Science Wow Factor
789 views | +0 today
Science Wow Factor
Science that I find really interesting to know about
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Sheri Fresonke Harper
Scoop.it!

L'exode rural laisse les campagnes d'Amazonie en proie aux flammes

L'exode rural laisse les campagnes d'Amazonie en proie aux flammes | Science Wow Factor | Scoop.it

Au cours des dernières décennies, le bassin amazonien a vu sa forêt se morceler, colonisée par de nouvelles populations qui ont créé un patchwork de fermes, de pâturages et de forêts secondaires. Aujourd'hui la situation s'est inversée du fait de l'attrait des villes dynamiques d'Amazonie. Une étude récente montre que les zones rurales se dépeuplent, que les réseaux routiers s'étendent et que la sécheresse sévit, favorisant des incendies de plus en plus fréquents et importants, qui ravagent des zones entières. L'étude, qui porte plus spécialement sur l'Amazonie péruvienne, confirme qu'entre autres facteurs, les nouvelles formes d'occupation du territoire ainsi, peut-être que le réchauffement climatique, se traduisent par des incendies de plus en plus destructeurs un peu partout dans le monde.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sheri Fresonke Harper
Scoop.it!

Newfound Comet May Smash Into Neighboring Planet

Newfound Comet May Smash Into Neighboring Planet | Science Wow Factor | Scoop.it
By: Joe Rao Published: 03/05/2013 07:37 AM EST on SPACE.com A newfound comet is apparently on course to have an exceedingly close call with the planet Mars in October 2014, and there is a chance — albeit small — that the comet may even collide with...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sheri Fresonke Harper
Scoop.it!

Mars Mission Marks Milestone in India's Space Program , 6 March 2013

Mars Mission Marks Milestone in India's Space Program , 6 March 2013 | Science Wow Factor | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sheri Fresonke Harper
Scoop.it!

Mars trip to use astronaut poo as radiation shield - space - 01 March 2013 - New Scientist

Mars trip to use astronaut poo as radiation shield - space - 01 March 2013 - New Scientist | Science Wow Factor | Scoop.it
To protect themselves from cosmic rays the couple aboard the proposed Inspiration mission to Mars will line the craft's walls with water, food – and their
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sheri Fresonke Harper from Curiosity Mars Mission
Scoop.it!

NASA Curiosity rover digs Mars, finds sulfur, chlorine and organic ...

NASA Curiosity rover digs Mars, finds sulfur, chlorine and organic ... | Science Wow Factor | Scoop.it
Since NASA's Curiosity rover made its way to Mars, it's been sending back a wealth of data from our rust-colored planetary neighbor: landscape photos,...

Via C.S. Stone
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sheri Fresonke Harper from MARS, the red planet
Scoop.it!

On a mission to Mars via the power of the sun - Telegraph

On a mission to Mars via the power of the sun - Telegraph | Science Wow Factor | Scoop.it
Elon Musk built PayPal and now aims to revolutionise travel on Earth and in space, he tells Ben Oliver

Via pvanhouts
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sheri Fresonke Harper from Anthropology, Archaeology, and History
Scoop.it!

Grotesque Mummy Head Reveals Advanced Medieval Science

Grotesque Mummy Head Reveals Advanced Medieval Science | Science Wow Factor | Scoop.it
An anatomical specimen is the oldest known in Europe.

Via Wednesday Thursday Friday
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sheri Fresonke Harper from Anthropology and Archaeology
Scoop.it!

Longer time scale for human evolution (Hawks 2012)

Longer time scale for human evolution (Hawks 2012) | Science Wow Factor | Scoop.it

Scally and Durbin published a recent review on the implications of a slower human autosomal mutation rate, and now John Hawks has a commentary on the same topic in PNAS (pdf; paywall). He goes through a lot of the evidence of early fossil hominins and ape and mentions several examples that harmonize with the slower mutation rate. As expected, he also finds a better agreement of the slow mutation rate with the evidence for Neandertals where 530,000 year old finds from Atapuerca show signs of belonging to the Neandertal lineage, a date that is inconsistent with a late divergence of modern humans and Neandertals. Finally, he has this to say about modern humans:


Via David Connolly, Kyle Kunkel O'Connor
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sheri Fresonke Harper from Anthropology and Archaeology
Scoop.it!

Burial practices in Neanderthals? : Past Horizons Archaeology

Burial practices in Neanderthals? : Past Horizons Archaeology | Science Wow Factor | Scoop.it

For decades the debate on the familial similarity of humans and Neanderthals has continued back and forth despite DNA evidence showing potential sub-species status. Their classification as human or otherwise determines whether they fall into the category of mortuary archaeology, the study of human funerary sites in the past. So far, it has been questionable whether or not Neanderthals showed the symbolic capacity necessary for the funerary behaviour displayed by humans. However, regardless of whether they are a sub-species or distinct species, new evidence is emerging which supports the idea that Neanderthals may have engaged in patterned mortuary behaviour.


