Access To Housing
28 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Michael Pilossoph from Public Education
Scoop.it!

Education rally to protest Common Core State Standards

Education rally to protest Common Core State Standards | Access To Housing | Scoop.it
As school districts across California prepare for the implementation of the Common Core State Standards, a concerned group of citizens is holding a rally at the state Capitol to protest the new requirements.

Via Katie
Michael Pilossoph's insight:

The new Common Core requirements are being protested by a concerned group of citizens.

more...
Katie's curator insight, May 27, 2014 1:10 AM

This is an article about a protest in Sacramento against the Common Core Standards system. I have some personal experience with the Common Core system. My little cousin lives in North Carolina where they have also implemented the Common Core. He is in the 4th grade and he is struggling with the new system to stay at the same level as his peers. I talked to his mom recently, who told me that many of her friends also dislike the system (mostly in the math department) because it forces the students to redo problems many times in different ways even if they understand a concept. She said that this makes the students less inclined to work and stay focused during class. One line that I found very valuable from the article is, "The groups call the new standards a privately backed, federal takeover of the state-run education system". Also, the video in this article shows students working mostly on laptops or other technologies to do their studying. This seems problematic to me because many public schools are unable to pay for computers for every student.

Rescooped by Michael Pilossoph from Displacement
Scoop.it!

Tips on how to survive S.F.'s gentrification war

Tips on how to survive S.F.'s gentrification war | Access To Housing | Scoop.it
The barbarians are indeed at the gate, bringing their catastrophic floods of money and their bland-izing suburban ways. Blocking the Google buses, storming the planning meetings, banning the Google Glass - will these sorts of things accomplish what you are fighting for, or are they merely Molotov cocktails being hurled against the inevitable? I have no idea. Fighting all change, no matter what it is, will surely lead to ruin: A woman called me the other day, irate about the fact that there is a proposal for a new hospital in our neighborhood. Unfortunately, the way things have worked in San Francisco has created a situation in which the only "new" people who can afford to live here are the ones who have nothing to offer but money. The lack of seriousness about this suggests to me that no one really wants to win small battles or accept a messy compromise - which means that the money will always win. [...] as usual, the greatest losers in San Francisco's gentrification war have been low-income people. Too often, when anti-gentrification folks try to speak for low-income people, they don't sound like they're worried about losing actual low-income individuals. If you're gong to make any assumptions, assume that low-income people have the same range of opinions on gentrification as everyone else in San Francisco. [...] I would urge all of those protesting it to channel an equal amount of energy into fighting for things like a higher minimum wage and inclusionary housing.

Via Displacement Project
Michael Pilossoph's insight:

Fighting against gentrification is unrealistic when the low income people of San Francisco "don't sound like they're worried". 

more...
Displacement Project's curator insight, May 8, 2014 4:02 PM

This is an article about surviving gentrification in SF. This article takes the approach that gentrification in SF is inevitable so rather than trying to stop it, opponents of gentrification should instead focus on how to live with it. The author claims that the right approach is to mitigate the affects of gentrification. However, that will of course come with some trade-offs. The last paragraph of the article is the strongest part in my opinion.

 

Seth Rosner

Amy Argenal's comment, May 9, 2014 12:03 AM
Really interesting perspective.
Amy Argenal's comment, May 31, 2014 8:36 PM
It is funny, because San Francisco is such a transplant city to begin with, I find sometimes that those fighting gentrification now were part of it 15 years ago.
Rescooped by Michael Pilossoph from Displacement
Scoop.it!

Hunters Point : ALEX WELSH

Hunters Point : ALEX WELSH | Access To Housing | Scoop.it
'We Out Here' - Hunters Point, San Francisco.

