Surviving Leadership Chaos
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Surviving Leadership Chaos
" We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give. " - Winston Churchill
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I Am Your Employee: Employee Wants and Needs to Drive Engagement

I Am Your Employee: Employee Wants and Needs to Drive Engagement | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

How well do you know your employees? Here are some insights to what employees really want to become engaged and motivated in the workplace.

 
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If employees could collectively tell you what they want and need, here’s what they might say: “I am your employee...
 
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Why Building Relationships with Your Employees Is Better Than Just Managing Them

Why Building Relationships with Your Employees Is Better Than Just Managing Them | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
By creating strong relationships with your staff members, you'll build a better workforce and develop bonds that will help you and your business be a success.
donhornsby's insight:
Relationships should always be reciprocal. Unfortunately, they’ve become too much about getting without giving. Real relationships can’t be about something that exists for our own benefit or getting a return on an agreement to work together in any capacity, be it a mentorship or a contractual agreement. They’re about perpetuating the momentum that each person brings to the relationship. 

 The same must be true in leadership: It should never be one-sided, nor should the leader always be the one generating the ideas or making the decisions. Leadership means actively listening and advancing the ideas of others (and injecting recommendations along the way to further strengthen or add value to them). If you’re the type of leader who needs all the attention, you won’t seek to cultivate wisdom in others.
 
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Five Signs Your Company Values You -- And Five Signs They Don't

Five Signs Your Company Values You  --  And Five Signs They Don't | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Here are five signs your company values you — and five signs they don't.

Via David Hain, Bobby Dillard
donhornsby's insight:
Your company doesn't value you if they tell you they do but when you ask for something — a stapler or a half-day off work — it's viewed as a major inconvenience.
 
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David Hain's curator insight, March 13, 2017 5:37 AM

How valued do you feel? Maybe you should ask yourself these questions...?

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Purpose or Engagement? Is One Better Than the Other?

Purpose or Engagement? Is One Better Than the Other? | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Purpose and engagement are important aspects in the workforce. But is one better than the other? Find out.

Via Anne Leong
donhornsby's insight:
If you want to improve your employee engagement, start by defining your company’s purpose—better engagement will likely follow.
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Jerry Busone's curator insight, December 1, 2016 7:44 AM

Simply purpose drives engagement ... as a lender check in our your folks and give them a strong sense of purpose ...answer the "Why" for them and watch them engage and perform 

Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, December 1, 2016 4:56 PM
Without purpose, can we have engagement? Engage comes from a word meaning commitment. Teachers and students who find purpose and meaning will engage and commit.
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What to Do When People Don’t Support Your Next Career Move

What to Do When People Don’t Support Your Next Career Move | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

You’ve weighed the pros and cons and carefully assessed the impact. After in-depth consideration, you’ve decided to accept that new job, or launch your own business, or take time off to be with your children. You know it’s the right choice — but your boss, friends, and colleagues aren’t convinced. What should you do when people you respect disagree with your decisions?

donhornsby's insight:
Another gem from Dorie Clark - 

It’d be ideal if everyone in your life supported all your decisions, but that’s unlikely to happen. Yet you’re far more likely to face occasional resistance from those who genuinely believe they have your best interests at heart. By taking the time to understand their motivations and concerns, showing them exactly how you’re mitigating risks, and making it clear how important this decision is to you, you’re likely to gain at least their respect — if not their support, too.
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Are You a True Leader, or Just a Boss?

Are You a True Leader, or Just a Boss? | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
These characteristics are what shape a great leader, according to the experts.
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"You'll know you're a good boss because you see it in your team's work and on their faces," she said. "The success is there."
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How to Manage Employees With Difficult Personalities

How to Manage Employees With Difficult Personalities | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Don't let a bad attitude bring down your organizational culture. Find out how to bring relief to the office by addressing these problem behaviors.
donhornsby's insight:
(From the article): Essentially, when it comes to difficult personalities in the workplace, the name of the game is communication. Take the time to understand where these behaviors are springing from and develop solutions around them. Doing so will not only earn you the respect of your workers, but it will also help you foster a positive work environment where everyone can feel comfortable.
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What Leaders Need To Do To Help Their Employees Succeed

