Surviving Leadership Chaos
72.2K views | +3 today
Follow
Surviving Leadership Chaos
" We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give. " - Winston Churchill
Curated by donhornsby
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by donhornsby
Scoop.it!

Treat employees like adults, and you won't have leaks

Treat employees like adults, and you won't have leaks | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

With 1 billion user "endorsements" and counting, Jeff Weiner explains the secret behind LinkedIn's red-hot streak. (Hint: It has nothing to do with the 3,500 iPads he just gave employees.)

donhornsby's insight:

(From the article):  People have an insatiable curiosity, and if they're officially denied access to information, they're going to dig for it on their own. And if they find it, they'll become resentful and want to leak it. "That's when executive management says, well, clearly we can't trust our employees with this information. So, we're going to have to buckle down and release even less information." Employees become even more resentful, dig even deeper, and that, as Weiner explains, is when the witch hunt starts.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by donhornsby
Scoop.it!

Lincoln's lessons on leadership live on

Lincoln's lessons on leadership live on | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

As we celebrate Presidents Day, it is the perfect time to consider some of the leadership traits that made Abraham Lincoln one of the great presidents in American history. 

donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Lincoln was extremely "self aware," as Kearns Goodwin says, meaning he understood that he had the potential to have serious mood shifts. Like all leaders, he could get angry, but Lincoln had the uncanny ability to understand that the way he communicated his anger toward those around him was critical to his success. When Lincoln was particularly angry he had a habit of writing a letter to the person he was angry with and then setting it aside. When Lincoln did verbally communicate his anger, he would quickly try to resolve the situation, refusing to allow unresolved conflict to fester.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by donhornsby from Transformational Leadership
Scoop.it!

The Best Leaders Know Self Esteem is Scarce

The Best Leaders Know Self Esteem is Scarce | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Economics teaches us that if something is scarce, it is more valuable. And while self-esteem might be scarce in your workplace, it doesn’t have to be.


Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): See it Yourself.  When people’s self-esteem isn’t at healthy levels, it is in part because they don’t see themselves as capable or able to achieve at higher levels.   Before you can help them see something new in themselves, you must see it in them.

 

Help Them See It.  Let people know you believe in them.  Show them examples of success that they don’t see, are downplaying, or are denying.  Your belief can begin to be transferred to them when you help them see what you see.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by donhornsby
Scoop.it!

Washington's Lessons: It’s Never to Early to Choose to Lead

Washington's Lessons: It’s Never to Early to Choose to Lead | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

GREAT LEADERSHIP doesn’t just happen. Great leaders are revealed in extraordinary circumstances, but they are made long before. A person’s quality of leadership radiates from their character. Consequently, it’s never too early to begin your leadership development.

donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): It is the mindset of a leader to work on themselves harder than they work on others. A leader’s first responsibility is governing themselves. Historian Gordon Wood has written, “Washington became a great man and was acclaimed as a classical hero because of the way he conducted himself during times of temptation. It was his moral character that set him off from other men.” 

Leadership is embodied in the way you look at the world and respond to it. It’s never too early to choose to lead.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by donhornsby from MILE Leadership
Scoop.it!

3 Reasons to Treat Employees Like Family

3 Reasons to Treat Employees Like Family | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Applying some basic family principles to your employees can go a long way to improving loyalty and retention--especially during tough times.
When starting a business, your main objective usually involves turning a profit.

Via The People Development Network
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): We value our people above all else and find a family-based approach to recruiting, grooming, and maintaining a loyal team to be very successful.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by donhornsby from Business Improvement
Scoop.it!

11 Simple Concepts to Become a Better Leader

11 Simple Concepts to Become a Better Leader | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Being likeable will help you in your job, business, relationships, and life. I interviewed dozens of successful business leaders for my last book, to determine what made them so likeable and their companies so successful. All of the concepts are simple, and yet, perhaps in the name of revenues or the bottom line, we often lose sight of the simple things - things that not only make us human, but can actually help us become more successful. Below are the eleven most important principles to integrate to become a better leader:


Via Daniel Watson
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): The world is more complex than ever before, and yet what customers often respond to best is simplicity — in design, form, and function. Taking complex projects, challenges, and ideas and distilling them to their simplest components allows customers, staff, and other stakeholders to better understand and buy into your vision. We humans all crave simplicity, and so today's leader must be focused and deliver simplicity.

more...
Daniel Watson's curator insight, February 14, 2013 11:36 PM


As a business owner or business manager, whether you like it or not, you are occupying a position that requires you to effectively lead others to achieve required outcomes.


