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State governments 'destroying' plan to save Australia's most important rivers

State governments 'destroying' plan to save Australia's most important rivers | SDEHS Geography | Scoop.it
A $13 billion plan to rescue Australia's most important rivers is being "actively destroyed" by the NSW and Victorian governments, which refuse t
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Palm oil plantations are bad for wildlife great and small: study

Palm oil plantations are bad for wildlife great and small: study | SDEHS Geography | Scoop.it
Palm oil plantations have an overall negative impact on biodiversity, according to research released this week. The study, published in Nature Communications, found palm oil plantations are home to fewer…

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Elderly to be forced out of Millers Point as cheap rent deal comes to an end

Elderly to be forced out of Millers Point as cheap rent deal comes to an end | SDEHS Geography | Scoop.it
Non-profit community groups are being forced to pay hundreds of dollars a week in rent, throwing their viability into doubt, as the NSW government abandons "peppercorn rent" agreements that have been in place for decades.

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Sally Egan's curator insight, October 26, 2014 6:36 PM

This article is relevant to the issue of residential areas of Sydney and accesss to housing, appropriate to the case study of Sydney as a large city in the developed world.

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Where Has All the Water Gone?

Where Has All the Water Gone? | SDEHS Geography | Scoop.it

"Once the fourth-largest lake in the world, Central Asia's shrinking Aral Sea has reached a new low, thanks to decades-old water diversions and a more recent drought." 


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Zavier Lineberger's curator insight, March 28, 12:37 PM
(Russia) National Geographic explains the impact of the Aral Sea's disappearance with easy to follow bullet points. What is left of the sea is becoming saltier because evaporation and lack of water inflow. The incredible salinity is killing even those fish that could initially adapt. Although the rivers depositing into the sea were rerouted to irrigate crops, the farmlands are now becoming deserts as more than 40 million tons of salt are blown by the wind onto fertile land. To stop further desertification, the article recommends not buying cotton from the region, Uzbekistan's primary export. The geographic impact is not yet fully understood but it is clear that this is probably the worst man-made disaster in history, or at least the most visible.
Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, March 31, 2:28 PM
This article briefly discusses the disappearing Aral Sea. Once being the fourth largest lake, evaporation and water diversions have caused it to shrink significantly. Because the sea has always been salty, the disappearing water has caused the salt content to rise and has made the water practically unusable.
brielle blais's curator insight, April 1, 3:28 PM
This post showcases physical geography. The Aral Sea is dissipating, and it is leaving behind tons and tons of salt. This salt is affecting the local agriculture, such as in Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan, where the crops that are irrigated are suffering from the high salt levels. 
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Sydney house prices push families north to Queensland

Sydney house prices push families north to Queensland | SDEHS Geography | Scoop.it
As Sydney house prices skyrocket and traffic congestion worsens, some enterprising workers are moving north to seek the lifestyle they want in Queensland while continuing their careers in NSW.

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gina lockton's curator insight, October 16, 2014 8:44 PM

THis is good article looking at home affordability for SHELTER

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Troubles on Russia's Lake Baikal

"Workers at an ailing paper mill in Siberia are clinging to their jobs in the face of financial pressure and criticism from environmentalists.
Related Article: http://nyti.ms/gSvOkM"


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BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:15 AM

The environment, industry and politics play key roles in this story of an old style Soviet mono-town on Lake Baikal.  Monotowns had planned economies that revolved around one industry and today many of these are struggling in the post-Soviet era.  While the particulars of the political situation are a bit dated, the overall issue is still quite relevant to understanding Russia today. 

2013 update: The paper plant is now officially closed.   

 

Tags: Russia, industry, labor, environment, economic, water, pollution, environment modify, unit 6 industry.

Douglas Vance's curator insight, March 20, 12:18 PM
The Soviet Union's command and control economy allowed totally impractical industrial ventures like a paper mill on Lake Baikal to exist. This mill only served to employ workers and produce a good that would be sold at a set cost where profit is irrelevant. However, the mill's location away from any industrial center or shipping hub made the operation of such an isolated factory in a capitalistic economy totally unfeasible. Also, factors such as the environmental perfection of the lake's ecosystem adds additional pressure to cease operations. What can function in the Soviet Union does not always survive the forces of political and economic changes. 
Nicole Canova's curator insight, March 24, 2:38 AM
This shines a light on a couple of different issues.  First, the economic implications of monotowns.  Monotowns are towns with planned formal economies that are based on one industry.  Other, small businesses pop up to cater to the needs of the people who work in that central industry.  These monotowns were utilized throughout the Soviet Union, and some survive today.  One example of such a town is Baikalsk, a town on Lake Baikal that is centered around a paper mill.  The economic well-being of every resident of Baikalsk--the mill's employees, their families, and the owners of small businesses in the town-- is based in the success of the paper mill.  But on the other hand, the process of paper making has been polluting Lake Baikal for decades, which has led to environmentalists campaigning for the mill to be closed.
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Sydney's global economic corridor

