Sharia Law Dealing With Women's Rights
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Sharia Law Dealing With Women's Rights
Fall Research Project 2011, Susan Lester
Curated by Cynda Tate
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Women in Islam - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Women in Islam - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia | Sharia Law Dealing With Women's Rights | Scoop.it

The study of women in Islam investigates the role of women within the religion of Islam.[1] The complex relationship between women and Islam is defined by both Islamic texts and the history and culture of the Muslim world.[2] The Qur'an states both that men and women are equal,[3][4][5] but also, as in 4:34, that "Men are the protectors and maintainers of women, because Allah has made one of them to excel the other, and because they spend from their means. Therefore the righteous women are devoutly obedient and guard in the husband's absence what Allah orders them to guard." Although the Quran does say this, the superiority of men is interpreted in terms of strength by the context - men maintain women.[6]

Sharia (Islamic law) provides for complementarianism,[7] differences between women's and men's roles, rights, and obligations. However neither the Quran nor Hadith mention women have to be housewives.[8][9][10] Majority Muslim countries give women varying degrees of rights with regards to marriage, divorce, civil rights, legal status, dress code, and education based on different interpretations. Scholars and other commentators vary as to whether they are just and whether they are a correct interpretation of religious imperatives.

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Sharia Law and Women’s Rights in Iraq

Sharia Law and Women’s Rights in Iraq | Sharia Law Dealing With Women's Rights | Scoop.it
Articles about Assyrians, christians in Iraq with sidenotes on the origin and history of Christian Minorities in Iraq from past to present.
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Measuring Gender Role Identity and Awareness among Women Toward Their Right in Family

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This research is designed to examine awareness of women towards their right at household. The study highlights that patriarchal norms has an influence on women's attitudes concerning their privilege rights and responsibilities. Women's gender ideology appears to be constrained by patriarchal ideology that give priority to the masculine over the feminine in almost all environments such as school, household, labor market and community. Due to patriarchal belief, women tend to have lack awareness about their own rights. 

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Women's Rights

Gale Opposing Viewpoints In Context...

Throughout history, cultures typically assigned different roles to men and to women. In the past women were often subject to male authority, enjoying fewer rights and freedoms than men. This changed over time, however, as women demanded and achieved greater social and legal equality.

The movement for women’s rights that began in Western Europe and North America has affected many parts of the world. In a large number of countries, women have gained the right to vote, own property, and choose whether they will work outside the home. However, women in many areas still face disadvantages, such as lower pay for work of equal value, domestic violence, and laws that restrict their activities.

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Pakistan: Coalition Aims to End 'Honor' Killings

http://sks.sirs.com/cgi-bin/hst-article-display?id=SSCHEH-0-5408&artno=0000286343&type=ART&shfilter=U&key=women%27s+rights%2C+Pakistan&title=Pakistan%3A+Coalition+Aims+to+End+%27Honor%27+Killings&res=Y&ren=Y&gov=Y&lnk=Y&ic=N 

 

PESHAWAR, Pakistan, Oct. 6, 2008 (IPS/GIN)--A campaign against "honor" killings in Pakistan has support from lawmakers and lawyers pressing for modifications of Islamic law to prevent perpetrators from evading justice.

Non-governmental organizations leading the fight take a principled stand against the death penalty under any circumstances. Some lawmakers and lawyers who support them in the struggle against "honor" killings may not be active opponents of capital punishment, but they do not back Pakistan’s death penalty for consensual sex outside marriage.

The non-governmental organizations, lawmakers and lawyers have joined forces over the alleged killings of five women in Balochistan, a region known for its highly conservative and patriarchal traditions.

 

 

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A Killing Set Honor Above Love

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 OKAN, Iraq--Serving small glasses of sugary tea, Qadir Abdul-Rahman Ahmed explained how things went bad with the neighbors. It was not true, he said, that his brothers had threatened to drown his niece if she tried to marry the young man down the street.

"We are not against humanity," he explained. "I told my brother, if she wants to marry, you can't stop her."

But the couple should never have married without permission.

"The girl and the boy should be killed," he said. "It's about honor. Honor is more important for us than religion."

Honor killing has a long history in Iraq and here in the semiautonomous region of Kurdistan. But even here, this couple's case stood out because the man was killed, not the woman, and because of the political clout of the warring families.

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Women, Islam, and the New Iraq

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ARTICLE 14 OF Iraq's new constitution, approved in a nationwide referendum held on October 15, states that Iraqis are equal before the law" without discrimination because of sex." Yet the constitution also states that no law can be passed that contradicts the "established rulings" of Islam. For this reason, the new document has been condemned by critics both inside and outside Iraq as a fundamental setback for a majority of Iraq's population--namely, its women. According to Isam al-Khafaji, an Iraqi scholar, the document "could easily deprive women of their rights." Yanar Muhammad, a leading secular activist and the head of the Organization of Women's Freedom in Iraq, worries that the Islamic provision will turn the country "into an Afghanistan under the Taliban, where oppression and discrimination of women is institutionalized."

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Women & Sharia Law in the UK

Women & Sharia Law in the UK | Sharia Law Dealing With Women's Rights | Scoop.it

Reid Smith seeks to enlighten us on the question of Sharia law. But curiously he omits one of the central tenets of Sharia law - that the word of a woman is half that of a man.