Via Displacement Project
Michael Pilossoph's insight:

I like these photographs because they outline the "box" from the video we watched in class.

more...
Amy Argenal's comment, May 13, 2014 11:33 PM
Joe, you bring up a really valid point, and also I think an assumption that we need to challenge around that part of the city. It actually has a very interesting history. I think KQED had something on it. I will see if I can find it.
Amy Argenal's comment, May 31, 2014 8:29 PM
I am glad you re-posted this Michael!
Katie's comment, June 8, 2014 12:34 AM
In my Environmental Science class we talked about Environmental Justice specifically in the context of Hunter's Point because that neighborhood is right on a superfund site. The area used to be an navy base and when the navy left they left behind many toxic chemicals, radiation and turned the area into an unsafe toxic zone. It is being cleaned up but the people who live in Hunter's Point are exposed to these toxic chemicals daily. The first photo on this website (of the playground burning) reminds me of this connection to environmentalism.
Rescooped by Michael Pilossoph from Displacement
Scoop.it!

What 3 Out Of 10 Homeless Adults Today Had In Common As Kids

What 3 Out Of 10 Homeless Adults Today Had In Common As Kids | Access To Housing | Scoop.it
Things that matter. Pass 'em on.

Via Displacement Project
Michael Pilossoph's insight:

Gentrification affects poorer people who cannot provide for themselves in a negative way. The draw back to letting in these newer tech companies is that they impede the growth of small businesses.

more...
Displacement Project's curator insight, May 12, 2014 10:42 PM

Some informative charts about children that are in foster care or are homeless. The charts discuss the how the number of children in foster care is decreasing dramatically, and yet the number of homeless children has not. 

 

-Joe

Amy Argenal's comment, May 13, 2014 11:28 PM
Do they talk about why? That is really interesting.... I feel like our foster care system needs to be reevaluated.
Rescooped by Michael Pilossoph from Displacement
Scoop.it!

What is gentrification? - YouTube

In the second panel, our guests reflect on what the term "gentrification" means in the District — one thing they all agree on, it means change.

Via Displacement Project
Michael Pilossoph's insight:

gentrification displaces businesses and people in certain living situations who are forced elsewhere because of their financial situations.

more...
Displacement Project's curator insight, May 20, 2014 8:54 PM

Informative video about gentrification in DC. 

Pros: 

It explains a broad definition of gentrification and gives a good background about it's history.

It brings in this idea of a personal context of gentrification, and what it means to that particular person in that particular neighborhood.


Gentrification is really interesting because it can manifest in so many different ways for so many different people, and this video definitely touched on that. 

 

-Alana

Amy Argenal's comment, May 22, 2014 5:30 PM
I also really appreciate the historical importance around communities!!!
Rescooped by Michael Pilossoph from Public Education
Scoop.it!

Read the Standards | Common Core State Standards Initiative

Read the Standards | Common Core State Standards Initiative | Access To Housing | Scoop.it

Via Katie
Michael Pilossoph's insight:

I like this organization because its goal is realistically attainable; standardizing a path for students to follow throughout school is noble.

more...
Katie's curator insight, May 1, 2014 4:00 PM

This is the official website of the Common Core State Standards. Common Core is a federal bill that has been adopted by 45 states including California. It is meant to help level the playing field for all American students so that they are all equally ready for college or professional jobs by the time they graduate from high school. Common core relates to our topic of financial equity between schools because common core was enacted, in part, because of the inequity between schools and how this has negatively affected schools and students' educations. 

Rescooped by Michael Pilossoph from Public Education
Scoop.it!

6-Year Old Girl Handcuffed, Arrested, Charged with Assault After Temper Tantrum

6-Year Old Girl Handcuffed, Arrested, Charged with Assault After Temper Tantrum | Access To Housing | Scoop.it

articASHEVILLE, N.C. - Salecia Johnson, age 6, grew frustrated in her Milledgeville, Ga., kindergarten class last year and erupted into a temper tantrum. Unfortunately, it's something that mothers sometimes must confront with raising young children. But what happened next was not routine, nor should it be happening to Salecia or any other children. Creekside Elementary school called the police, who said they found Salecia on the floor of the principal's office screaming and crying. Police said she had knocked over furniture that injured the principal. The African American child was handcuffed, arrested and hauled to the local police station. She was held for more than hour before her parents were notified and charged with simple assault and damage to property, but didn't have to go to court because she is a juvenile. But the ordeal has severely impacted the child. Her mother, Constance Ruff, says Salecia is traumatized, having difficulty adjusting back to school [...]


Via Katie
Michael Pilossoph's insight:

This article scares me because we cannot be treating our younger students like criminals.