Sydney's global economic corridor | SDEHS Geography | Scoop.it
A proliferation of knowledge based firms clustered in Sydney's inner suburbs present an uplifting counter-narrative to Australia's recent manufacturing gloom. Matt Wade and Sophia Phan report.
gina lockton's insight:

an interesting snippet for Urban Geography

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Sally Egan's curator insight, March 12, 2014 7:13 PM

Great relevance to Sydney case study and changing economic character of the city.

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Development at Woolloomooloo

Development at Woolloomooloo | SDEHS Geography | Scoop.it

New luxury apartments for Woolloomoolloo.


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gina lockton's insight:

Check this out - just next to SDEHS - Urban Development- Sydney Case study

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Sally Egan's curator insight, August 27, 2013 3:00 AM

A new development within Sydney. Great fior the case study of Sydney as a large city from teh developed world or for a study of an urban dynamic in a suburb.

Bec Seeto's curator insight, October 30, 2014 6:00 PM

A new development within Sydney. Great fior the case study of Sydney as a large city from teh developed world or for a study of an urban dynamic in a suburb.

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Box seat

Box seat | SDEHS Geography | Scoop.it
An apartment block in Waterloo is the first with an outdoor cinema.

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gina lockton's insight:

Urban Consolidation - Sydney Case Study

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Kate Corcoran's curator insight, August 20, 2013 7:26 PM

A great read on the advantages of urban consolidation 

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City's main rail corridor plan attracts global developers

City's main rail corridor plan attracts global developers | SDEHS Geography | Scoop.it
The architecture firm behind the world's tallest building has signalled it wants to develop Sydney's main rail corridor, as the state government fields global interest in a project to remake the central business district's southern edge.

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gina lockton's insight:

Sydney - Urban Case Study - good contemporary information

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Sally Egan's curator insight, August 27, 2013 3:02 AM

Useful for studying Sydney.

Sally Egan's curator insight, November 7, 2013 6:15 AM

Case study of Sydney. 

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City's main rail corridor plan attracts global developers

City's main rail corridor plan attracts global developers | SDEHS Geography | Scoop.it
The architecture firm behind the world's tallest building has signalled it wants to develop Sydney's main rail corridor, as the state government fields global interest in a project to remake the central business district's southern edge.

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Sally Egan's curator insight, August 27, 2013 3:02 AM

Useful for studying Sydney.

gina lockton's curator insight, August 27, 2013 5:55 AM

Sydney - Urban Case Study - good contemporary information

Sally Egan's curator insight, November 7, 2013 6:15 AM

Case study of Sydney. 

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Learn - City of Sydney

Learn - City of Sydney | SDEHS Geography | Scoop.it
Discover the stories behind Sydney’s past and present, including demographics, history and archives.

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gina lockton's insight:

Urban - worth the read on SYDNEY

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Sally Egan's curator insight, June 27, 2013 9:32 AM

Useful overview of Sydney for the case study of Sydney as a large city form the developed world. Use as a starting point for understanding the natur of the city, changes and the resukts of the urban dynamics that have shaped the city.

Sally Egan's curator insight, November 7, 2013 6:17 AM

Worth the read relating to case study of Sydney.

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Paying huge Sydney prices for tiny places

Paying huge Sydney prices for tiny places | SDEHS Geography | Scoop.it
A GARAGE that is more expensive than a family home, a single carpark costing a year's wages, a tiny storage cage the price of a family car.
gina lockton's insight:

Urban Geography: Sydney Case Study

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Sally Egan's curator insight, August 1, 2013 7:30 PM

Appropriate data for the study of Sydney and the changing nature and cost of residential property in Sydney.

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Why Almost Nobody Lives In Most Of Canada

Why Almost Nobody Lives In Most Of Canada | SDEHS Geography | Scoop.it

"Canada: land-wise, it's one of the world's biggest countries, but population-wise, it's anything but.The map comes from the Government of Canada's 'Plant Hardiness Site,' which contains images showing 'Extreme Minimum Temperature Zones' throughout the Great White North."

 

Tags: Canada, map, North America, weather and climate.


