Shaping the Future of Medical Technology
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Magnamosis, a New Magnetic Way to Connect Intestines, Proving Itself in Clinical Trial |

Magnamosis, a New Magnetic Way to Connect Intestines, Proving Itself in Clinical Trial | | Shaping the Future of Medical Technology | Scoop.it
An intestinal anastomosis is a fairly common surgical procedure usually done during intestinal resections, bypasses, diversions, etc. Typically stapling or suturing is performed to connect proximal and distant parts the intestine, but a new method that uses magnets shows a clinical promise. A new study just published in Journal of the American College of Surgeons assessed Magnamosis, a technique developed by Dr. Michael Harrison at University of California San Francisco that uses two circular magnets to create an anastomosis.
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Organs-on-Chip with Tiny Electrodes Sense Electrical Activity, Resistance of Cells |

Organs-on-Chip with Tiny Electrodes Sense Electrical Activity, Resistance of Cells | | Shaping the Future of Medical Technology | Scoop.it
Organ-on-chip technology promises to help speed up and improve research on how potential new drugs will interact with the body’s own organs. Additionally, it may alleviate the need for in-animal studies that can be difficult to perform and that too often produce misleading results.
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Fluorescing Bandage Senses Wound's Healing Process |

Fluorescing Bandage Senses Wound's Healing Process | | Shaping the Future of Medical Technology | Scoop.it

Bandages used to treat chronic wounds present a host of challenges, particularly when they’re removed to examine and clean a wound. While this is necessary, the process can be very painful for the patient, difficult on the clinician, and the wound may become infected due to being exposed. A team of researchers from Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (Empa), ETH Zurich, Centre Suisse d’Electronique et de Microtechnique (CSEM), and University Hospital Zurich set out to create an electronic bandage that can give a glimpse of what’s happening underneath it.

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Pulmonary Thrombosis-on-a-Chip Developed

Pulmonary Thrombosis-on-a-Chip Developed | Shaping the Future of Medical Technology | Scoop.it
A new study conducted by members of the Wyss Institute at Harvard University, Emulate Inc., and Janssen Pharmaceutical Research and Development, published this week in the journal Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, is the first to successfully recreate a human pulmonary thrombosis within an organ-level model of the lung in vitro.
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Kidney’s filtration barrier engineered from stem cells

Kidney’s filtration barrier engineered from stem cells | Shaping the Future of Medical Technology | Scoop.it
A glomerulus-on-a-chip lined by human stem cell-derived kidney cells could help model patient-specific kidney diseases and guide therapeutic discovery
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Silicon Nanowire Array Can Measure Electrical Responses in Neurons |

Silicon Nanowire Array Can Measure Electrical Responses in Neurons | | Shaping the Future of Medical Technology | Scoop.it
Researchers at the University of California San Diego have developed a silicon nanowire array that can sensitively measure the electrical activity of neurons. It is hoped that the device could be used to screen drugs for neurological diseases, as it could measure the response of neurons to different drugs.
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World's Smallest Jet Engine to Power Tiny Medical Devices |

World's Smallest Jet Engine to Power Tiny Medical Devices | | Shaping the Future of Medical Technology | Scoop.it
Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems in Stuttgart, Germany and Harbin Institute of Technology in Shenzhen, China have come up with a tiny self-powered propulsion system for devices small enough to move through various vessels inside our bodies.
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Artificial Stem Cells Promote Tissue Healing Minus Side Effects |

Artificial Stem Cells Promote Tissue Healing Minus Side Effects | | Shaping the Future of Medical Technology | Scoop.it
A collaboration between researchers at North Carolina State University, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University have apparently created a synthetic mimic of cardiac stem cells. These may end up being used instead of natural stem cells while reducing or eliminating side effects that may arise from stem cell therapy.
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Scientists Built Blood-Brain Barrier On-a-Chip to Help Develop Neuro Drugs, Understand Brain Diseases |

Scientists Built Blood-Brain Barrier On-a-Chip to Help Develop Neuro Drugs, Understand Brain Diseases | | Shaping the Future of Medical Technology | Scoop.it
At Vanderbilt University researchers have developed a mimic of the blood-brain barrier in the form of a microfluidic device. To show a proof-of-concept of
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Patching a gap in wound care

Ingber and Fernandez [of the Wyss Institute] have unveiled a new study in the journal Tissue Engineering that demonstrates biodegradable chitosan bioplastics can be used to bond bodily tissues to repair wounds or even to hold implanted medical devices in place.