What Leaders Need To Do To Help Their Employees Succeed | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Discover through two stories why purpose instead of passion is what's key to sustaining employee motivation and growth over the long term.
donhornsby's insight:
(From the article): Ultimately, there’s no question that passion is important as it is the spark that can fuel our drive for change and growth. But what’s most critical to our ability to bring out the best in those we lead and to support both their present and future successes is helping them to derive a sense of purpose in what they do. Of finding meaning and value in the contributions they make to help transform our shared purpose into today’s reality.
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Rewards and Recognition Done Right

Rewards and Recognition Done Right | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Rewards and recognition programs can be an important part of your organization’s incentive plan. However, if they are implemented wrong, they can backfire.
donhornsby's insight:
(From the article): Deliberate the delivery
How you deliver rewards and recognition to employees can stick the landing or crash the landing. Don’t kill the intent. You should think through the delivery with attention to detail. For example, sincerity is key; if it comes from the heart it sticks in the mind. Also remember that “Specificity is a must; general praise leads to a general malaise,” and “Timeliness is critical. Drift creates a rift.” Let R&R drift past the time a praise-worthy event occurred and you create a rift between receipt of the recognition and any potential for associated meaning.
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Dean J. Fusto's curator insight, March 4, 2016 3:18 PM
(From the article): Deliberate the delivery
 
How you deliver rewards and recognition to employees can stick the landing or crash the landing. Don’t kill the intent. You should think through the delivery with attention to detail. For example, sincerity is key; if it comes from the heart it sticks in the mind. Also remember that “Specificity is a must; general praise leads to a general malaise,” and “Timeliness is critical. Drift creates a rift.” Let R&R drift past the time a praise-worthy event occurred and you create a rift between receipt of the recognition and any potential for associated meaning.
Vincent PEIFFERT's curator insight, March 16, 2016 5:26 AM
(From the article): Deliberate the delivery
How you deliver rewards and recognition to employees can stick the landing or crash the landing. Don’t kill the intent. You should think through the delivery with attention to detail. For example, sincerity is key; if it comes from the heart it sticks in the mind. Also remember that “Specificity is a must; general praise leads to a general malaise,” and “Timeliness is critical. Drift creates a rift.” Let R&R drift past the time a praise-worthy event occurred and you create a rift between receipt of the recognition and any potential for associated meaning.
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Five Practices To Become The Best Boss You Ever Had

Five Practices To Become The Best Boss You Ever Had | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

An organization is a reflection of its leadership. According to a Gallup poll, 50 percent of Americans have left a job because of a bad employer-employee relationship. So it’s fair to say that being a better boss improves employee retention and the overall product, right?

 

Both of those goals can be met by authority figures being the same bosses to themselves as they are to employees. A manager can model the kind of behavior he wants his employees to display by consistently employing these five practices:

donhornsby's insight:
(From the article): Admit your mistakes.

By that same token, own up to your own faults to show your employees that you’re not perfect. More people will trust you because you are willing to be vulnerable.

Answer to your mistakes, fulfill your responsibilities, and expect your employees to do the same. This tactic shows your workers that:

You live by the same expectations you have for them.You are the example by which they should work.They each play an integral role on the team.If they fail to perform their duties or functions, then the whole team suffers.They contribute across all aspects of the business.

Errors happen, even if you’d rather they didn’t. If managers want to minimize their employees’ work-related mistakes, then they have a responsibility to shine a light on their own missteps.

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14 CEOs reveal the No. 1 job skill they look for in employees  

14 CEOs reveal the No. 1 job skill they look for in employees   | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

There's no shortage of career advice out there and everyone from your favorite self help gurus to your least favorite in-law thinks they're an expert on the subject. Good advice — useful, nuanced, and proven — is harder to come by. After all, it's tough to suss out what employers value in their workforce, or their applicant pool, without asking them directly. So we decided to do just that. Below, 14 CEOs reveal the skill they're most excited to see in an employee these days. Take note: Some of these will help you stand out at your current gig; others will give you an edge when you go to look for your next one.

1
donhornsby's insight:
Mike Whitaker, tech CEO, author of "The Decision Makeover": "The skill of adapting to what is changing , right now, preserves and drives a career. A career professional with the mindset of remaining adaptive expects the workplace and the customer to change tomorrow. So when the change occurs, they're already prepared. Those are the people I want working for me."
 
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Andrea Ross's curator insight, August 18, 2017 10:24 PM

For those of you that are climbing up that career ladder and have you eye on the big prize then this article will help you to focus on some key competencies to get you there. Set yourself apart from your competition and step forward... 