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Alex Vielman's curator insight, September 21, 2015 11:46 PM

It really isn't much of a shock that one of the world's biggest countries, Canada, does not have a large population. The obvious reason is because the temperatures reach extremely low. Not a lot of people live in Northern Quebec, Yukon, or Nunavut. Its interesting to think that a country so big has mostly all its population in cities along the border line of Canada and the U.S. One of the thoughts that comes to mind is how, Canada has all this 'empty' territory, with little to no activity happening in certain areas, is this land really Canada's to claim? We hear people always talking about the touristic areas like Niagara Falls or Toronto, but what makes places like Nuvavut, Canada? Its almost like if half of Canada is actually Canada. 

Overall, it is completely understandable that no one will want to live in extreme cold temperatures but it would be interesting to learn more about these Canadian States. 

James Piccolino's curator insight, January 31, 6:28 PM
I almost feel bad about complaining of the temperatures here in Rhode Island. I also have to call attention to the fact that the article calls -26 degrees bearable! I always figured the image of roaming moose and deep snow all over the place was just a bit of a stereotype of a vast geographically diverse country. After seeing this map, I can say that I believe it for the most part now.  
tyrone perry's curator insight, February 4, 8:52 AM
I feel a lot of people look at Canada and think that it is this enormous country with a huge population, but they don't realize how much of the country is inhabitable.  Vegetation is important to live.  Canada has many extreme cold temperature zones.  these zones range from 3.9c to 56.7c.  The higher it goes the less inhabitable it gets.  I myself never realized how cold it was in the lower part of Canada.  That's way to cold for me. 
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Like eating fish? It's time to start caring where it comes from

Like eating fish? It's time to start caring where it comes from | SDEHS Geography | Scoop.it
Australians love seafood. Whether it’s fish and chips by the seaside or prawns on the barbie at Christmas, it’s integral to many of our traditions and social gatherings. Yet very little of the seafood…

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Incredible photos show mountains of plastic bottles washed in Maldives

Incredible photos show mountains of plastic bottles washed in Maldives | SDEHS Geography | Scoop.it
Award-winning filmmaker Alison Teal, 27, from Hawaii, visited Thilafushi – or Trash Island - an artificial island created as a municipal landfill situated to the west of Malé. 

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 2, 2014 6:17 PM

Option topic:  Marine Environments and management 

dilaycock's curator insight, October 3, 2014 8:07 PM

Oh wow. Such a disjuncture between what we imagine and the reality. I'm in a school where many of the students are beach-goers and surfers. These images should make them angry and get them thinking (and hopefully, acting).

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Visualizing Earth's Physical Systems

Visualizing Earth's Physical Systems | SDEHS Geography | Scoop.it

"An animated map of global wind and weather. Join the Facebook community.  Seen here are the dual menaces, Cyclone Hudhud and Typhoon Vongfong (as seen from ISS)."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 7, 2014 2:18 PM

Earlier I shared a dynamic map of near-live wind data for the United States and a static rendering of global wind patterns.  This combines the features of both of those resources to provide a mesmerizing digital globe.  This visualization of global weather conditions is updated every three hours from supercomputer data projections.  Click on the 'earth' text in the lower left-hand corner to customize the display.  For examining the wind patterns and oceans currents, this is much more useful than Google Earth; this is definitely one of my favorite resources.


Tagsphysical, weather and climate, mapping, visualization.

Pam Anderson's curator insight, October 12, 2014 11:48 AM

this might interest some of our teachers who are studying weather With their students.  I just think this site is fascinating!

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Scandinavian Energy Usage

Scandinavian Energy Usage | SDEHS Geography | Scoop.it

Which countries consume the most electricity per person? You might guess the United States would top the World Bank’s list, but the Nordic countries of Iceland, Norway, Finland, and Sweden are actually at or near the top. Icelanders consume an average of 52,374 kilowatt hours per person per year, Norwegians 23,174 kilowatt hours, Finns 15,738 kilowatt hours, and Swedes 14,030 kilowatt hours. Americans are not far behind, with an average consumption of 13,246 kilowatt hours per person. The Japanese consume 7,848 kilowatt hours.

 

This image is part of a global composite assembled from data acquired by the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (Suomi NPP) satellite in 2012. The nighttime view of Earth was made possible by the “day-night band” of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite. VIIRS detects light in a range of wavelengths from green to near-infrared and uses filtering techniques to observe dim signals such as city lights, wildfires, and gas flares. The city lights of several major Nordic cities are visible in the imagery, including Stockholm, Sweden (population 905,184); Oslo, Norway (634,463); Helsinki, Finland (614,074), and Reykjavik, Iceland (121,490).