Leadership based on key principles, has been demonstrated to be an effective approach to gaining the support of followers, and then getting those followers to do what they need to do, to achieve results.


This excellent article, suggests that developing likeability is the first step on the path to becoming a better leader, and it outlines 11 important principles for business owners and managers to integrate into their leadership practices to become better leaders.

Claudia Crescenzi's curator insight, February 15, 2013 5:51 AM

Concetti semplici...ma mai banali

Gilles FOURNIER's curator insight, February 16, 2013 4:58 PM

 cc'est est simple mais tellement vrai

Rescooped by donhornsby from Leadership, Influence and Living with Impact
Scoop.it!

One Sure-Fire (and Fast) Way to Get Rid of Office Politics

One Sure-Fire (and Fast) Way to Get Rid of Office Politics | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Politics are the bane of company life. But eliminating them is a lot less complicated than you think. Here's how. (It is the working man who is the happy man. It is the idle man who is the miserable man.

Via Gary Morrison
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): If your company is riddled with politics, one way to change things is to get everyone a very great deal busier.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by donhornsby
Scoop.it!

How to Help Snails Keep Up

How to Help Snails Keep Up | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Who’s falling behind? Thriving organizations leave those who don’t grow behind. Change leaves those who don’t change frustrated, wondering what happened.

donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Placing people first builds foundations for tough conversations about performance later. Build relationships. Affirm people. Connect. Think how they think.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by donhornsby from Attraction.Resourcing.Retention
Scoop.it!

5 Ways to Generate Office Happiness

5 Ways to Generate Office Happiness | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Is your office feeling blah? Learn five ways to perk it up that may surprise you.

Via The Strategist Group
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Some days, the office is filled with excitement, but on others it feels as if you're dragging though sludge. No workplace should ever feel drab and dreary. With some forethought and action, you can easily perk up the environment.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by donhornsby
Scoop.it!

Rebooting Work: How to Make Work— Work for You

Rebooting Work: How to Make Work— Work for You | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Rebooting Work by Silicon Valley legend Maynard Webb and Carlye Adler is a sensible look at the changing nature of the workplace and how you can use emerging technologies to take charge of your career. To become a CEO of your own destiny.

donhornsby's insight:

(From the work): Technology is pushing flexibility in the workplace. Technology doesn’t replace the need for human contact but it can make work more efficient and face time more rewarding. It provides the opportunity to create how you do your work in new ways if you are willing to perform. Outcomes become more important than ever. If you give more you will receive more.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by donhornsby
Scoop.it!

Become the kind of leader...

Become the kind of leader... | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Become the kind of leader that people would follow voluntarily; even if you had no title or position.

 

—Brian Tracy

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by donhornsby
Scoop.it!

Pope Benedict XVI and the Leadership Issue No One Wants to Talk About

Pope Benedict XVI and the Leadership Issue No One Wants to Talk About | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
His resignation is a reminder of how physically and emotionally demanding effective leadership actually is.
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): And there's going to be debate now about the pope and how he's chosen. And we have to ask ourselves: Can we afford, in the broad sense, to give people a position for life when it appears that there is so much intensifying turbulence and change everywhere? We're talking about turbulence as the new normal and, really, whether any job or position can be granted for life within all that.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by donhornsby
Scoop.it!

Even Whiners Can Lead

Even Whiners Can Lead | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Whiners are potential leaders. But, pessimists can’t lead.

donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): The next time you hear yourself whining, take responsibility. Stop complaining about what others aren’t doing. Do something yourself.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by donhornsby from Life @ Work
Scoop.it!

Are Your Goals and Your Purpose the Same Thing?

Are Your Goals and Your Purpose the Same Thing? | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
There is no shortage of preachers when it comes to having goals. Self-help books and audio and video and live seminars abound with goal-setting and goal-achievement as a central tenet of their teaching.

Via Barb Jemmott
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Setting goals without knowing your purpose is a fruitless and unfulfilling business. Focusing on goals rather than purpose is epidemic in this world, and ignoring purpose altogether is quite common. So if goals stand in the way of the fulfillment of your purpose, they have to go, and they can go as they are not required.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by donhornsby from New Leadership
Scoop.it!

Listening – Its Importance to Leadership

Listening – Its Importance to Leadership | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Listening is an attitude, a mindset that dictates whether you are either self-centered or other-centered.