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How Bosses Can Make or Break Leadership Development Programs

How Bosses Can Make or Break Leadership Development Programs | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
CCL’s study of leadership development program alumni found the degree of support from participants’ bosses for their development activities made a significant impact on several outcomes. Selfawareness, leadership capability, leadership effectiveness, and engagement were
all significantly improved when participants had the support of their bosses.

For organizations investing in the development of their people—whether individual contributors or c-suite executives—this research means that participant engagement with a leadership development program is not the only factor influencing outcomes. Maximizing the value of leadership development initiatives requires organizations and their training and development partners to constructively engage bosses as well as participants.

This has important implications for individual leadership development program design as well as broader organizational and leadership development efforts. Companies are increasingly requiring a clear return on investment from leadership development programs and looking for ways to ensure such initiatives have a sustained impact. Engaging bosses is a key ingredient in that effort.

Via David Hain
donhornsby's insight:
The study suggests that when it comes to boss support, a little goes a long way.
 
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David Hain's curator insight, March 22, 2017 5:38 AM

Don't just spend leadership development money on those hi-potentials. Brief,debrief and coach them! Your follow-up is crucial!

Ron McIntyre's curator insight, March 23, 2017 11:21 AM

Title says it all because it is true.

Jose Luis Yañez's curator insight, April 1, 2017 12:57 PM
How Bosses Can Make or Break Leadership Development Programs
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Want to Be a Good Boss? Start by Understanding Why You Want to Lead

Want to Be a Good Boss? Start by Understanding Why You Want to Lead | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Research explores the pros and cons of two distinct leadership styles.
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“Good leaders intuit the need for one strategy over another,” Maner says. “But there is always room for improvement in knowing which hat to wear depending on the situation.”
 
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The Dark Side of High Employee Engagement

Although employee engagement has become something of an HR fad, it would be hard to deny that it matters. In fact, robust meta-analytic studies show that higher levels of engagement boost employee wellbeing, performance, and retention. For example, engaged business units tend to deliver better performance, as measured in terms of revenues and profits, and organizations with enthusiastic employees tend to have better service quality and customer ratings.

donhornsby's insight:
In short, we need to take a more balanced view of employee engagement. Managers need to think about how to create just enough tension in their workforce in order to trigger healthy competition and intrinsic motivation. A “one size fits all” approach to employee engagement is unrealistic, and the common understanding of engagement as “happiness” is too simplistic.
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15 Daily Habits That Will Help You Get a Raise

15 Daily Habits That Will Help You Get a Raise | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
If you bring more value to your job the boss is going to see that you are worth more money.
donhornsby's insight:
(From the article): Everyone can use a pay increase. While these tips won’t guarantee an immediate raise, they will help you build a long-term career with a company, complete with promotions and positive recognition. The goal is to create beneficial habits that will elevate you over the long term. In some instances, that may be even more gratifying than the extra money that comes with a raise.
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Employee Engagement Is A Leadership Commitment

Employee Engagement Is A Leadership Commitment | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Employee engagement is center stage in HR and The World of Work right now because it is vital to successful business. Here’s how to chart a path for engagement.
donhornsby's insight:
(From the article): How: Engagement isn’t magic, it’s craft. Engagement is built by creating trust, which engenders loyalty. It requires open communication, clearly-articulated goals and unambiguous expectations. It demands shared values and well-understood reward systems. Engagement is a journey, not a destination. It’s work. You have to get up every day determined to be more engaged, a better leader.
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Why Employees Don't Trust Their Leadership

Why Employees Don't Trust Their Leadership | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it
Of 33,000 workers globally, one in three said they don't trust their employer. What gives?
donhornsby's insight:
(From the article): One in three people don’t trust their employer. That’s according to the new Edelman "Trust Barometer", a survey of 33,000 people in 28 countries about trust in the workplace.

 Among the other notable findings, trust decreases down an organization’s hierarchy: 64% of executives, 51% of managers, and 48% of rank and file staff say they trust their organizations, and employees say they trust peers more than CEOs when it comes to company information. Right now, many workers have their choice of jobs that boast high earnings and a range of career opportunities. To stay competitive in the war for talent, most employers are offering a full complement of benefits and perks as well as beefing up their efforts to engage workers through inclusion initiatives. Indeed, many employees among the Top 100 Great Places To Work reported being satisfied with their jobs, but also having a high level of trust for their companies.