 

more...
Katie's curator insight, May 27, 2014 1:52 AM

This article touches on a couple of important points. It focuses on Salecia Johnson's story: a 6 year old girl who was handcuffed, arrested, and detained at the local police station for over an hour because she threw a temper tantrum while at school. Her family is very angry and says that she is traumatized and is having a very hard time readjusting into school. The article also touches on the social justice aspect of this issue. It discusses The Advancement Project: a civil rights organization that tracks juvenile law enforcement and how it is affecting students of color more than white students. Due to racial biases on the part of teachers, administrators, and law enforcement officials, students of color have a higher likelihood of being punished (arrested, suspended, or expelled) even though there is no evidence that points to a higher likelihood of children of color acting out or being violent for whatever reason.

Amy Argenal's comment, May 28, 2014 12:59 AM
Powerful story. I am happy that you shared work of the Advancement project!
Rescooped by Michael Pilossoph from Access To Housing
Scoop.it!

A Traveler's Life for Me: Dropping Out in the Haight Isn't the Same Anymore

A Traveler's Life for Me: Dropping Out in the Haight Isn't the Same Anymore | Access To Housing | Scoop.it
"My traveler name's Will Share. Because I will share. You need a cigarette? I'll give you a cigarette. I'll fucking help you out, unlike most of the individualists in this country."
Billy Rosario &md...

Via Miranda Aaland
Michael Pilossoph's insight:

The stigma surrounding homelessness is strongly against helping them out of their economic situations. Progress would mean more family owned/operated businesses and smaller institutions helping them succeed.

more...
Miranda Aaland's curator insight, April 19, 2014 2:57 PM

This article explores the perspective of homeless living in the Haight more by choice than by circumstance. Alex Fisher for example, and 18-year-old "greasy-haired kid from North Carolina", took the Greyhound bus from North Carolina just two days earlier in search of some summer of love wonder. He and others admit Haight st. is not as spectacular as the old stories they hear about it. Nevertheless, many people a drawn to it. For this reason, "the residents of Hippie Hill illustrate the distinction in the homeless populations of San Francisco. One is homeless by circumstances beyond its control; the other, largely by choice."

Rescooped by Michael Pilossoph from Law Enforcement
Scoop.it!

Gary Haugen, "The Locust Effect: Why the End of Poverty Requires..." | Talks at Google - YouTube

Gary Haugen and Victor Boutros's "The Locust Effect: Why the End of Poverty Requires the End of Violence" focuses on the central role of violence in perpetua...

Via Sam and Phoebe
Michael Pilossoph's insight:

the biggest challenge is standardization of the prison systems in developing countries that are without access to any infrastructure as wealthier first world countries like the U.S.

more...
Sam and Phoebe's curator insight, April 20, 2014 8:45 PM

Google talk by Gary Haugen (author of the Locust Effect) about his book. He starts off with a startling story about a woman in Oregon. A nice overview of his book, without having to read it.

Scooped by Michael Pilossoph
Scoop.it!

A walk through The Tenderloin - San Francisco

I don't suggest you do this without a local guide.... I was lucky. ThatNikonGuy has been renamed to 'Matt Granger'. If you are already subscribed on social m...
Michael Pilossoph's insight:

The gentrification problem in the mission displaces poorer home owner who cannot afford the average cost of living. San Francisco's red light district has seen an influx of homelessness.

more...
Amy Argenal's comment, May 8, 2014 4:09 PM
Be sure to add your own comments to what you post...
Rescooped by Michael Pilossoph from Displacement
Scoop.it!

Gentrification report: Tenants group shows income shifts across Oakland, San Francisco

Gentrification report: Tenants group shows income shifts across Oakland, San Francisco | Access To Housing | Scoop.it
As the median income of neighborhoods in Oakland and San Francisco has gone up over the last 20 years, their demographics have shifted dramatically, with more white and less black residents, according to a report released this week by the housing activist group Causa Justa.

Via Displacement Project
Michael Pilossoph's insight:

More black residents than ever before are renting out homes as a result of gentrification in Oakland's neighborhoods.

more...
Displacement Project's curator insight, May 8, 2014 4:00 PM

A really good overview of the demographic shifts that are going on in Oakland and San Francisco. It's also a super recent article so the data is relevant to today. 

