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Social Media and Place

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“ Facebook most social cities: People everywhere use Facebook to check in to places. Here you can see the 5 top hotspots of the most "social"cities.” Questions to ponder: What attributes do these commonly 'checked into' landmarks have in common? Are you surprised that some are or are not on the list? Tags: socialmedia, place, tourism, infographic, London, NYC, Paris.
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The most famous trips in history

The most famous trips in history | Scoop it to Evernote APHuG | Scoop.it

"An interactive map to explore history's greatest journeys, from Magellan to Kerouc." 


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Carmen Arias 's curator insight, October 20, 2014 5:41 PM

Interesting!

David Baker's curator insight, October 27, 2014 1:15 PM

I shared this with many social studies teachers. Helping students to explore interactively is a great tool to build interest and gain perspective.

Treathyl Fox's comment, February 24, 2016 1:51 PM
WOW! Cheap travel and vacation. Fun, educational and can go there right from your laptop! Two thumbs up for this share.
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sharegeography.co.uk

sharegeography.co.uk | Scoop it to Evernote APHuG | Scoop.it

This is a fantastic resource for all geography teachers that is regularly updated.  With resources that are tailored for the UK's curriculum, it is technologically innovative.  The majority of the links will be found on twitter at #geographyteacher. 


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2011 UN Human Development Report

2011 UN Human Development Report | Scoop it to Evernote APHuG | Scoop.it
The Human Development Report (HDR) was first launched in 1990 with the single goal of putting people back at the center of the development process in terms of economic debate, policy and advocacy.

 

With a host of links that connect you to videos, charts, statistics about both the present and projections into that future, this is a fantastic resource for any lesson on development. 


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Seth Dixon's comment, December 3, 2011 8:39 AM
Thanks for recooping the link...I think this one will be incredibly valuable.
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Latin@s are contributing most to the declining U.S. birth rate

Latin@s are contributing most to the declining U.S. birth rate | Scoop it to Evernote APHuG | Scoop.it

The U.S. birth rate has dropped over the last two years, and each ethnic group within the United States has seen a decline in birth rates. What may surprise some is that the Latino population has seen the greatest drop in birth rates, declining by 5%. Fertility rates in the country are also at their lowest since the 1990s. What will this mean for the future of the U.S.? How does this fit in with what we know about the Demographic Transition? What factors account for the largest drop in birth rates coming from the Latino population?


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Urban Agriculture: Industrial-Sized Rooftop Farm Planned for Berlin

Urban Agriculture: Industrial-Sized Rooftop Farm Planned for Berlin | Scoop it to Evernote APHuG | Scoop.it
It is hardly a logical spot for a farm, but three Berliners have earmarked a massive former factory roof for an unusual urban agriculture venture.

 

Urban agriculture within an industrial landscape is reshaping our cities, food systems and rural areas. What economic factors are making this happen?  What cultural factors explain the growth of this phenomenon?  


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Mr. Gresham's curator insight, April 10, 2014 10:19 AM

I wonder what Von Thunen would think of this!

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Freakonomics: What Will Globalization Do to Languages?

Freakonomics: What Will Globalization Do to Languages? | Scoop it to Evernote APHuG | Scoop.it

"The headline says it all, although the unspoken question is: will globalization indeed result in the hegemony of English, as has long been promised/threatened?"  This is a forum with Christian Rolling (U.N. interpreter), Mark Liberman (Linguistics professor at Penn), Henry Hitchings (author of 'Secret Life of Words'), and John Hayden (president of an ELL site).


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The Geography of College Football Fans

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The possible realignment of college football conferences raises a host of interesting questions about fan loyalty.

 

As the regular season ends, SEC country (the Deep South) feels vindicated while the Midwest feels underappreciated.  Why is college sports more regionalized in fan bases?  How is realignment reshaping these geographies? 


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Geographic Distribution of Bowl Games...

Geographic Distribution of Bowl Games... | Scoop it to Evernote APHuG | Scoop.it

This current image can be used to teach spatial thinking and analysis.  What are the economic impacts of these patterns?  What explains this distribution? How does this impact tourism? 

