Sharing Information literacy ideas
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Games used in teaching information literacy skills | Edwards & Hill

Games used in teaching information literacy skills | Edwards & Hill | Sharing Information literacy ideas | Scoop.it

The attached files are games and activities developed by Adam Edwards and Vanessa Hill to support teaching information literacy skills at Middlesex University. Some of the games will need laminating and cutting up for use in multiple sets. You can use these for your own teaching. We just ask that you tell us if you make new versions as we like to build on new ideas.


Via Richard A. Weir, joyrosario
Elizabeth Hutchinson's insight:

Everyone should know about these. I intend to use them in my lessons this week. 

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Sharing Information literacy ideas
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Citations and Citing Your Work Explained by Common Craft (VIDEO)

Citations and Citing Your Work Explained by Common Craft (VIDEO) | Sharing Information literacy ideas | Scoop.it
If you think about it, much of the information that goes into a paper or article can be organized into three groups: “common knowledge” “my ideas”, and “other people’s ideas”. By understanding these groups, we can see why citations matter in our work. 


Via Dennis T OConnor
Elizabeth Hutchinson's insight:
This is a great video but there is a cost to buy into access the resources. It is an American product which may not be useful to UK teachers. The video about citation is really well explained and if all the videos are as good as this it looks like it could be worth buying into. 
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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, January 17, 7:16 PM

Another excellent video from the great 'Explainers' at Common Craft.

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Perspective | This school librarian teaches students about (actual) fake news. Here’s how parents can, too.

Perspective | This school librarian teaches students about (actual) fake news. Here’s how parents can, too. | Sharing Information literacy ideas | Scoop.it
Recently, congressional committees summoned executives from Facebook, Twitter and Google to Capitol Hill to explain their company’s roles in the national security issue of fake news planted by the Russians to manipulate our last presidential election. Congress wants something done to protect U.S. citizens from fake news, and if the tech companies can’t come up with a technology solution fast enough, then they will step in and impose regulations.

Via Elizabeth E Charles
Elizabeth Hutchinson's insight:
Ask your school librarian to help! 
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Teachers Most Favourited Apps - Educators Technology

Teachers Most Favourited Apps - Educators Technology | Sharing Information literacy ideas | Scoop.it
Here is an updated version of our popular visual ‘Teachers' Favourite Apps’. This is a collection of some useful apps we curated based on your interaction and feedback regarding reviews we share here. The collection is especially useful for teachers new to the 'educational app culture' and are looking for some reliable recommendations to try out in class. We have arranged these apps into four main categories: apps for lesson planning, apps for fostering students creativity, apps for communicating with parents, and apps for creating digital quizzes.

Via John Evans
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Willem Kuypers's curator insight, January 9, 3:49 AM
Cette liste correspond bien à ce que j'utilise aussi. A retenir.
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This school librarian teaches students about (actual) fake news. Here's how parents can, too.

This school librarian teaches students about (actual) fake news. Here's how parents can, too. | Sharing Information literacy ideas | Scoop.it
"Here are techniques I teach to my students, easily adaptable for use at home."

Via Karen Bonanno
Elizabeth Hutchinson's insight:
Teaching our children to understand why evaluation of online resources is essential. Fake news only becomes a problem if we believe everything we read. 
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Teaching Current Events in the Age of Social Media - Edutopia

Teaching Current Events in the Age of Social Media - Edutopia | Sharing Information literacy ideas | Scoop.it

"With each click of the mouse or flip of the channel, our society is inundated with headlines focused on natural disasters, sexual harassment allegations, countries on the brink of war, and teen suicides. While none of this is anything new, the bombardment of these stories is unique to this generation of student. Social media, the 24-hour news cycle, and questionable media sources (or questionable reporting techniques) have become their own newsworthy headlines. As a result, life can appear dark, far darker than in pre–social media days.

As adults, we bring our prior knowledge of history and our optimism about humanity to help us process and filter this inundation. Our students, however, do not have hindsight to combat their feelings of helplessness. They are surrounded by unfiltered current events—a rapid fire of negativity that can leave them vulnerable and overly anxious. It’s no wonder that teen stress is on the rise.