Via AlGonzalezinfo, Roger Francis
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): If you want to improve your listening skills, try this on for size. When another individual is speaking, wait two seconds after they have completed their sentence to make your observations.

more...
Kathleen Bartle's comment, February 20, 2013 7:03 PM
Yep, and stop thinking of a response. If you want to say something, as a clarifying question.
John Wade: pragmatic support for law firm leaders's comment, February 26, 2013 5:13 PM
Active listening. Try it. To hear is one thing; to listen, an entirely different thing. That and observation of verbal and body language tells you more than simply trying to get your view heard.
John Wade: pragmatic support for law firm leaders's curator insight, February 26, 2013 5:13 PM

Active listening. Try it. To hear is one thing; to listen, an entirely different thing. That and observation of verbal and body language tells you more than simply trying to get your view heard.

Rescooped by donhornsby from Leadership & Management
Scoop.it!

Why Great Leaders Make Bad Managers - and That's OK

Why Great Leaders Make Bad Managers - and That's OK | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Leadership and management are very different skills. Yet most of the time, we expect corporate executives to wow us with their detail-oriented approach to management and then suddenly metamorphose into visionary leaders the moment they’re promoted. It doesn’t usually work out, says Annmarie Neal, the author of the forthcoming Leading from the Edge (ASTD Press, 2013).

 

A leader is somebody who sees opportunity and puts change in motion. A manager is somebody who follows that leader and sees how to structure things to create value for the company,” she says. “I’ve found that the best leaders weren’t really good managers.


Via Bob Corlett, JLAndrianarisoa
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): In a study she conducted when she was a top executive at a Fortune 500 firm, she discovered that “people who were out of the box, pushing the edge, thinking in terms of the horizon…got lower [performance] ratings than the people who could show crazy execution on nonsense.” It’s a huge mistake – and a missed opportunity – for corporations, she says. You have to be able to evaluate managers and leaders on the criteria that matter most for each: “You’ve got to change that system. You can’t really want a system where you say, ‘I prefer you to drive nonsense…and that matters more than the person who puts their neck on the line.’”

more...
ManagingAmericans's comment, February 18, 2013 9:39 AM
Great insights Don. It is amazing to me how often we try and apply a preconceived box for a specific role and expect everyone to fit within that box.
Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, February 19, 2013 4:34 AM

Well, interesting... I agree in a very limited degree... or rather not... I don't think that the B-W picture (either/or) is the adequate approach... I believe in the right proportion... In real big organizations, where the action radius of the leader is really broad and if, additionally, the strategic situation is on a very high level volatile might be that the leader-proportion is approaching the 100% but normally I don't think that Mintzberg's thoughts about the leadership/management (worth to read some of his books) has been so much the past...

Scooped by donhornsby
Scoop.it!

Great Infographic on Happiness at Work | Innoventure

Great Infographic on Happiness at Work | Innoventure | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by donhornsby from "employee engagement enhancement"
Scoop.it!

Recognition and engagement - Interesting Infographics

Recognition and engagement - Interesting Infographics | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Recognition and engagement

Via Ali Godding, Jean-Philippe D'HALLUIN
more...
Ali Godding's curator insight, February 14, 2013 5:25 AM

87% of the $46billion spent on employee rewards in the US goes on unstructured programs detatched from both employee engagement and business success. Wow!   I am sure the UK is not much different either. 

Scooped by donhornsby
Scoop.it!

To-Do Lists Not Working? Try This Time-Management Alternative

To-Do Lists Not Working? Try This Time-Management Alternative | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Taking time to think about your ideal day can help you become much more productive and make your life more effective.
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Knowing what "ideal" means to you gives you a goal to work toward. Put your draft "ideal day" somewhere so you can see it, read about it, and ponder it, often. The life you are currently living is the result of accumulated thoughts, discussions, actions and experiences. If you want your life to be different, something must change. By writing what an "ideal" day might be for you the process of change begins. . . right here, right now. . . and you make your "best" even better.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by donhornsby from Leaders & Teams
Scoop.it!

Six Common Misperceptions about Teamwork

Six Common Misperceptions about Teamwork | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Teamwork and collaboration are critical to mission achievement in any organization that has to respond quickly to changing circumstances.

A number of mistaken beliefs about teamwork can sidetrack productive collaboration.


