Science, Technology, Ethics: The Euthanasia Debate
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Science, Technology, Ethics: The Euthanasia Debate
Relevant articles, websites, and multimedia on the euthanasia debate.
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Trying to get to the heart of Jack Kevorkian

Trying to get to the heart of Jack Kevorkian | Science, Technology, Ethics: The Euthanasia Debate | Scoop.it
At the crux of the lingering debate over Dr. Jack Kevorkian is an unresolved question of character: What kind of guy would devote his life to helping other people die? Was he a compassionate...
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Euthanasia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Euthanasia (from the Greek: εὐθανασία meaning "good death": εὖ, eu (well or good) + θάνατος, thanatos (death)) refers to the practice of intentionally ending a life in order to relieve pain and suffering.

There are different euthanasia laws in each country. The British House of Lords Select Committee on Medical Ethics defines euthanasia as "a deliberate intervention undertaken with the express intention of ending a life, to relieve intractable suffering".[1] In the Netherlands, euthanasia is understood as "termination of life by a doctor at the request of a patient".[2]

Euthanasia is categorized in different ways, which include voluntary, non-voluntary, or involuntary. Voluntary euthanasia is legal in some countries and U.S. states. Non-voluntary euthanasia is illegal in all countries. Involuntary euthanasia is usually considered murder.[3]

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Non-terminal Euthanasia in Belgium

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Perfectly relevant to what we want to talk about... In non-terminal cases, should euthanasia be legal?

 

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Euthanasia Coaster - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Euthanasia Coaster is an art concept for a steel roller coaster designed to kill its passengers.[1] In 2010, it was designed and made into a scale model by Julijonas Urbonas, a PhD candidate at the Royal College of Art in London. Urbonas, who has worked at an amusement park, stated that the goal of his concept roller coaster is to take lives "with elegance and euphoria".[2] As for practical applications of his design, Urbonas mentioned "euthanasia" or "execution".[3] John Allen, who served as president of the Philadelphia Toboggan Company, inspired Urbonas with his description of the ideal roller coaster as one that "sends out 24 people and they all come back dead".[4] As a hypothetical means of euthanasia, the design led to concern from anti-euthanasia association Care Not Killing.[5]

The design begins with a steep-angled lift to the 510-metre (1,670 ft) (0.317 mile) top, which would take two minutes for the 24-passenger train to reach.[1] From there, a 500-metre (1,600 ft) drop would take the train to 360 kilometres per hour (220 mph), close to its terminal velocity, before flattening out and speeding into the first of its seven slightly clothoid inversions.[3] Each inversion would have a smaller diameter than the one before in order to maintain 10 g to passengers while the train loses speed. After a sharp right-hand turn the train would enter a straight, where unloading of corpses and loading of new passengers could take place.[3]

The Euthanasia Coaster would kill its passengers through prolonged cerebral hypoxia, or insufficient supply of oxygen to the brain.[1] The ride's seven inversions would inflict 10 g on its passengers for 60 seconds – causing g-force related symptoms starting with gray out through tunnel vision to black out and eventually g-LOC (g-force induced loss of consciousness).[3] Depending on the tolerance of an individual passenger to g-forces, the first or second inversion would cause cerebral anoxia, rendering the passengers brain dead.[citation needed] Subsequent inversions would serve as insurance against unintentional survival of particularly robust passengers.[3]

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