundamentally.There is a need to create new capacities and ways of thinking in aid organizations and governments to understand and use new information sources.New technologies also bring new risks and humanitarians will need to develop guidelines to ensure that information is used in an ethical and secure manner.
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Lifelogger- POV video camera and processing software!

LifeLogger's team is working to bring you the ultimate POV wearable video camera along with the best processing software!
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Narrative Clip – Photographic memory for everybody | Wearable Technologies

Narrative Clip – Photographic memory for everybody | Wearable Technologies | Wearable technologies in design research | Scoop.it

The photographic memory is not only interesting for private individuals; the company has also received many inquiries from the areas of security and market research. For the future, Kalmaru sees many possibilities to enrich the photographic lifelog with additional contextual information.


For example, pictures recorded by different users at events such as concerts could be shared among one another. Also, it might be possible to compile 360° views out of multiple shots taken by different users. For the young market segment, Kalmaru foresees a large growth potential.


First, it’s a question of „fostering a cultural familiarization, as previously with mobile phones“, with using wearable cameras. In the intermediate future, photographic memory could play an important role in conjunction with a multitude of other self-tracking inputs.

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Wear Are We?: A medical device that can interface with brainwaves finds us pondering the trajectory of wearable technology | UX Magazine

Wear Are We?: A medical device that can interface with brainwaves finds us pondering the trajectory of wearable technology | UX Magazine | Wearable technologies in design research | Scoop.it

It’s interesting that this kind of technology is finally poking into the mainstream just as wearable technology is getting its toehold. While we might most readily associate “wearable” with interactive screens strapped to our wrists that tell us when to stop eating ice cream, something sleek that sits on a user’s head and reads brainwaves points to the emergence of an even deeper connection between humans and technology—one that could easily lead embedded technology.


“When we design a coffee maker, we think shape, context of use, etc. When we design wearables, the intimacy level is so much higher that we cannot avoid considering how these devices literally change who we are and our bodily engagement with the world … One buys a Fitbit because they desire to be seen as fitness-conscious, just as much as they seek truth in quantification. Their exercise routine or daily walks are an act of designing a better self, so the device simply becomes part of that ecosystem.”

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What Will It Take to Make Your Grandma’s Wearable? | UX Magazine

What Will It Take to Make Your Grandma’s Wearable? | UX Magazine | Wearable technologies in design research | Scoop.it
Wear … er, Where’s the UX?

UX doesn’t only imply an easy interface, it includes solving problems and providing a service that is of value to the user. So far, everything that’s been offered only appeals to the tech savvy consumer. What the iPhone offered was usability and empathy—things everyone wanted. Wearables will have to rise to the same challenge. They will have to provide valued services without being obtrusive and without causing the users extraneous learning pains.

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Google Glass as a Qualitative MR Tool -- We’ll Need Some Apps for That

Google Glass as a Qualitative MR Tool -- We’ll Need Some Apps for That | Wearable technologies in design research | Scoop.it

As a Google Glass Explorer, I don’t think Glass or any other augmented-reality device is the silver bullet that’s going to solve our biggest challenges as marketing researchers, but it does have so...

Nhung Nguyen's insight:

1. Providing a live, streaming video feed to research observers, who can be located anywhere in the world


2. Offering a way for observers to communicate in real-time with the moderator – great for unobtrusive follow-up or “probing” questions.


3. Delivering an additional read on a participant’s physical and emotional response through eye-tracking, pupil dilation, heart rate monitoring, etc. 

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Mobile Qualitative - How Does It Fit In The Research Toolkit? | GreenBook

Mobile Qualitative - How Does It Fit In The Research Toolkit? | GreenBook | Wearable technologies in design research | Scoop.it

Mobile qual. goes the final 3 – 4 yards, to quote Steve, it “puts us into people’s back pockets”.

Face-to-face qual., by contrast, has systematic limitations:

momentary and thereby limited to point-in-time snap-shotsreliance on memoryempathy gap (an inability to imagine our “hot state” reactions when in a “cold state” of non-arousal)

Revelation summarizes how they see the advantages of online mobile qualitative:

ongoing dialogue (as opposed to a point-in-time snapshot)immediacy: participants can record meaningful moments as they happenCapture reactions more vividly, minimizing the process of distortion through rationalization. Mobile can get closer to System 1 type reactions.easily-executed self-recordingability to show not just tell (through use of photos, videos)Directly access areas of the home that a laptop wouldn’t easily get to.cost and reach (geographic restrictions are overcome,  travel is eliminated, saving both out-of-pocket and opportunity costs)non-intrusive
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How Wearable Technology Will Impact Web Design | Trends

How Wearable Technology Will Impact Web Design | Trends | Wearable technologies in design research | Scoop.it