 


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The next small thing: How sustainable neighborhoods could reshape cities

The next small thing: How sustainable neighborhoods could reshape cities | Scoop it to Evernote APHuG | Scoop.it
Residents and planners around the country are dreaming up innovative ways to create eco-friendly, self-reliant communities. But turning ideas into reality is a tall order.

 

Urban revitalization projects gentrification have been an important part of the American scene since the 1990s.  As we reconsider the city, and some of the associated issues with dense living, many are also thinking about the environmental impact of urban life and rethinking how to make neighborhoods more sustainable.  This article uses the Denver Lower Downtown (LoDo) neighborhood as its case study for analyzing sustainability with the city.  


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Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, November 19, 2013 3:11 PM

Here we have the perfect example of the positive effects associated with gentrification. Unused and weathering space being revitalized and re-purposed for the benefit of local economy and communitites. Not only that but the intention of these projects is to also operate in an ecologically sustainable manner by using as little resources as possible. The occupation of mill space is something that's even been seen here in Providence, most notably the hope artiste building in Pawtucket on the Providence line.

Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 5:38 PM

I have totally thought about this before, and a family that I know just spent the past several months remodeling their house to be more 'green.'  I think that in addition to energy, neighborhoods could have community grow-ops, where they grow all the necessary crops to sustain their area- fruits, vegetables, grains, cotton, etc. and I think that the communities would be cleaner, greener, and brought more together if they had the opportunity to work every day to provide for themselves and their community.  I miss out on a lot of enjoyment in life because I have to do things like school.  Other people miss out because they have work, or other obligations.  I think that if people farmed as communities, it would be economically, environmentally, and socially proficuous, as well as eliminating a need for capitalistic trade with other regions, where people might get cheated.  I have so many ideas of Utopia that I have gotten from reading and philosophizing with friends and acquaintences, but there really are so few people that have the ability to implement anything on a large scale, that I am often frustrated with these concepts of 'betterment.'  It really is sad that people are taught so much these days, because their brains are full of garbage, rather than new possibilities.  It would be really interesting to have an experimental colony where these ideas of sustainability could be tried out, but I think that will happen long after my generation has died.

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Pearl Harbor Attack Map - National Geographic Education

Pearl Harbor Attack Map - National Geographic Education | Scoop it to Evernote APHuG | Scoop.it
Pearl Harbor Interactive (Do you want to learn more about the events of December 7, 1941?

 

Where and when did the Pearl Harbor attack take place?  How did geographic factors play a role in the battle?


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Kimberly Tenuta's curator insight, May 25, 2017 7:34 AM

Interactive learning lesson about Pearl Harbor and all the events that followed 

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Parag Khanna maps the future of countries

TED Talks Many people think the lines on the map no longer matter, but Parag Khanna says they do. Using maps of the past and present, he explains the root causes of border conflicts worldwide and proposes simple yet cunning solutions for each.

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Dovid's curator insight, October 17, 2013 8:24 AM

Move on from border conflicts by using infrastructure that allows for the economic independence of every region.  

Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, November 8, 2013 9:25 AM

This TED talk focuses on political geography, specifically, borders of the past and the present.  Parag Khanna proves that borders matter because they explain conflicts between spaces that made these spaces sovereign nation-states and countries.  Borders explain who was in power at certain times in history and what resources and materials were sought after at that particular time.  With 200 countries represented on a political map today, the borders separating all of these countries were formed for particular reasons.

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AP Central - Become an AP Exam Reader

AP Central - Become an AP Exam Reader | Scoop it to Evernote APHuG | Scoop.it
The AP Human Geography reading will take place in Cincinnati, OH from June 2-8 2012. Currently they are still seeking out more readers. Do you teach the high school course or an equivalent college course? This is one of the greatest networking opportunities to meet other geography educators (and the pay doesn't hurt).
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How Twitter Proves That Place [still] Matters

How Twitter Proves That Place [still] Matters | Scoop it to Evernote APHuG | Scoop.it
“ Social networks haven't replaced proximity - they just reinforce the importance of being near your friends and co-workers...” Why is place still important in an era of digital communication that was designed to 'conquer' distance and place? What are the limits of globalization?
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Map Fight

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 11, 2014 3:02 PM

This simple WebApp allows the user to compare areas that are hard to compare on a map or globe because of distance or the map projection.  Competitive students love to hypothesize and then verify.  This helps strengthen student's mental maps and their ability to make regional comparisons. 