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Scientists Use 3D Printers to Recreate Kidney's Proximal Tubules |

Scientists Use 3D Printers to Recreate Kidney's Proximal Tubules | | Shaping the Future of Medical Technology | Scoop.it
At Harvard’s Wyss Institute researchers used a 3D printer to essentially recreate the proximal tubules found within kidneys, potentially opening up the possibility of printing complex structures that can be used to replace diseased tissues and organs.
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Automation & Microfluidics - The Online Scientific Community - News

Automation & Microfluidics - The Online Scientific Community - News | Shaping the Future of Medical Technology | Scoop.it

What if researchers could predict the impacts of potentially harmful chemicals, viruses or drugs on human beings without resorting to animal or even human test subjects?

To help achieve that, a team of scientists and engineers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is developing a “human-on-a-chip,” a miniature external replication of the human body, integrating biology and engineering with a combination of microfluidics and multi-electrode arrays.

Monika McDole-Russell's insight:
This is very exciting news! One step closer to a functioning, scalable human-on-a-chip.
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Researchers Develop Dissolvable Electronic Brain Implants |

Researchers Develop Dissolvable Electronic Brain Implants | | Shaping the Future of Medical Technology | Scoop.it

Researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at University of Pennsylvania and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have reported in journal Nature Materials on a new type of intracranial electrodes that are able to dissolve and wash out of the body once done doing their job.

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Growing and Testing Drugs on Dozens of Tiny Guts at Once |

Growing and Testing Drugs on Dozens of Tiny Guts at Once | | Shaping the Future of Medical Technology | Scoop.it
In a demonstration of where the field of organ-on-a-chip technology is inevitably going, MIMETAS, a company developing organ-on-chip technology out of Leiden, The Netherlands, and Roche, the giant pharmaceutical company, teamed up to grow and test 350 perfused gut tubes within a matter of days. The gut tubes replicate the basic structure of an intestine and should help to study how drugs and other compounds affect them.
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Dangerous cell detachment decoded

A team of scientists at the Wyss Institute at Harvard University and Boston University has created a 3D blood-vessel-on-a-chip model to investigate endothelial barrier failure, and found that inflammation disrupts the connections between endothelial cells and mural cells, causing the mural cells to retract or even detach from their usual position surrounding blood vessels and leading to further leakage.
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Wyss Institute’s Organ Chips get smart and go electric

Organs-on-Chips (Organ Chips) are emerging as powerful tools that allow researchers to study the physiology of human organs and tissues in ways not possible before. By mimicking normal blood flow, the mechanical microenvironment, and how different tissues physically interface with one another in living organs, they offer a more systematic approach to testing drugs than other in vitro methods that ultimately could help to replace animal testing.
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3-D Printed Ovaries Produce Healthy Offspring

3-D Printed Ovaries Produce Healthy Offspring | Shaping the Future of Medical Technology | Scoop.it
The brave new world of 3-D printed organs now includes implanted ovary structures that, true to their design, actually ovulate, according to a study by Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and McCormick School of Engineering.
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EVATAR - A Female Reproductive Tract on a Chip

EVATAR - A Female Reproductive Tract on a Chip | Shaping the Future of Medical Technology | Scoop.it
Investigating the normal functioning of the female reproductive tract and associated diseases can present several challenges. It "is unique at many levels and although we have learned a tremendous amount using animal models, there are species differences in the anatomy and physiology of the reproductive tract. Studying the human reproductive tract is limited by obvious ethical concerns and thus what we know is based on studies that have been performed on human tissues that are otherwise discarded after surgery and pathology examination” explains Dr. J. Julie Kim, Susy Y. Hung Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Northwestern University.