 

Tags: Europe, energy, remote sensing, development, Sweden, Finland, Iceland, Norway.


Via Seth Dixon
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Lena Minassian's curator insight, February 18, 2015 7:17 PM

This articles discusses which countries use the most electricity and believe it or not, the Nordic countries are at the top of the list. It shows two satellite images in the nighttime for you to get a better visual as to which areas of these countries use the most electricity. There are multiple factors that go into these countries consuming this much energy. One factor that is interesting is the high demand for electricity because of the long winters in these countries. 

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 6, 2015 9:34 AM

These images are really interesting and expose just how much electricity the Scandinavian countries actually use. It is surprising to think of these nations as large energy consumers because of their general reputation as progressive, clean, and liberal places. This brief article is an excellent example of how maps and satellite images can be misleading, though. As opposed to places like the U.S. or China, energy consumption in the Scandinavian countries actually produces only small amounts of greenhouse gases and is based on renewable energy sources. 

 

This shows an interesting and not immediately apparent geographic distinction between the Scandinavian countries and places such as China and the U.S. Chinese and United States energy consumption is enormous because of those countries' ability and desire to produce large amounts of goods quickly. Household energy use is also high because of the widespread use of electronics such as televisions, computers, and appliances. The Scandinavian countries, on the other hand, have a need for increased energy use because of their geographic location: long, dark winters mean an increased need for electricity and for longer periods. Also, Scandinavia is able to produce energy at lower costs due to its use of renewable energy sources. So though those countries may consume much more energy than their non-Scandinavian counterparts, they are doing so responsibly and for a reason. 

Katie Kershaw's curator insight, February 22, 11:41 AM
This map of Scandinavian energy usage holds a lot of insight to what this region of the world is like.  Shockingly, Scandinavians all use more electricity per person per hour than the U.S.  The people in Iceland use the most electricity of any other country and they use more than double the next closest consumer, at 52,374 kw/hour.  This made me scratch my head a bit at first, because when I think of large energy consumers I think of Americans with huge t.v.s with surround sound, central air, and more useless kitchen appliances than anywhere else.  However, the article goes on to explain the conditions that contribute to Scandinavians high power usage.  First of all, they are located in a region with a very harsh climate.  They must use tons of electricity to heat their buildings.  Additionally the months of darkness in some regions require lights to be in constant use.  Another regional factor that leads to high electricity usage is manufacturing.  Since the region is abundant in natural resources like aluminum, a lot of electricity is needed to turn these resources into usable goods.  The natural resources in Scandanavia also keeps electricity prices cheap, so people are more likely to use high amounts.  Despite the high electricity usage by Scandanavians make minimal pollution because the sources of power they use are renewable resources.  This makes sense because these countries are able to harness a lot of hydropower with their access to the ocean and waterfalls. 
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The long and ugly tradition of treating Africa as a dirty, diseased place

The long and ugly tradition of treating Africa as a dirty, diseased place | SDEHS Geography | Scoop.it
How alarmist, racist coverage of Ebola makes things worse. A dressing down of the latest #NewsweekFail.

Via Seth Dixon
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Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, April 9, 2015 2:21 PM

Before I even read the article, my first thought went to the Linneaus classification.  That really damaged history with this one chart.  I think people still think of Africans and blacks(very dark blacks) as dirty or unintelligent.  Which is horrible and couldn't be further from the truth.  Misinforming the public is criminal.  News media and social media need to be careful and educate properly.  I've been asked from a customs offical, "Have you been to Africa in the past 6 months?"  Which is a very blanket question because Africa is a continent.  There were areas that were not hit with Ebola.  

Chris Costa's curator insight, October 27, 2015 4:37 PM

Those who deny the continued influence of racism in our society are blinding themselves to the truth. Contemporary influences of the racism that plagued the preceding centuries are still found in most major media depictions of Africa. The Ebola epidemic has served to highlight the bigotry that plagues Western media, as the assumption that all of Africa is diseased and dirty is continuously perpetuated (when, in reality, Ebola only affected a very small part of the continent). Africa is presented as "other," a backwards continent that is in desperate need of Western help and guidance- in what was is that different from the European colonizers who also viewed their actions as benevolent attempts to "civilize" the uncivilized? That mindset has not left Western circles, and yet we continue to pat ourselves on the back and congratulate ourselves for suddenly being so tolerant. The insensitivity of Western audiences to the concerns of black individuals both at home and in Africa related to the prevalence of racism highlights how determined mainstream media is to deny the existence of a problem. Until we recognize the Eurocentrism that continues to plague our media and make the necessary moves to correct the practice, harmful depictions of Africa will continue to loom large in Western media and in the opinions of many Europeans and Americans alike.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 30, 2015 7:12 AM