Nevertheless, our students have to know about the world around them, and part of our job as educators is to prepare them for the realities of the world outside the classroom walls. It’s difficult, however, to walk this precarious high wire of responsibility knowing that we need to expose students to current events and yet still nurture them developmentally."


Via John Evans
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How to skillfully search and sift online to learn anything - YouTube by Ian OByrne 


Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Elizabeth Hutchinson's insight:
A great youtube video to help students sift through the information they find on Google. I will be using Google Keep more because of this. Really useful for any student about to embark on an extended essay or research task. 
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5 Google Search Tips - Teacher Tech

5 Google Search Tips - Teacher Tech | Sharing Information literacy ideas | Scoop.it
Try these 5 Google Search tips to up your game when using a Google Search. Turn on tools, use your voice, and use the Advanced Search builder.

Via Elizabeth E Charles
Elizabeth Hutchinson's insight:
Always good to have a reminder of how to search Google effectually. Don't just type in the question and hope for the best. Think about it first! 
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Elizabeth Hutchinson's curator insight, November 29, 2017 1:22 AM
It is always good to have a reminder of how you can search Google more effectively. Don't just type in your question, think about what you need first. 
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Pause Before Downloading: Rules and Resources for Reusing Digital Content in the Classroom

Pause Before Downloading: Rules and Resources for Reusing Digital Content in the Classroom | Sharing Information literacy ideas | Scoop.it
“Why can’t I use this picture?” This is a question my students often ask whenever they are looking for images on the Internet for projects they create in

Via Bookmarking Librarian
Elizabeth Hutchinson's insight:
Just because it is there does not mean you can take it. 'Educational purposes' does not mean you do not have to teach copyright! 
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, November 21, 2017 4:46 PM
This is ann informative read.
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How to Help Students Ask Better Questions by Creating a Culture of Inquiry

How to Help Students Ask Better Questions by Creating a Culture of Inquiry | Sharing Information literacy ideas | Scoop.it

"Student inquiry is at the heart of student choice. When students are able to ask their own questions, they can chase their curiosity and tap into their own interests. They can build on their prior knowledge and build a bridge to new information that they are analyzing. But how do we actually do this?

"Students Should Chase Their Curiosity

I want classrooms to be bastions of creativity and wonder. I want to see students chasing their curiosity and researching answers. I love what happens when students solve problems that don’t have easy answers; when they become builders and engineers and authors and scientists and historians bent on finding out the truth. And yet, this doesn’t always happen in school. Often, we stick too tightly to curriculum maps and deadlines and students learn to value compliance above empowerment. And the result is a lack of natural curiosity.

"How to Help Students Ask Better Questions

We want to see kids asking tons of questions. This is how students grow into creative, critical thinkers. In an inquiry-based framework, it all begins with student questions. But how do we actually make that happen? The answer lies in a culture of inquiry. This includes everything from the trust that teachers develop to the way they reduce fear to the lessons they develop to the strategies they use."


Via Jim Lerman, Dennis T OConnor
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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, November 12, 2017 9:44 PM

Information fluency is a critical thinking skill.

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Teach students to curate a project

Teach students to curate a project | Sharing Information literacy ideas | Scoop.it
With so much information available, it’s imperative that students develop the skills to effectively find and evaluate sources of information, categorize what they have found and create new meaning from those materials.

Via Nancy White
Elizabeth Hutchinson's insight:
Content curation is a skill. Setting a limit on what students can use makes them focus on why each resource is important. 
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Nancy White's curator insight, October 9, 2017 6:54 PM
I absolutely love the mixtape analogy!  Also, curating primary sources is a great way to connect with learner's curiosity and passions -great resource and ideas! 
Presenters's curator insight, November 11, 2017 2:27 PM
"Con tanta información disponible, es imperativo que los estudiantes desarrollen las habilidades para encontrar y evaluar de forma efectiva las fuentes de información, categorizar lo que han encontrado y crear nuevos significados para esos materiales añadiendo sus propias reseñas o hallazgos". Esta es posiblemente la mejor explicación de la utilidad de la curación de contenidos. Junto a ella, una lista de herramientas para llevarla a cabo: http://www.curata.com/blog/content-curation-tools-the-ultimate-list/
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Mystery Skype: Inject Some Excitement Into Your Book Club!

