sea turtles
8 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Justin Cheng
Scoop.it!

Sea Turtles

Sea Turtles | sea turtles | Scoop.it

Click here to edit the title

Justin Cheng's insight:

1. Sadly, only an estimated one in 1,000 to 10,000 will survive to adulthood. 

2.In nature, sea turtles face a host of life and death obstacles to their survival. Predators such as raccoons, crabs and ants raid eggs and hatchlings still in the nest

3.Once they emerge, hatchlings make bite-sized meals for birds, crabs and a host of predators in the ocean

4.During the nesting season, turtle hunters comb the beaches at night looking for nesting females. Often, they will wait until the female has deposited her eggs to kill her. Then, they take both the eggs and the meat.

5.Hawksbill sea turtles, recognized for their beautiful gold and brown shells, have been hunted for centuries to create jewelry and other luxury items

6.Each year hundreds of thousands of adult and immature sea turtles are accidentally captured in fisheries ranging from highly mechanized operations to small-scale fishermen around the world

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Justin Cheng
Scoop.it!

Make Money By Saving Baby Sea Turtles

Make Money By Saving Baby Sea Turtles | sea turtles | Scoop.it
A visit to one of El Salvador's most inspiring sea turtle conservation projects
Justin Cheng's insight:

1.Possessing, selling, and consuming sea turtles is illegal in El Salvador,”
2.Her organization (the Spanish translation of “Live Blue”) works with professional egg collectors who bring the eggs that they find to three local hatcheries, where the eggs are protected until they hatch
3.Enriqueta’s audience is a group of about 50 turtle egg collectors
4.As an emergency measure, the new law has been successful. Over the past two years, roughly 80% of the turtle eggs in the country have been protected (about 1.5 millions eggs protected per year)
5.Without programs like this one, nearly every turtle egg in El Salvador would be consumed. The country has roughly 4,000 tortugueros, spread out along every major nesting beach in the country.
6.With people still getting used to the ban on consuming eggs, the large number of people earning income from turtling



more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Justin Cheng
Scoop.it!

Wireless sensor networks aid turtle conservation in Japan (Wired UK)

Wireless sensor networks aid turtle conservation in Japan (Wired UK) | sea turtles | Scoop.it
Conservationists in Japan are using wireless sensors in sea turtle nests to improve hatchlings' chances of survival
Justin Cheng's insight:

1.Conservationists in Japan are using wireless sensors in sea turtle nests to improve hatchlings' chances of survival.

2.Workers at the Kamogawa Sea World in Chiba, Japan, are working with the Japanese government to protect loggerheadsea turtles.

3.As part of this conservation project, some of the turtle eggs laid on the beaches of the Boso Peninsula are collected and reburied in a manmade beach inside the park

4.The team uses sensors made by Epson to measure underground temperatures and to monitor movement to see when the buried nests are starting to hatch

5.Epson developed two types of wireless sensing modules for the project -- one which measures temperature of the sand at 10cm intervals from a depth of 10cm down to 50cm below the surface. The other detects movement, thanks to a tilt sensor, and is placed above the eggs to record the time and date the turtles start to hatch.

6.The sensors have been designed to endure at least six months buried in the sand under difficult, volatile conditions. They borrow waterproof casing technology from Epson's watch division

more...
No comment yet.