A lot of naysayers are quick to write off wearable technology as a fad, but a recent report from Pew Research Center Internet Project indicates that 83% of industry experts believe that wearable technology will see huge growth within the next 10 years. By 2025, we’ll be fully immersed in the Internet of Things (IoT). This means that users will be accessing websites from various platforms, not just desktops and mobile devic

Nhung Nguyen's insight:

7 considerations for wearable tech web design:

1. Responsive

2. Instant

3. Interactive

4. Minimalist

5. Larger text

6. Ostracised pop-ups

7. Intuitive design

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The History of Wearable Technology: A timeline - ZDNet

The History of Wearable Technology: A timeline - ZDNet | Wearable technologies in design research | Scoop.it
Financial Post The History of Wearable Technology: A timeline ZDNet Wearable technology is all the rage in 2014, forming one of the key themes at the giant CES show in January and getting a conference and expo all to itself in London a couple of...

Via Jess Erhart
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Jess Erhart's curator insight, June 4, 2014 10:46 PM

Quite detailed timeline outlining the history of wearable technology

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How to use ethnography for in-depth consumer insight | Analysis | Marketing Week

How to use ethnography for in-depth consumer insight | Analysis | Marketing Week | Wearable technologies in design research | Scoop.it
Studying consumers in their natural habitat can provide valuable insight – and mobile technology is making it easier.
Nhung Nguyen's insight:

“Ethnography isn’t just about filming an interview with your customers,” he explains, “You’re looking for contradictions between what people say they do and what they actually do.”


He says: “The absence of an observer in the living room makes things even more natural. It’s also between three and five times cheaper than traditional ethnography, which means we can do it more frequently and cover more markets.”

 


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STEP Journal for Google Glass v0.1 | MAR 25

STEP Journal for Google Glass v0.1 | MAR 25 | Wearable technologies in design research | Scoop.it

Google Glasses is a smart eyewear and STEP Journal is a smart journal. Keeping these two in mind, I have set the MVP (minimum viable product) of STEP Journal for Glass as “an easy journaling of things we see”. For example, a person can take a picture with Glass, send it to STEP Journal and get a step (entry) created enriched with contextual information on the point of presence.

Nhung Nguyen's insight:

Using Google Glass for lifelogging

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3 Business Tasks You Can Make Easier with Location Data

3 Business Tasks You Can Make Easier with Location Data | Wearable technologies in design research | Scoop.it
Track Your Mileage Without Thinking

As an added bonus, you can collect data about the mileage you’ve traveled without a car more efficiently this way: even though you don’t have an odometer for your bicycle or your feed, you can get a mileage count without having to try to calculate the distance between two points on a map.

Understand How Long You Spend at Clients’ Locations

If your work regularly takes you out of your office and into a client’s location, having an accurate record of the time you’re actually on-site is crucial. If you need to track billable hours, you have to have that time — but it also comes in handy for understand how you’re spending your time. 

Know When You’re Really at the Office

While this sort of record comes in handy when you’re double-checking your time sheets, it may also help you spot some key problems. Is your boss regularly asking you for overtime? Do you routinely need to stay late to make sure you handle all of your projects? Are you working hours that make sense given your salary?

Nhung Nguyen's insight:

Potential insights for business - drawn from simple geolocation function of a smartphone/wearable tech.

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Five apps that show Google Glass will overcome the ‘naff’ factor

Five apps that show Google Glass will overcome the ‘naff’ factor | Wearable technologies in design research | Scoop.it

Highlights With Google Glass now available to buy, here are five consumer applications with capabilities that will outweigh the ‘naff’ factor, writes Bobby Gersbach, digital manager at Vizeum, in this guest post.


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Jess Erhart's curator insight, May 27, 2014 7:28 PM

Highlights five applications for Google Glass

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This Backpack Vaporizes Your Data And Puts You Behind A Smokescreen

This Backpack Vaporizes Your Data And Puts You Behind A Smokescreen | Wearable technologies in design research | Scoop.it
Designer Ji Won Jun designed a wearables prototype that nods to privacy concerns.
Nhung Nguyen's insight:

You can use the machine in two ways. Either you can crush up your own data and buy yourself some personal space. Or you can go ahead and destroy the data of the unsavory thieves around you. What's cool is the concept of destroying your private data (and perhaps other people's private data) in a very public way while simultaneously creating a very private (smoky) space for yourselfin public. The idea of shelter from hackers or the government--whomever you think is following you--is a smart way to tackle the privacy issues around our increasingly at-risk data.

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Clip on, Go out - Documenting 3 months in Africa

Clip on, Go out - Documenting 3 months in Africa | Wearable technologies in design research | Scoop.it

Some of the cool features include:
- A Wide-angle lens to capture more of your surroundings
- A desktop app which gives you access to all your images & means you can also easily make videos/GIFs using it
- The ability to control the capture level with the modes & simple (manual) sequence shots
- A mountable adaptor which means you can use the device with a bunch of third party accessories like bike mounts

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