Mystery Skype: Inject Some Excitement Into Your Book Club! | Sharing Information literacy ideas | Scoop.it

Via Bookmarking Librarian
Elizabeth Hutchinson's insight:
Love the ideas of using this for book clubs. We have used it within lessons for a little while. Not thought about using it for smaller groups but a good idea. 
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Myths vs Reality - Copyright

Myths vs Reality - Copyright | Sharing Information literacy ideas | Scoop.it
The Copyright Myth-Reality Cards were produced for the launch of the Copyright User website at the AHRC’s Creative Economy Showcase event on 12 March 2014. 
Using the same data collected during the FAQs exercise and similar qualitative techniques, we identified the 8 copyright misconceptions that occurred most often among users and distilled them into a set of cards. 

Via Elizabeth E Charles
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Oskar Almazan's curator insight, November 11, 2017 1:22 PM
The Copyright Myth-Reality Cards were produced for the launch of the Copyright User website at the AHRC’s Creative Economy Showcase event on 12 March 2014. Using the same data collected during the FAQs exercise and similar qualitative techniques, we identified the 8 copyright misconceptions that occurred most often among users and distilled them into a set of cards. The cards consist of text and illustrations, with a copyright myth on one side and the copyright reality on the other. You can freely download and print the entire set of cards here.
 
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Top reasons to use databases

Top reasons to use databases | Sharing Information literacy ideas | Scoop.it
Top reasons to use databases | Piktochart Visual Editor

Via Bookmarking Librarian
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The Ultimate Guide to Information Literacy: How to Spot Fake News in 2018 -

The Ultimate Guide to Information Literacy: How to Spot Fake News in 2018 - | Sharing Information literacy ideas | Scoop.it
Back in the days when fake news was screaming about aliens visiting our planet or people coming back from death, it was easy to avoid publishers with rubbish information. Nowadays, an increased access to communication and media has led to the flood of false or useless information. As a result, even those people who want to avoid all this mess are not successful in spotting fraud.

Via Elizabeth E Charles
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Why children should be taught to build a positive online presence

Why children should be taught to build a positive online presence | Sharing Information literacy ideas | Scoop.it
When it comes to online spaces, children are usually taught about cyber safety and keeping information private, but curating a positive digital footprint could actually benefit them later in life.

Via Bookmarking Librarian
Elizabeth Hutchinson's insight:
Your school librarian can support this. Just ask them! 
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Oskar Almazan's curator insight, January 13, 10:18 AM
Rather than just teaching children about internet safety and reducing their digital footprint, we should also encourage them to curate a positive digital footprint which will be an asset for them in their future. Today’s children are prolific users of the internet. Concern has been raised about the future impact of the digital footprints they are generating. While much discussion of this issue focuses on keeping children safe, little is known about how children manage their digital footprints.
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Why Do Our Brains Love Fake News? - YouTube


Via Pippa Davies @PippaDavies
Elizabeth Hutchinson's insight:
I like this Youtube video on Fake News. It does have an American slant to it but it explains really well why we don't always question fake new. A great video to use for older students 14+
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Pippa Davies @PippaDavies 's curator insight, January 5, 8:12 PM

Youtube video on Fake News by Mindshift.

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Creating an Information Literacy Workshop for High School Girls - InfoSpace

Creating an Information Literacy Workshop for High School Girls - InfoSpace | Sharing Information literacy ideas | Scoop.it
Back in September we were approached by iSchool Professor Rachel Ivy Clarke and Director of the B.S. in Information Management and Technology program director Deb Nosky with a challenge:

How do you teach information and data literacy to a group of high school girls interested in STEM fields?

… by making it fun, of course!