 

I think this is an interesting article because it highlights gentrification and displacement as a public health issue, not just as issue of loss of culture or physical homelessness/displacement. Changing the economic tides in a community forces people to make difficult decisions about living spaces that often impact health, like moving more bodies into a small space, moving far from services and necessities, and stress over eviction/loss of a neighborhood space. 

 

--Katie Wilson

Amy Argenal's comment, May 31, 2014 8:37 PM
Really interesting article!
Rescooped by Michael Pilossoph from Displacement
Scoop.it!

East New York Elderly Fight Displacement

East New York Elderly Fight Displacement | Access To Housing | Scoop.it
A new senior housing development in the neighborhood aims not just to address a citywide senior housing shortage, but also to create a foothold for the aged amid new real-estate investment.

Via Displacement Project
Michael Pilossoph's insight:

This quote is insightful: "Gentrification has very little to do with white hipsters moving into the ‘hood and everything to do with process of people who earn higher incomes moving into neighborhoods where folks reside who are earning comparatively lower incomes."

more...
Displacement Project's curator insight, May 8, 2014 4:10 PM

This article is interesting because gentrification is all about a city, or a part of a city being taken over by corporations and wealthier classes. So, looking at gentrification from the perspective of seniors is fascinating, because they have been alive to see the city change, and therefore their own life change. 

In New York, there is a deficit of senior housing, and "East New York seniors experience high levels of poverty, with 39 percent at or below the poverty level, compared with 31.8 percent of seniors citywide, according to Department of Aging statistics," so this article discusses an alternative for senior living. I've read a lot about displacement in San Francisco, but for seniors, a senior center seems like the perfect solution for displacement because seniors can live together and benefit from the solidarity of a senior community. 

However, the city of New York still has a long way to go in terms of housing. My major questions are about the sustainability and the cost of this solution. I do not doubt the ideals of this project, only the availability. A powerful quote from the article: "East New York needs its seniors." This is completely true. What is East New York without its history?

 -Ella

 

Amy Argenal's comment, May 31, 2014 8:33 PM
Ella, excellent questions! I believe Seniors have also been pushed out of China Town in San Francisco too. Michael, great point!
Rescooped by Michael Pilossoph from Displacement
Scoop.it!

Gentrification transforming face of Oakland

Gentrification transforming face of Oakland | Access To Housing | Scoop.it
Oakland lost almost half of its African American population from 1990 to 2011, and fewer African Americans own homes, says the report from Causa Justa, an Oakland housing advocacy group, and the Alameda County Public Health Department. [...] Oakland had some of the country's highest rents and rent increases in 2013, real estate data show. Scope of the reportThe 112-page report examined census figures on home sales and rents, as well as residents' income, race and education level over a 20-year period in San Francisco and Oakland. [...] last year he was forced out of there, as well, when his rent for a two-bedroom apartment jumped from $1,100 to $1,800, despite the neighborhood's high crime rate. Rising home prices and community investment have played a role in lowering crime, improving schools and bringing more amenities like grocery stores and banks, said Councilman Larry Reid, who represents East Oakland. Kate Phillips, a real estate agent who specializes in Maxwell Park, an East Oakland neighborhood near Mills College, said open houses these days are packed with 100 people or more, and most homes receive multiple offers. Keeping people in placeThe Causa Justa report emphasized that government and the public need to do more to keep low-income people in their homes so they can enjoy the benefits of gentrification without being displaced. Stricter rent control and antiforeclosure laws, more affordable housing and greater public input in planning decisions would help, the report said.

Via Displacement Project
Michael Pilossoph's insight:

The middle class benefits from gentrification more than most people would believe based on the resistance from certain communities.

more...
Displacement Project's curator insight, May 8, 2014 4:29 PM

Very thorough article that was published recently. 

 

 

It's cool that a federally funded report was issued and was so thorough also. 

 

This article points out that gentrification doesn't just mean white people coming in, especially in historically VERY low-income neighborhoods, because there is a large rising Latino middle class that's gentrifying oakland. 