Tagsmapping K12, perspective, scale.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 20, 2014 12:40 PM

unit 1

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Blueseed: Business' New "Spatial Fix"

Blueseed: Business' New "Spatial Fix" | Scoop it to Evernote APHuG | Scoop.it

Many site outsourcing as a way in which global corporatations are seeking to avoid the typical economic limitations that have been imposed on job production based on geography.  Some refer to it as a 'spatial fix,' a way to get around the high cost of workers in the developed world being reworking how business gets done.  

 

This takes that to an entirely different level.  The benefits of agglomeration and collaboration help to explain the importance of Silicon Valley.  Entrepreneurs from other countries do not all have access to a comparable location with a high concentration of intellectually driven enterprises that amplify their impacts.  The Blueseed Project intents to, in essence create a floating city in international waters (just off the coast of California) that is outside of U.S. governmental jurisdiction, but easily accessible for Silicon Valley executives.   

 

More questions than answers arise from this project.  How are economic restructurings altering governance?  Are borders becoming less or more important with increased technological advances?  Would this be a benefit to developing world economies or strengthen the Silicon Valley's economic importance in research and development?     


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Shifting sands: Changing Geography of the Mexican Drug War

Shifting sands: Changing Geography of the Mexican Drug War | Scoop it to Evernote APHuG | Scoop.it

FIVE years ago next week, Felipe Calderón took office as Mexico’s president and launched a crackdown against organised crime.

 

While the rates of murders are plateauing at 12,000 per year, internally where are these murders taking place?  Which places are becoming more critical to control?  Murders are shifting east (From Sinaloa and Chihuahua to Nuevo Leon and Veracruz).  Why is this shift occurring?  What does this shift indicate politically and economically for Mexico?


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Brett Sinica's curator insight, September 29, 2013 1:27 PM

These numbers are astonishing especially when based simply on drugs, money, and power.  Compared to the article where it described Tijuana as still being one of the major cities for murder, the numbers and color scheme seem to show the region as one of the areas with less murders.  Heading south into the country, is Mexico City.  The city which is surrounded by such a large metropolitan area with a vast gap between poor and rich tends to have low murder rates.  This is very interesting considering popular belief tends to focus on such violence being conducted in large cities where there is better chance of cartels using the neighborhoods and people within them to strengthen their empire.  This makes me wonder if the authorities are too strong for cartels to infiltrate and become powerful, or on a limb, do the cartels have a mutual agreement not to do business in the country's economical and cultural hub?

Julia & Eva's curator insight, November 29, 2013 5:34 PM

This artilce falls under the category of political. It shows that Mexico's continuing drug war has effected the people that live there with lots of violence. By getting a new president, their murder rates have gone down, which has had a significant benefit on their country.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 3, 2014 1:20 PM

In Mexico there is a long standing tradition of the cartels working with officials to make sure their drug operation remain intact. With opportunities at a minimum in these rural areas where drug lords exist, the drug business provides youths with an opportunity they would otherwise not have. In Mexico the informal economy keeps many of these states in business. This shift is only evidence of where police are cracking down and where disputed territories exist. Cartels that have a stronghold over a territory with police cooperation don't need to increase their causality rate to maintain order.

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Industrial geography and internal markets

China's reputation as a low-cost manufacturer hasn't translated into low-cost prices. Many goods, particularly luxury items, have higher price tags in China than abroad. One economist blames the transportation system and corruption.

 

Industrial geography in today's climate shows that China has clear economic advantages over most of the world to manufacture good cheaply.  Why would this not necessarily translate to cheap consumer goods for China's domestic market?  High taxes, steep internal shipping costs and a market flooded with knock-offs all contribute to this paradox. 


