Segregation in The United States
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The Black Panthers - Biography

The Black Panthers - Biography | Segregation in The United States | Scoop.it
The Black Panthers wanted to be the vanguard of a revolution that would create economic, social and political equality across gender and colour lines.
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Brown Vs. Board of Education Civil Rights case

Excellent investigation into the jounrey from Plessy vs Ferguson to Brown v Board. All in an interactive Flash format


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Ghandi

Ghandi | Segregation in The United States | Scoop.it
Mohandas Ghandi, a known champion for justice in the world and the inspiration for many civil rights movements is one of the most inspirational leaders in history.

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Rosa Parks and the Montgomery Bus Boycott [ushistory.org]

Rosa Parks and the Montgomery Bus Boycott [ushistory.org] | Segregation in The United States | Scoop.it
Rosa Parks and the Montgomery Bus Boycott

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Hunter Howard's curator insight, February 6, 2014 2:48 PM

The Montgomery Bus Boycott began the long process for MLK's many ventures that ended up putting him in the Birmingham jail.

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Segregation and Racism Black History Interview

I interviewed my uncle, Melvin Cross, about segregation and racism both during and after the Jim Crow Law era. I asked him questions about his experiences on...
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Freedom Riders

Freedom Riders | Segregation in The United States | Scoop.it

The mob was already waiting for James Zwerg by the time the Greyhound bus eased into the station in Montgomery, Alabama.

 

Looking out the window, Zwerg could see men gripping baseball bats, chains and clubs. They had sealed off the streets leading to the bus station and chased away news photographers. They didn't want anyone to witness what they were about to do.

Zwerg accepted his worst fear: He was going to die today.

 

Only the night before, Zwerg had prayed for the strength to not strike back in anger. He was among the 18 white and black college students from Nashville who had decided to take the bus trip through the segregated South in 1961. They called themselves Freedom Riders. Their goal was to desegregate public transportation.

 

He was drawn to the Freedom Rides after he was assigned a black roommate while attending Beloit College in Wisconsin. He grew to admire his roommate and was shocked to see how the young man was treated by whites when they went out in public together. So he volunteered to be an exchange student at Fisk University in Nashville, an all-black college, for one semester. He wanted to know how it felt to be a minority.

 

Zwerg's parents were unaware of the changes taking place in their son. They were enraged when they opened their local newspaper the day after he was attacked and saw the now-famous picture of their battered son on the front page.

 

Zwerg's anguish was compounded by his father's weak heart. He suffered a heart attack after he learned his son was attacked by a mob, and his mother had a nervous breakdown. "I had a tremendous amount of guilt," he says.

Even as the years passed and he was featured in documentaries and history books, Zwerg's parents never gave their approval.

 

After he stepped off the bus, Zwerg says, the crowd grabbed him.

In "Parting the Waters," Taylor Branch wrote that the mob had swelled to 3,000 people and described what happened to Zwerg: "One of the men grabbed Zwerg's suitcase and smashed him in the face with it. Others slugged him to the ground, and when he was dazed beyond resistance, one man pinned Zwerg's head between his knees so that the others could take turns hitting him.'"

 

Yet in the midst of that savagery, Zwerg says he had the most beautiful experience in his life. "I bowed my head," he says. "I asked God to give me the strength to remain nonviolent and to forgive the people for what they might do. It was very brief, but in that instant, I felt an overwhelming presence. I don't know how else to describe it. A peace came over me. I knew that no matter what happened to me, it was going to be OK. Whether I lived or whether I died, I felt this incredible calm."

 

Zwerg blacked out and didn't wake up until he was in a car. The mob had continued to beat him after he was unconscious. Being unconscious saved his life, he believes now. His body was relaxed, so it took the punishment better than if he had stiffened up to protect himself. Incredibly, no Freedom Riders were killed during the mob attack.

 

Even after he was taken to a nearby hospital, Zwerg learned later, he was not safe. "A nurse said she drugged me the first night because there was a mob coming within a block of the hospital to lynch me," he says. "She didn't want me to be aware of anything if they got me."

 

Zwerg entered the ministry after the beating. But he left in 1975, dejected by the politics of his job.

 

He never found the bond he experienced with the other Freedom Riders. "Each of us was stronger because of those we were with," he says. "If I was being beaten, I knew I wasn't alone. I could endure more because I knew everybody there was giving me their strength. Even as someone else was being beaten, I would give them my strength."

 

 

Read the passage above and answer the following questions:

 

1. What was the goal of the Freedom Riders?
2. Why was Zwerg drawn to the Freedom Riders?
3. What happened to Zwerg when he got off the bus?
4. Why did the nurse drug him while he was at the hospital?

5. Why do you think his parents did not support him?


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Overview - Little Rock Nine - Research Guides at Marquette University

Overview - Little Rock Nine - Research Guides at Marquette University | Segregation in The United States | Scoop.it
Research Guides. Little Rock Nine. Overview.

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Martin Luther King Jr's "I Have A Dream" Speech

An important part of MLK Jr's "I Have A Dream" speech. His Dream lives on!

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Black History Month: Rosa Parks

Black History Month: Rosa Parks | Segregation in The United States | Scoop.it

an Intermediate English lesson about Rosa Parks and The Montgomery Bus Boycott.


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Segregation in the southern United States during the Jim Crow laws period [Photos]

Photos about racial segregation in the Southern United States during the 1920's, 1930's, 1940's and 1950's. In those days, white southern governments (local ...
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