 That’s obviously not the case everywhere, according to the Edelman Trust Barometer. The survey revealed gaps between factors that employees rate as important for building trust and how their leaders rated based on those attributes.
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, April 7, 2016 11:21 PM
When we conflate management and leadership, treating them as the same thing, we make the mistake of missing what leading is. It cannot be defined, but, when we see it, we recognize it.
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Six Reasons Why Young Employees Will Want To Stay With Your Company

Six Reasons Why Young Employees Will Want To Stay With Your Company | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

 This article will attempt to identify some reasons why millennials (at least ones like me) want to stay at an organization, and what makes us jump around the industry, or even cross-over into a new one.

donhornsby's insight:
(From the article): Trust, transparency, feedback, honesty, and availability. These are all things we look for in a role and a company. We don’t separate work from personal life, which means we crave fulfilling and meaningful work. But, in order to get better everyday, we need some guidance from older, more experienced employees. Make yourself available, even if it’s just 10 minutes, where we can ask questions, get honest feedback, and combine our “learning by doing” with “learning by asking” to keep us curious, inspired, and devoted to do good work and produce results.
Take this mentorship one step further, and invest in our desire to learn. Send us to conferences and events where we’ll spend a day learning and listening to leaders in the industry. Connect us with your friends and contacts in the industry who are willing to grab coffee or talk on the phone. Support us if we want to enroll in an online course that’s related to our role and industry. We want to be better, smarter, more productive employees, and if we are committed to improving ourselves, you can help us out by supporting our drive.
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Vincent PEIFFERT's curator insight, March 16, 2016 5:22 AM
(From the article): Trust, transparency, feedback, honesty, and availability. These are all things we look for in a role and a company. We don’t separate work from personal life, which means we crave fulfilling and meaningful work. But, in order to get better everyday, we need some guidance from older, more experienced employees. Make yourself available, even if it’s just 10 minutes, where we can ask questions, get honest feedback, and combine our “learning by doing” with “learning by asking” to keep us curious, inspired, and devoted to do good work and produce results.
Take this mentorship one step further, and invest in our desire to learn. Send us to conferences and events where we’ll spend a day learning and listening to leaders in the industry. Connect us with your friends and contacts in the industry who are willing to grab coffee or talk on the phone. Support us if we want to enroll in an online course that’s related to our role and industry. We want to be better, smarter, more productive employees, and if we are committed to improving ourselves, you can help us out by supporting our drive.
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Millennials Forge Their Own Paths — Don’t Force Them To Follow Yours

Millennials Forge Their Own Paths — Don’t Force Them To Follow Yours | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

Today’s young professionals crave influence over acknowledgment. They care more about finding meaning and fulfillment in their work than they do about titles, promotions, and raises.

donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): Invest in your millennial employees, give them opportunities to lead, and solicit their feedback. By providing them with a chance to grow now, you can ensure that the future leaders of your company will be well-prepared for the challenges that lie ahead.

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Martin McGaha's curator insight, March 15, 2016 5:39 AM

(From the article): Invest in your millennial employees, give them opportunities to lead, and solicit their feedback. By providing them with a chance to grow now, you can ensure that the future leaders of your company will be well-prepared for the challenges that lie ahead.

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How to Manage Someone Who Rubs You the Wrong Way

How to Manage Someone Who Rubs You the Wrong Way | Surviving Leadership Chaos | Scoop.it

You can't love everyone who works for you. Here Inc. columnists share how to manage talented people who you find irritating.

 


Via The Learning Factor, Amy Ragsdale
donhornsby's insight:

(From the article): It's not that uncommon in larger companies to have employees who do a great job but their personality just rubs you the wrong way.  People are people and not everyone can be totally dispassionate. But a great manager can put aside their personal feelings and look objectively. I have mostly found that those people who make me uncomfortable are often my greatest teachers.

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The Learning Factor's curator insight, May 29, 2014 6:33 PM

You can't love everyone who works for you. Here we share how to manage talented people who you find irritating.

Joe Boutte's curator insight, June 13, 2014 6:21 AM

I think we all run into people that irritate us and this article from inc.com has some good pointers for overcoming irritation.  I wouldn't characterize it as "managing" irritating people, because we manage things.  We lead people, even those who irritate us, through influence and everyday leadership approaches to get the job or mission accomplished.