Via Karen Rockhold, Mary Perfitt-Nelson, David Hain, Jean-Philippe D'HALLUIN, Fabrice De Zanet
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article):The hands-on activities of group leaders do make a difference. But the most powerful thing a leader can do to foster effective collaboration is to create conditions that help members competently manage themselves. The second most powerful thing is to launch the team well. And then, third, is the hands-on teaching and coaching that leaders do after the work is underway. Our research suggests that condition-creating accounts for about 60% of the variation in how well a team eventually performs; that the quality of the team launch accounts for another 30%; and that real-time coaching accounts for only about 10%. Leaders are indeed important in collaborative work, but not in the ways we usually think.

more...
Mary Perfitt-Nelson's curator insight, February 5, 2013 6:40 AM

Teamwork is a frustrating as it is rewarding.  Here are a few insights about how to make the most out of collaboration.  

Rachelle Wooten's curator insight, February 5, 2013 10:07 AM

My favorite quote: "Conflict, when well managed and focused on a team's objectives, can generate more creative solutions than one sees in conflict-free groups."  All too often conflict is avoided maybe because it is poorly managed but if it's focused on team's goal or mission can be most beneficial.

Scooped by donhornsby
Scoop.it!

5 Reasons Leaders Fail

5 Reasons Leaders Fail | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
There's a fine line between successful and failed leadership. These five dynamics will push you right over it.
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): As this list shows, leaders fail due to certain social-psychological blinders that inhibit their capacity to work in a context of open and candid teams. Leaders fail because they allow themselves to become narrow, while thinking that they are being broad and inclusive. Rather than being agile and reflective, leaders fail when they are overly focused and listen only to their own intentions.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by donhornsby
Scoop.it!

Daily Devotion: The Legacy of the Protestant Work Ethic

Daily Devotion: The Legacy of the Protestant Work Ethic | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
The Western world's obsession with work has a long history. But on what is it founded?

 

Are we too leisure oriented, or is our cyber world turning us into workaholics? Has technology brought lasting benefits to workers? Should employment cut so deeply into personal time and family life? These and other questions arise often and illustrate the controversy that surrounds what we do most: work. To understand why we face such issues today, it’s helpful to rehearse some recent history to uncover the roots of our modern concept of work.

donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): As secularism became an important aspect of American society alongside religion, it contributed to the nation’s growing pluralistic culture.

 

Today the tension is about which worldview should dominate public life. Humanists pursue the marginalization of religious values, while the religiously inclined, and particularly those with strong Calvinistic roots, believe all private and public activity should be governed by sacred values. Nevertheless, for most, the connection between work and a person’s calling has been severed. Work in today’s cultural setting is firmly attached to secular values.

more...
Doris Garcia's curator insight, July 28, 2015 3:55 PM

Good summary of how important figures in the history of Protestantism understood work from a theological perspective. The author shares some criticism and a valuable rule for employees and employers based on "love your neighbors as yourself." 

Ajarn Don P's curator insight, July 28, 2015 11:58 PM

I have been thinking on a topic "The meaning of work and employment for persons with disabilities: Challenges for rehabilitative counseling."  Moving from begging to productive life without relapse requires a redifining of work.  In this regard I look to the sense of calling (personal identity formation), income production and social inclusion as meaningful work.  I then consider the role of occupational rehab counselors working with persons with disabilities.

Scooped by donhornsby
Scoop.it!

How to Live a Meaningful Life

How to Live a Meaningful Life | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
It’s not the big adventures of life that make it the most meaningful, it’s the small moments that create a life filled with purpose and connection.
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Have you ever felt like you were treading water instead of splashing and playing and enjoying the moment?  Are you missing the small moments of life because you’re so focused on your next milestone?  I’ve missed a lot of the small stuff – too much.  Good news, if you’ve ever thought, “I want a more meaningful life,” it’s not too late.  Living, and meaning, are found between the milestones, not only when you reach your goal.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by donhornsby
Scoop.it!

The Next Pope Will Need a Good Head for Business

The Next Pope Will Need a Good Head for Business | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
The Vatican's problems call for shrewd financial management
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): While the pope isn’t expected to get involved in routine financial management, he must “bring in smart, able people to manage the Vatican’s finances” and get the Holy See placed on the so-called white list of fully transparent jurisdictions, says Stefano Maria Paci, a journalist who covers the Vatican for Italian channel Sky TG24. “This is of significant importance,” he says.

more...
No comment yet.