Yet Smith is correct to say that we might be surprised by the number of countries which use Sharia law. Which brings me to the United Kingdom. As of 2010, there were just under 2.9 million Muslims in the U.K. comprising 4.6% of that country's population. In less than a decade, Britain's Muslim population has increased by nearly 75%.

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Women's Rights

Women's Rights | Sharia Law Dealing With Women's Rights | Scoop.it

"Global Issues in Context"

 

The fight for women's legal rights gained ground in the 19th century in western Europe, the United States, and Canada, and in many other areas of the world. Historically, while matriarchal societies had existed in some areas, such as southeast China (the Mosuo) and in South Bougainville near New Guinea and Australia (the Navogisi), patriarchal societies dominated most of the world and continue into the 21st century to be the predominate social structure worldwide. Women have, historically, held less economic and political power compared to men.

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The 2011 Global Women's Progress Report

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JUST OVER A decade into the 21st century, women's progress can be seen--and celebrated--across a range of fields. They hold the highest political offices from Thailand to Brazil, Costa Rica to Australia. A woman holds the top spot at the International Monetary Fund; another won the Nobel Prize in economics. Self-made billionaires in Beijing, tech innovators in Silicon Valley, pioneering justices in Ghana--in these and countless other areas, women are leaving their mark.
But hold the applause. In Saudi Arabia, women aren't allowed to drive. In Pakistan, a thousand women die in honor killings every year. And in Somalia, 95 percent of women are subjected to genital mutilation. In the developed world, women lag behind men in pay and political power. The poverty rate among women in the U.S. rose to 14.5 percent last year, the highest in 17 years.

 

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Pakistani Wives Left in Lurch

http://sks.sirs.com/cgi-bin/hst-article-display?id=SSCHEH-0-3230&artno=0000301878&type=ART&shfilter=U&key=Women%27s+rights%2C+Pakistan&title=Pakistani+Wives+Left+in+Lurch&res=Y&ren=Y&gov=Y&lnk=Y&ic=N 

 

They have little say in a divorce--whether to fight one, get one, or keep their children.

KARACHI, PAKISTAN--Zahida Ilyas looks every inch the demure Muslim woman, dressed from head to toe in black, her face ringed by a head scarf, the epitome of outward modesty.

Then her eyes flash and her jaw hardens as she recounts how she was beaten dozens of times, saw her husband take away their five young daughters, divorce her without telling her and leave her with nothing, least of all her dignity and confidence.

"He could kill me and no one would care," Ilyas, 32, said. "The police, courts, they're all on the men's side. No one listens to us."

With divorce and domestic violence on the rise in Pakistan, all too often women are dealt a doubly bad hand, family experts say. Women have little say when the man wants out, yet little way to leave if he's abusive and wants to keep her put.

 

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Iraq: War Turns Back the Clock for Women's Rights

http://sks.sirs.com/cgi-bin/hst-article-display?id=SSCHEH-0-9905&artno=0000317600&type=ART&shfilter=U&key=Women%27s+rights%2C+Iraq&title=Iraq%3A+War+Turns+Back+the+Clock+for+Women%27s+Rights&res=Y&ren=Y&gov=Y&lnk=Y&ic=N 

 

BAGHDAD, Sep. 13, 2011 (IPS/GIN) - When a middle-aged mother took a taxi alone from Baghdad to Nasiriyah, about 300 kilometres south earlier this year, her 20-year-old driver stopped on the way, pulled her to the side of the road and raped her. And that began a telling legal struggle.

"She is not a simple case," says Hanaa Edwar, head of the Iraqi rights-based Al-Amal Association, established in Baghdad after the U.S.-led invasion in 2003.

"She came from an affluent family, held a professional job, and told her family about the rape. They had the police arrest the driver," Edwar says. "Then she came to us for legal help. She said, 'I want my rights back, and what he has done to me, he will do to others. I want this perpetrator punished'."

The rape victim lost her case. "The judge had a male mentality. They think you should not make a scandal, but be silent. He prompted the accused with questions like, 'You did this when you were drunk - yes?' This is how they intimidate," Edwar said. "Now we are making an appeal."

 

 

 

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Iran's 7th-Century Justice

http://sks.sirs.com/cgi-bin/hst-article-display?id=SSCHEH-0-6939&artno=0000307937&type=ART&shfilter=U&key=women%27s%20rights%2C%20Iran&title=Iran%27s%207th%2DCentury%20Justice&res=Y&ren=Y&gov=Y&lnk=Y&ic=N 

 

The harrowing case of Sakineh Mohammadi Ashtiani -- a mother of two sentenced to stoning by an Iranian court for adultery -- has rightfully drawn attention to Iran's draconian penal code, which reserves its cruelest punishments for women. Even Tehran's new political ally, President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva of Brazil, has been roused into action, publicly offering Ms. Ashtiani asylum in his country.

Iran has yet to respond formally, and a foreign leader can have no direct bearing on a domestic legal proceeding. But the intervention -- a direct appeal to Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad -- demonstrates that the Islamic Republic's human rights record can't be divorced from its nuclear diplomacy.

Before the 1979 Islamic revolution, in the years when I worked as a judge in Iran, consensual sexual relations between adults did not figure in the country's criminal code. But the revolution enacted a version of Islamic law extraordinarily harsh even by the standards of the Muslim world. Under the new regime, extramarital sex was a crime punishable by law. The punishment for a single man or woman guilty of sex outside marriage became 100 lashes; under Article 86, the punishment for a married person became death by stoning.

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