Given the idea to create an escape room by Deb, five of us library science students banded together (myself, Kara Conley, Kayla Del Biondo, Kim Hoffman, and Nicole Potter) to develop an It Girls workshop that addressed three main areas: information literacy and identifying fake resources, smart searching, and data literacy.

What transpired was a truly memorable experience for a group of LIS students with limited prior knowledge on instruction.

Via Elizabeth E Charles
Elizabeth Hutchinson's insight:
A great blog post demonstrating the difference a programme can make to students. 
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Different Approaches To Using Student Blogs And Digital Portfolios

Different Approaches To Using Student Blogs And Digital Portfolios | Sharing Information literacy ideas | Scoop.it
Don’t let fear or indecision around student blogs freeze you into inaction. Worrying too much about whether you’re ‘doing it right’ can lead to not doing it at all.  At any level, student blogs provide benefits. Embrace them.

Via Nik Peachey, Vladimir Kukharenko, Peter Mellow, Dennis Swender
Elizabeth Hutchinson's insight:
Blogging is such a useful tool for critical thinking. Every child should have the opportunity to do this. 
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Ines Bieler's curator insight, November 9, 2017 10:49 AM

Some useful tips and advice.

Willem Kuypers's curator insight, November 11, 2017 3:50 AM
Une approche intéressante pour les portfolios au cours.
Viviana Echeverry's curator insight, November 13, 2017 11:22 PM
At this time, blogging assists students to become more ICT literate which is a crucial 21st century skill. Through blogging, we’re able to incidentally discuss many ICT skills such as keyboard shortcuts, Creative Commons, researching online and troubleshooting. Creating a class blog requires teamwork and collaboration. Students and teachers learn and share together. A real sense of classroom community can be developed through blogging and establishing a class identity Also, with this we can create an authentic audience, In the traditional classroom, the only audience of student work was the teacher and sometimes classmates and parents. Blogs provide a much larger audience for student work and an opportunity for feedback and self-improvement through commenting. I have found that students really take pride in the work that goes on the blog and want to do their best for their impending audience. In fact, is important to take into a consideration that the use of a blog increased motivation for writing, all students are happy to write and complete aspects of the post topic. Many will add to it in their own time. As well, improved the reading skill. Blogging is a great technique to introduce the technology into the classroom. Additionally, there are so many online tools out there which have more assessment when you can implant them in a blog. Blogging can provide a really different learning stage and while it takes a lot of work.
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FAQs About Copyright and Blogging

FAQs About Copyright and Blogging | Sharing Information literacy ideas | Scoop.it
My post on Monday about plagiarism kicked off a wave of comments and questions. To address some of those questions I published this list of resources for teaching and learning about copyright. Then yesterday afternoon I went live on my YouTube channel to address some questions too.

Via Elizabeth E Charles
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How to Ask Better Questions to Maximize Student Learning

How to Ask Better Questions to Maximize Student Learning | Sharing Information literacy ideas | Scoop.it
Response: Ways to Use Questions Effectively in the Classroom
By Larry Ferlazzo Nov. 18, 2017
(This is the first post in a five-part series)

The new "question-of-the-week" is:

How can teachers use questions most effectively in the classroom?

Via Dennis T OConnor
Elizabeth Hutchinson's insight:
Have just added this to my PD to listen to list. 
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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, November 27, 2017 1:57 PM

Facilitating an online forum involves a deep understanding of questioning. This is the first of 5 podcast episodes hosted by Larry Ferlazzo.  Fine work! 

Rescooped by Elizabeth Hutchinson from Edtech PK-12
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Teaching Students to Legally Use Images Online

Teaching Students to Legally Use Images Online | Sharing Information literacy ideas | Scoop.it
As our students use more and more images to enhance their digital products, they need to learn how to respect other people's creative ideas and privacy.

Via Cindy Rudy
Elizabeth Hutchinson's insight:
I like this, just because you are using it for a school project does not mean that you should not have to consider copyright. Let's teach them the right way! 
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Visual literacy – questions to ask your students

Visual literacy – questions to ask your students | Sharing Information literacy ideas | Scoop.it
This guide, published by UK organisation MESH, poses several pedagogical questions teachers could ask to develop their students’ visual literacy skills.