Dr. Kim and a team of scientists from Northwestern University are hoping to overcome some of these challenges with the development of EVATAR, a 3D organ-on-a-chip model of the female reproductive tract, which can mimic a normal 28-day hormone cycle. Made up of an ovary, fallopian tube, uterus, cervix and liver, EVATAR provides a platform for studying the effects of drugs and learning more about diseases such as endometriosis and cervical cancer. It is hoped that the palm-sized model could help to advance women’s health and fertility.
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Paper Pumps Improve Microfluidic Device Portability

Paper Pumps Improve Microfluidic Device Portability | Shaping the Future of Medical Technology | Scoop.it

Biomedical engineering researchers from North Carolina State University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have developed inexpensive paper pumps that use capillary action to power portable microfluidic devices, opening the door to a range of biomedical tools. Microfluidic devices are devices that manipulate fluids which have a volume of one microliter or less – volumes substantially smaller than a single teardrop. These devices hold promise for use in applications ranging from biomedical diagnostic tools to drug testing technologies.

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Wyss Institute’s human gut-on-a-chip goes viral

Wyss Institute’s human gut-on-a-chip goes viral | Shaping the Future of Medical Technology | Scoop.it

A multidisciplinary team of tissue engineers and biologists at Harvard’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering working alongside scientists from the Molecular Virology Team at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)’s Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition now have leveraged the Wyss Institute’s previously developed human gut-on-a-chip to mimic the entry, host cell-interaction and multiplication of a pathogenic clinical strain of Coxsackievirus using gut epithelium outside the human body. Their findings are reported in PLoS One.

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Simple New Device for Capturing Circulating Tumor Cells Needs No Microfluidics |

Simple New Device for Capturing Circulating Tumor Cells Needs No Microfluidics | | Shaping the Future of Medical Technology | Scoop.it
Scientists at Worcester Polytechnic Institute are reporting in journal Nanotechnology on a new way of trapping circulating tumor cells that doesn’t rely on microfluidic techniques common in previously developed devices. Because it is arguably a simpler approach that relies more on simple mechanics, the device is cheap and works impressively well.
Monika McDole-Russell's insight:
Interesting device. As noted in this article, expense and complexity are two of the challenges of microfluidic development. I'm curious to see where this new technology goes.
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NCATS to Support Tissue Chip for Drug Screening Testing Centers

NCATS to Support Tissue Chip for Drug Screening Testing Centers | Shaping the Future of Medical Technology | Scoop.it

Over the past four years, NCATS and its Tissue Chip for Drug Screening program collaborators — the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (link is external) and the FDA — supported the development of human tissue chips that accurately model the structure and function of human organs, such as the lung, liver and heart, to help predict drug safety in humans more rapidly. NCATS-funded TCTC scientists will use a reference set of validation compounds vetted by pharmaceutical representatives through an NCATS partnership with the IQ Consortium (link is external) and the FDA, and will run tests to determine functionality, reproducibility, robustness and reliability in these organ platforms.

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First entirely 3D-printed organ-on-a-chip with integrated sensors

Researchers from the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University and the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have made the first entirely 3D-printed organ-on-a-chip with integrated sensing.  
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Gut model HuMiX works like the real thing

Gut model HuMiX works like the real thing | Shaping the Future of Medical Technology | Scoop.it
Scientists from the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB) of the University of Luxembourg in collaboration with colleagues at the Luxembourg Institute of Health and the University of Arizona in the United States have now proven that a model of the human gut they have developed and patented – HuMiX, the “Human Microbial Cross-talk” model – is representative of the actual conditions and processes that occur within our intestines.
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Topically applied curcumin nanoparticles alleviates joint pain and slows progression of Osteoarthritis

Topically applied curcumin nanoparticles alleviates joint pain and slows progression of Osteoarthritis | Shaping the Future of Medical Technology | Scoop.it
Researchers have shown, using a mouse model of osteoarthritis, that curcumin loaded nanoparticles topically applied to arthritic knees stopped the progression of the disease and eliminated associated pain by locally delivering curcumin to the fat pad associated with the knee cap. The study also demonstrated several osteoarthritis relevant inflammatory pathways were suppressed by curcumin, including those that result in the production of proteins that destroy cartilage.
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