 

 

--Katie WIlson 

Amy Argenal's comment, June 1, 2014 11:34 PM
Interesting comment, Michael! I am also very torn with my own situation. I have history in both cities, Oakland and San Francisco and the neighborhood I live in in Oakland is very new to me and it was because we could afford to live here. I find that most people in my neighborhood have only been there a few years and most are young white couples with young children. Many who could not afford to live in San Francisco.
Amy Argenal's comment, June 1, 2014 11:35 PM
Katie, I also like that this is funded by the government. It might start to speak to Joe's point about how displacement can require government support but is gentrification recognized as displacement. Maybe it needs to be.
Rescooped by Michael Pilossoph from Displacement
Scoop.it!

Shitty Neighborhood Rallies Against Asshole Developer

Shitty Neighborhood Rallies Against Asshole Developer | Access To Housing | Scoop.it
CHICAGO, IL—Many of those who live in the hopeless pit of a neighborhood say they are hesitant to allow the prick developer to dump a concrete-and-glass yuppie turd on it.

Via Displacement Project
Michael Pilossoph's insight:

Gentrification backfires when the target community is against the integration of new developing companies into their city.

more...
Displacement Project's curator insight, May 20, 2014 4:13 PM

I found this article on the Onion website, which  of course is a satirical website. It was written n 2007, which makes me wonder how much has changed in the last seven years in terms of gentrification, and the way people view it. The satire of the article seems to express the sentiments many people share about gentrification nowadays: that gentrification is good because it cleans up neighborhoods. I'd be lying if I said I didn't somewhat agree with that idea, but obviously the issue is more complicated than this article admits. People being pushed out of their homes is bad, even if their neighborhood is what might be called "shitty," to use the words of the Onion. 

 

-Joe

Amy Argenal's comment, May 22, 2014 5:41 PM
I appreciate how you are highlighting that this is NOT a new issue.
Rescooped by Michael Pilossoph from Public Education
Scoop.it!

Bully (2011)

Bully (2011) | Access To Housing | Scoop.it
Directed by Lee Hirsch. With Ja'Meya Jackson, Kelby Johnson, Lona Johnson, Bob Johnson. A documentary on peer-to-peer bullying in schools across America.

Via Katie
Michael Pilossoph's insight:

How are socially aggressive actions tied to the student drop out rates at a school?

more...
Katie's curator insight, May 1, 2014 3:39 PM

I've seen this movie a couple of times now. It's a pretty popular movie about bullying in public schools across America and the administration's efforts (or lack thereof) to try to stop the bullying. This movie covers a lot of perspectives (it gives voice to the administrators, the victims of bullying, the bullies, and the families of students. The movie's exploration of all of these voices draws me to the movie; I am impressed by this aspect of the documentary because it makes it more objective.

Rescooped by Michael Pilossoph from Public Education
Scoop.it!

How America's 'Toughest' Principal Fights For Her Students

How America's 'Toughest' Principal Fights For Her Students | Access To Housing | Scoop.it
CHICAGO -- When CNN's new eight-episode docuseries "Chicagoland" premiered earlier this month, one thing was clear almost immediately: its brightest-shining star was not who many anticipated it would be.

While Mayor Rahm Emanuel's face i...

Via Katie
Michael Pilossoph's insight:

I like how brave this principal was in dealing with the issues surrounding her school.

more...
Katie's curator insight, May 27, 2014 1:37 AM

"Chicagoland" is a new TV documentary miniseries on CNN. Liz Dozier is the principle at Fenger Academy (a high school in the south side of Chicago). When she started at Fenger, the school was extremely dangerous for students. At that time the school had a graduation rate of 43%, which has now climbed up to 73% in the last four years. As it says in the movie in the article, in the 2009 school year there were 300 arrests and the administration had to have two districts worth of police in the school on day just to help the students change classes. The school sits right between two gang territories in Chicago and there is a lot of outside influence on the  violence happening in the school. Dozier was given a four year federal grant when she came into the school in order to get the school back to thriving. "Chicagoland" does not center around the storyline of Principle Dozier although it continues to highlight the successes that she has helped Fenger achieve and the challenges she still faces. 

Rescooped by Michael Pilossoph from Access To Housing
Scoop.it!