Via Josephine Laretive
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10 Ways to Teach Argument-Writing With The New York Times

10 Ways to Teach Argument-Writing With The New York Times | Sharing Information literacy ideas | Scoop.it

Free webinar with Nicholas Kristof on Oct. 10. Will be archived after the live session.

 

"How can writing change people’s understanding of the world? How can it influence public opinion? How can it lead to meaningful action?

In this post, which accompanies our Oct. 10 webinar, Write to Change the World: Crafting Persuasive Pieces With Help from Nicholas Kristof and the Times Op-Ed Page, we round up the best pieces we’ve published over the years about how to use the riches of The Times’s Opinion section to teach and learn.

We’ve sorted the ideas — many of them from teachers — into two sections. The first helps students do close-readings of editorials and Op-Eds, as well as Times Op-Docs, Op-Art and editorial cartoons. The second suggests ways for students to discover their own voices on the issues they care about. We believe they, too, can “write to change the world.”

Join our webinar (live on Oct. 10 or on-demand after) to learn more, and let us know in the comments how you teach these important skills."


Via Jim Lerman, Mary Reilley Clark
Elizabeth Hutchinson's insight:
Very useful! 
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Mary Reilley Clark's curator insight, October 6, 2017 1:31 PM

There's so much here for teachers to explore! 

Rescooped by Elizabeth Hutchinson from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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48 Critical Thinking Questions For Any Content Area - via TeachThought

48 Critical Thinking Questions For Any Content Area - via TeachThought | Sharing Information literacy ideas | Scoop.it
48 Critical Thinking Questions For Any Content Area by Ashley McCann  Critical thinking is the heart and soul of learning, and–in our estimation anyway–ultimately more important than any one specific content area or subject matter. It’s also an over-used and rather nebulous phrase — how do you teach someone to think? Of course that’s the purpose …

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Elizabeth Hutchinson's insight:
Lovely infograph at the bottom of the page. 
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Fiona Leigh's curator insight, September 28, 2017 4:44 PM
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Ana Alonso's curator insight, September 29, 2017 4:53 AM
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Valeria Ríos Bedoya's curator insight, October 7, 2017 3:34 PM
Even though this article may seem to contain very basic foundations of critical thiking, it provides us with explanations and steps for developing critical thinking skills from a learner perspective in the sense that it illustrates very well the ways in which this can be implemented. From a teacher perspective it also provides us with very useful and adjustable questions in oder to promote the development of HOTS in any type of task, with any type of topic. 
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Teaching Google Scholar: A Practical Guide For Librarians Free Download

Teaching Google Scholar: A Practical Guide For Librarians Free Download | Sharing Information literacy ideas | Scoop.it
Teaching Google Scholar in your library instructional sessions can increase students' information and digital literacy skills. Students' familiarity with Google Scholar's interface works to the instructor's advantage and allows more time to address students' information needs and teach foundational information literacy skills and less time teaching a new database with a less-intuitive database interface. Teaching Google Scholar: A Practical Guide for Librarians will illustrate instructional methods and incorporate step-by-step guides and examples for teaching Google Scholar. It begins with providing you with essential background:What Google Scholar isHow to set up Google Scholar using OpenURLHow to design Google Scholar instructional sessionsHow to incorporate active learning activities using Google ScholarAfter reading it, you will be ready to teach students critical skills including how to:Use specific Google Scholar search operatorsIncorporate search logicExtract citation data, generate citations, and save citations to Google's My Library and/or a citation management programUse Google Scholar tools- including 'cited by,' 'alerts,' 'library links,' and 'library search'Google Scholar is a powerful research tool and will only become more popular in the coming years. Learning how to properly teach students how to utilize this search engine in their research will greatly benefit them in their college career and help promote life-long learning. Google Scholar instruction is a must in today's modern information literacy classroom.

Via Elizabeth E Charles
Elizabeth Hutchinson's insight:
Looks like a useful tool
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