Africa has long been treated by the western media as a dark , brutish, uncivilized place. Africa is a place were people starve and murder each other in large numbers. There is so much more to Africa than the picture I just described. The problem is, many people just do not accept the existence of a culturally complex Africa. That narrative would destroy the traditional  darker narrative of the past 500 years. A narrative grounded in the beliefs that blacks are inherently inferior beings. During the Ebola crises, the calls to cut off travel to Africa were quick and demanding. Had the crises been in England, would those same calls have been so loud? I think we all can guess the answer  to that question. Much progress has been made, but we still need to change our cultural depiction of Africa.

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Why don't trees grow above a particular altitude? › Ask an Expert (ABC Science)

Why don't trees grow above a particular altitude? › Ask an Expert (ABC Science) | SDEHS Geography | Scoop.it
gina lockton's insight:

this is a really interesting article - relevant to the Biosphere

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Sally Egan's curator insight, October 9, 2013 6:56 PM

This is a great article to explain biophysical interactions and the resulting diverse ecosystems of the World.

Sally Egan's curator insight, October 9, 2013 6:58 PM

Great article explaining biophysical interactions that result in diverse global ecosystems.

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Eyewitness video of 2011 Tsunami

"This video captures some amazing footage of the 2011 tsunami in Japan."


Via Sally Egan
gina lockton's insight:

Biophysical Geography - check this out!

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Rebecca Cofield's curator insight, August 17, 2013 9:29 AM

Incredible footage! Amazing to see how quickly the environment can change, the awesome power of nature.

 

Mary Rack's comment, August 17, 2013 10:28 AM
I kept wondering what happened to the people filming & watching in the next few hours. How long before they were rescued? Where did they go then? I wish there were a way to find out. Since we have the video maybe we can get some information about them.
Sally Egan's curator insight, August 19, 2013 6:46 PM

Wow... nothing yu read or study can inform like the real footage.

 

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Climate change to harm all forms of marine life, study says

Climate change to harm all forms of marine life, study says | SDEHS Geography | Scoop.it
Rising levels of carbon dioxide are harming all forms of marine life because the oceans are acidifying as they absorb the gas, German researchers found.

Via Kate Corcoran
gina lockton's insight:

Biophysical and Contemporary Issues - a good read

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Barangaroo Headland Park Public Open Day | What's On - City Of Sydney

Barangaroo Headland Park Public Open Day | What's On - City Of Sydney | SDEHS Geography | Scoop.it
Your opportunity to see what Barangaroo's been up to. Headland Park Public Open Day on 4 August 2013.
gina lockton's insight:

This weekend - If you study URBAN GEOGRAPHY and do Sydney as a Case study - this would be a GREAT way to study in-situ...

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Sally Egan's curator insight, August 1, 2013 7:27 PM

A great opportunity if you are in Sydney at this time. Also you could use links to the website to see further information about teh development.

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The Hottest Day On Record ... In Siberia?

The Hottest Day On Record ... In Siberia? | SDEHS Geography | Scoop.it
Did the Arctic region break a heat record?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 27, 2013 10:46 PM

The Siberian Times is reporting a record heatwave for towns such as Norilsk that are both North of the Artic Circle and built on permafrost.  While on the global scale the climatic shifts are quite alarming, there are many in Siberia that see global warming as a mixed bag.  In what some would have you believe is an unrelated news item, the North Pole is experiencing the formation of large meltwater ponds


Tags: physical, weather and climate, Arctic, climate change.

Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, July 28, 2013 4:25 PM

Global warming...no...Siberia is supposed to be a cold dark place...according to my Dad!

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Apartment demand keeps rising - Sydney Morning Herald

Apartment demand keeps rising - Sydney Morning Herald | SDEHS Geography | Scoop.it
Apartment demand keeps rising
Sydney Morning Herald
Big money: Agents expect to get more than $13 million for penthouses in the Sydney Wharf project n Pyrmont.

Via Sally Egan
gina lockton's insight:

HSC: Urban - Sydney

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Sally Egan's curator insight, July 17, 2013 9:05 PM

Shows changing trends in demand for housing tyupes in Sydney. Use for case study of Sydney as a arge city from developed world.

gina lockton's curator insight, July 21, 2013 11:19 PM

HSC: Shelter