Activists say San Francisco trying to wash away the homeless | Al Jazeera America

Activists say San Francisco trying to wash away the homeless  | Al Jazeera America | Access To Housing | Scoop.it
Pilot street-cleaning program downtown exacerbates wider Bay Area conflict over living space amid second tech boom

Via Miranda Aaland
Michael Pilossoph's insight:

Homeless person pushing his cart downtown. The Bay Area's homeless problem is escalating as a result of the tech boom. Wealthy businesses make it impossible for unstable individuals to pay for shelter.

 

more...
Miranda Aaland's curator insight, April 19, 2014 3:34 PM

"SAN FRANCISCO — The crack-cocaine users who sleep across the street from Victoria — or "bubble boys," as she has nicknamed them, after a slang term for drug use — screamed when Department of Public Works employees sprayed them with high-powered hoses a few weeks ago, she says"

 

I had no idea spraying people with high powered hoses was still a thing. It disgusts me that it happened in San Francisco and that i didn't know anything about it until now. We thank the lord for Martin Luther king and everyone else who fought for race equality, but we ignore the injustice of our present. This article describes the homeless as bubble boys, but they are also usually black people. If people or color were being sprayed in the  50's and they are being sprayed now, what has changed? Well, the ladder is happening way more discreetly, that's for sure.

Katie's comment, June 8, 2014 12:27 AM
This is crazy. I had no idea this was still happening either. Its especially disgusting because it is not publicized (at least in the 60's people knew it was happening). We live in San Francisco, and if this is happening here without the general public knowing I cant imagine what is happening in other parts of the country without anyone knowing. I also think it is interesting that this is both a class and racial issue.
Rescooped by Michael Pilossoph from Law Enforcement
Scoop.it!

Safety as a Civil Right (SSIR)

Safety as a Civil Right (SSIR) | Access To Housing | Scoop.it
Lawless violence in the developing world is a plague that undermines efforts to end extreme poverty.

Via Sam and Phoebe
Michael Pilossoph's insight:

I believe in safety for everyone in the world because it's our responsibility, but it's also in our best interest to coexist.

more...
Sam and Phoebe's curator insight, April 20, 2014 8:26 PM

Gary Haugen and Victor Boutros recently published a book called The Locust Effect. It is about the link between poverty and violence. They use numerous real-world examples to illustrate the book's core argument: that safety is the first civil right. The term "locust effect" (which I believe was coined by Haugen) is supposed to represent how, like locusts, violence "festers in the developing world [and] destroys everything in its wake." As Haugen and Boutros argue, no matter how hard we try to alleviate poverty in the developing world, "dead people can’t repay microloans." This review from the Stanford Social Innovation Review provides a nice summary of the book.

Amy Argenal's comment, May 8, 2014 2:55 PM
Don't forget to sign your posts......I need to know who you are.
Rescooped by Michael Pilossoph from Law Enforcement
Scoop.it!

the_globalisation_of_private_security.pdf


Via Sam and Phoebe
Michael Pilossoph's insight:

private military companies are becoming the focus of our private security efforts to regulate prison systems globally.

more...
Sam and Phoebe's curator insight, April 20, 2014 9:51 PM

Overview of a study of the private security industry and private security companies (PSCs) in Nigeria, Kenya, South Africa, and Sierra Leone. Findings consecrate the presence of a broken system. The privatization of security creates a situation where only the wealthy can afford protection, yet the national economies still rely on the private security industry to fund national services like the police.

Amy Argenal's comment, May 29, 2014 3:20 PM
Don't forget to sign your name law enforcement group! Not sure who this is?
Scooped by Michael Pilossoph
Scoop.it!

Instagram

karencoker's photo on Instagram (������������ #MissionDistrict #SanFrancisco #TaxTheRich #Art @ The Mission District http://t.co/WZoR5dp7IK)...
Michael Pilossoph's insight:

A vibrant and colorful mural rocking the slogan "TAX THE RICH" comments on gentrification as a problem of uneven wealth distribution. The mission is to end materialistic inequity.

more...
Amy Argenal's comment, May 8, 2014 4:19 PM
Again don't forget to add your comments.