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Session 2 - Approaches to Search-Based Applications using SharePoint, FAST and 3rd-Party tools

Session 2 - Approaches to Search-Based Applications using SharePoint, FAST and 3rd-Party tools | SharePoint & Information Architecture | Scoop.it
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Search based vs. predefined navigation, 2-0 » Storytella

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Stacey Hutt's comment, March 7, 2013 9:23 PM
Predefined navigation hierarchies are defined by people guessing how their visitors associate their content. It is impossible to define a hierarchy matching all your visitors. This leads to more guesses, more time for the visitor.

Predefined navigation distracts your visitors in two ways:

• It forces them to try to think like you do in order to find the page
• It diminishes the full value of the content they came for since it is squeezed in on the only spot left when all other spaces are taken up by navigation bars.

The perfect hierarchy is the one created by the user. The perfect content is the content where everything on the page is of value to the user. Everything including links to deeper understanding within the context.

Stop guessing and start helping your visitors find the answers to what they are looking for.
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10 features that will make your sharepoint search shine

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Stacey Hutt's comment, March 7, 2013 9:24 PM
"Search giants like Google and Bing provide powerful features that allow you to do great things with search. But, do you know about the possibilities available with SharePoint search? We’ve pulled together 10 ways to help you make your SharePoint search shine. You might be surprised at all of the exciting new features available with SharePoint search."
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Why Content Navigation Links Matter More Than Menus - UX Movement

Why Content Navigation Links Matter More Than Menus - UX Movement | SharePoint & Information Architecture | Scoop.it
Before you spend hours debating with your colleagues and clients on how your menus should look, there's something you should know. Users spend more time with content navigation links than they do with menus.
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Stacey Hutt's comment, March 7, 2013 9:23 PM
One of the reasons users use content navigation links more than menus is because they’re more engaging and can take users on a journey of content they’re interested in. As users view page content, they can click on any link they find interesting. This takes them to another page of content with links they can click that leads to another page of content with more links and so forth. Before users know it, they will have consumed multiple pages of content through the clicking of content navigation links. That’s true engagement.

Menus don’t have this same effect. They’re a boring list of links on the sides of the page that users only use when they’re already familiar with the site and know exactly what they want. Menus are handy and your site should have one, but they can’t engage users on a level that content navigation links can. This is because menus don’t come with content. They’re ambiguous labels that have little meaning to users who visit your site for the first time. First-time visitors aren’t looking at your menus to navigate. They’re looking at your content to navigate, which is why you should focus more of your energy on designing your landing pages than your menus. The landing page is where the user’s journey begins. It’s the starting page for an area of your site that includes attractive headlines, images and text to entice users to click-through to learn more.

Most designers obsess over the details of their menus because they assume that most users will use the menus to navigate. However, the truth is that most users will use content navigation links to navigate. While it’s important to have a usable menu, an engaging landing page matters more. If you aren’t seeing many page views on your site, you should worry less about your menus and focus more on improving your landing pages and content navigation links. That’s where users spend most of their time. And if you design that well, that’s where you’ll get a lot of your conversions.