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Matt Mallinson's comment, November 19, 2012 11:08 AM
To be honest I always thought items were made cheap in China due to all the items I see with the "Made in China" tag. This was interesting to me and definitely gave me knowledge on the topic.
Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 9, 2013 1:29 PM

Almost everyone knows that products are cheaper to produce in China which is why so many of our products are manufactured there today. BUt one may think that would mean it was cheap for Chinese consumers to purshase as well right? Surprisingly no, it actually costs more for them. This is because the country has a high transportation fee and the government is corrupt, CHina also has a very high tax on their products. But because of the major price differences much of the Chinese population purchases their products while traveling overseas.   

Marissa Roy's curator insight, December 5, 2013 1:37 PM

Although the products we buy from China are cheap for us, it is not necessarily cheap for the ones making it. The tax on goods in China is very expensive. It is also because the government is plagued with corruption, and that is where the taxes come in. It is suprising that many cannot afford the goods they make.

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The role of social networking in the Arab Spring

The role of social networking in the Arab Spring | Scoop it to Evernote APHuG | Scoop.it
A case study for our World Development text book...

 

How useful was digital technology, particularly social networking sites, to democracy protesters in Tunisia and Egypt?  How important are the democracy protests in the Middle East and North Africa to world development?  Social media has fundamentally changed the cultural and political paradigms. 


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Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, November 1, 2014 9:40 PM

While we sit here on Facebook and Twitter for a way to connect with friends, share photos of our vacations or follow our favorite celebrities every move places in North Africa and some of the Middle East are using social media to change their country.  In countries like Tunisia, Libya, and Egypt people have used these social media sites to disperse information to the general public.  Where a rally will be held, a map of where police forces will be located, and what to do in the event teargas is used are all topics for discussion on social media.  With the use of these websites a larger group of people are able to take part in the overthrow of the government.  With leaders restricting the access to the web even more people were intrigued to join the protests.  When people can't follow along on the internet the events they decided to go take part in the events themselves.  With the use of these social media websites the Arab Spring in these areas was able to be as successful as it was.

Kendra King's curator insight, April 27, 2015 5:27 PM

I think it is important that technology plays a role in these revolutions. Before, if a revolution happened, the dictator could just silence its population. Now the population has things like Facebook and Twitter to mobilize their plans of attack for meeting places and advice about how to confront the government. As such, the power of the citizens has grown and according to the article some argue it was this power that made the government officials in Egypt and Tunisia stand down. I tend to agree since the coverage of the event helped increase the size of the demonstrations.  

 

I love that these protests for democracy are being led by the citizens. Since the citizens actually want this type of government, there is actually a chance that this might  be what the country needs. As you mentioned during the Solar Diem video, what works for one society may not translate to another. The author of this piece is more than likely from a western democracy given how the author thinks "democratic change offers the only solution"  to issues like poverty and internal strife within "Arab" countries. Yet, that isn't the case in the Middle East. By forcing a democratic revolution on Iraq,  the region is more destabilized than it was under the harsh command of Saddam Hussein. As you mentioned in class, Iraq needed a dictator like Hussein to keep peace though. So as helpful as technology might be  for democratic revolutions, democratic revolution might not be the answer to every countries problems.

Chris Costa's curator insight, October 26, 2015 2:46 PM

The Arab Spring owes its origins to the mass use of social media websites to get organized and launch the protests that ultimately overthrew several dictators in the region. Social media was crucial for the movement to spread like wild fire, as young people all over North Africa and the Middle East banded together against the tyranny of their governments. Protests broke out in every capital of the region, noticeably in Cairo, where the protests briefly transcended ethnic and religious disputes in the name of freedom for all. Although the movement has long since fizzled out in the face of increased violence, instability, and the lack of a consensus among protesters as to what their next move should be, the Arab Spring served as a powerful example as to extent of which the Internet will now play in global affairs. It is a powerful tool that has completely revolutionized the way we live our everyday lives, and it has completely changed the game for much of North Africa and the Middle East.

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World's Most Amazing Bridges

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Geography is not just about natural landforms. Urban structures are also equally fascinating. For today, let's...

 

The discipline of geography is about making the connections, bridging the gaps between various facets of Earth.  These 15 iconic landscapes play a strong role in how people remember place...gorgeous pictures.


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Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 19, 2013 9:34 AM

This article is interesting because it talks about considering bridges as landforms. Although bridges are not natural landforms they are indeed man made landforms. The appreciation for bridges come from the means that they provide as well as their beautiful structure. The bridges a lone form their design allow people to connect and interact with one another so bridges are also viewed as a tool for connect people as well.

Jason Schneider's curator insight, January 29, 2015 12:42 AM

It's really interesting that the Brooklyn Bridge is number 1. Being a former New-Yorker myself, I am fascinated by the old-fashioned looking structure of the Brooklyn Bridge. This bridge has a cable wire web-looking pattern that helps hold the bridge together and before the 1950s and it use to be useful for trains and streetcars. Now, it not only looks great but it's very useful because it allows six lanes of cars, a walkway for pedestrians and a couple of bike lanes for bikers. All of them make their way from Brooklyn to New York City and back.
This is a photo I took of the Brooklyn bridge towards Manhattan.

https://www.facebook.com/JaJoSchneiderPhoto/photos/pb.579649308750192.-2207520000.1422509199./698888010159654/?type=3&theater

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Tracking Santa with geospatial technology?

Visit www.noradsanta.org for more holiday geo-cheer. 


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Food, Nutrition and Geography

Peter Menzel's beautiful photography and our Hungry Planet...

 

This video is a fascinating portal into global food systems and how globalization is impacting local foods.  He traveled around the world to see what families eat in a given week, and how much all the food cost and where it can from.  Many wealthy countries exhibit poor nutritional habits (eating food high in fat, sugar and salt) while some in poorer people have a very balanced diet.  This leads him to describe the 'Nutritional Transition.'  Warning before showing in class: there are brief instances of non-sexualized nudity in the video. 


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The City Solution - Pictures, More From National Geographic Magazine

The City Solution - Pictures, More From National Geographic Magazine | Scoop it to Evernote APHuG | Scoop.it
Why cities are the best cure for our planet's growing pains...

 

Debate the merits of this quote from Edward Glaeser: "There's no such thing as a poor urbanized country; there's no such thing as a rich rural country."  Is this true?  Are there exceptions?  What explains these geographic patterns?  Is there a causal link between urbanization and economic development? 


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Asians in the U.S. labor force, 2008–2010

Asians in the U.S. labor force, 2008–2010 | Scoop it to Evernote APHuG | Scoop.it
The Editor's Desk: U.S.Bureau of Labor Statistics...

 

Ethnic geography, migration and economic geography intersect in this compelling infographic. 


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Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 19, 2013 9:56 AM

This chart shows the labor force from 2008 to 2010. It what kind of races were active in the labor force and the percentage the race made up of the labor force. It also shows what kind of work they did and how much of the percentage of that race was involved in a specific line of work.

Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, March 21, 2015 10:57 PM

Migration refers to the movement of people across borders. This graph/article illustrates the large amount of Asians migrating to the United States, and joining the work force. The graph further breaks down the "Asians" by specific origin and ethnicity, showing that Chinese Asians are the most prominent in the US workforce. 

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Where in the World? A Google Earth Puzzle

Where in the World? A Google Earth Puzzle | Scoop it to Evernote APHuG | Scoop.it
I've posted one of these before, but this Google Earth puzzle comes with multiple choice options and instant feedback. Looking at the world via Google Earth offers striking images of the diversity of our planet and the impact that humans have had on it. This multiple-choice puzzle based on 25 Google Earth images is part 2 of a series (part 1 doesn't have the multiple choice options).
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NCGE: Weekly Bell-Ringers

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NCGE now offers weekly “Bell-Ringers” or daily questions for your AP classes delivered to your inbox. To receive this member benefit, click the button below. You will be directed to the NCGE online store. Click on "APHG Bell-Ringers" in the Featured Products section. You will be directed to the members log-in page. Once logged in, you will proceed to the "check-out" to complete your registration. Non-members, please purchase the appropriate membership. Once your payment has been accepted, you will be able to register for the bell-ringers.
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