Via Kyle Kunkel O'Connor
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sheri Fresonke Harper from HeritageDaily Archaeology News
Scoop.it!

The Archaeology News Network: 800-year-old skeletons of 12 children and adults unearthered in Mexico

The Archaeology News Network: 800-year-old skeletons of 12 children and adults unearthered in Mexico | Science Wow Factor | Scoop.it

Via Markus Milligan
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sheri Fresonke Harper from Archaeology Tools
Scoop.it!

On this day: Mungo Man fossil found

On this day: Mungo Man fossil found | Science Wow Factor | Scoop.it

ON FEBRUARY 26, 1974, a young geologist managed to stretch Australian history by 20,000-odd years when he found 40,000-year-old human remains buried in a dry lake bed in south-western New South Wales.

The discovery, made in the midst of the Aboriginal rights movement – which would quickly intergrate the findings into its slogans – would later double the time that Australia's first humans were thought to have arrived on the continent.

Jim Bowler, now in his 80s, and an Honorary Professor at the University of Melbourne, was with the Australian National University when he came across the remains at Lake Mungo, about 700 km west of Sydney.


Via David Connolly
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sheri Fresonke Harper from Archaeology News
Scoop.it!

Refugia and Ice Age evolution : Archaeology News from Past Horizons

Refugia and Ice Age evolution : Archaeology News from Past Horizons | Science Wow Factor | Scoop.it

Although the most drastic evolutionary changes occur over long spans of time, the effects of these changes can be seen relatively recently, argues Dr John Stewart, a Senior Lecturer in Palaeoenvironmental Reconstruction & Environmental Change at Bournemouth University.


Via David Connolly
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sheri Fresonke Harper from future power generation
Scoop.it!

How Green Is My Electric Vehicle? - Energy Tribune

How Green Is My Electric Vehicle? - Energy Tribune | Science Wow Factor | Scoop.it
Energy TribuneHow Green Is My Electric Vehicle?

Via Lucas Wyrsch
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sheri Fresonke Harper
Scoop.it!

NASA - NASA Mission Helps Craft 3-D Image Of Buried Mars Flood Channels

NASA - NASA Mission Helps Craft 3-D Image Of Buried Mars Flood Channels | Science Wow Factor | Scoop.it
NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) has provided images allowing scientists for the first time to create a 3-D reconstruction of ancient water channels below the Martian surface.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sheri Fresonke Harper
Scoop.it!

Radar reveals apparent buried channels on Mars

Radar reveals apparent buried channels on Mars | Science Wow Factor | Scoop.it
LOS ANGELES (AP) — The face of Mars is dotted with a maze of channels, pointing to possible ancient megaflood episodes.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sheri Fresonke Harper
Scoop.it!

Mars rover Curiosity to sleep through solar storm

Mars rover Curiosity to sleep through solar storm | Science Wow Factor | Scoop.it
The Mars rover Curiosity was powered down Wednesday in preparation for a solar-storm pounding. It's about time there was some real drama in the story of the little rover that could.  If this were a...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sheri Fresonke Harper from The NewSpace Daily
Scoop.it!

Serious Intent About 2018 Human Mars Mission

Serious Intent About 2018 Human Mars Mission | Science Wow Factor | Scoop.it

If Dennis Tito has his way, when NASA launches a stripped-down version of the robotic Mars Curiosity rover toward the red planet in 2020, a middle-aged married couple with good mechanical skills and “resilient” personalities will be offering first-hand commentary to reporters at Cape Canaveral on what the planet looks like from 100 mi. up.

 

Even if the Inspiration Mars Foundation that Tito is bankrolling for two years from his own deep pockets never gets its human Mars-flyby mission off the ground, the world's first space tourist believes it will have given the U.S. space endeavor a much-needed boost. Benefits will accrue via technical data for future attempts, possible medical breakthroughs needed for deep-space travel and, yes, inspiration.

 

“You reach an age where you say 'OK, it's put up or shut up,'” says Tito, 72. “You've been successful. Now, what are you going to leave behind? What are you going to leave behind to your kids [and] to society? I have five grandsons. Should I leave them all my money, or should I do something like this.”

 

 


Via Stratocumulus
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sheri Fresonke Harper from The sound of Mars
Scoop.it!

I'm Sending Four People to Mars for the Rest of Their lifes

I'm Sending Four People to Mars for the Rest of Their lifes | Science Wow Factor | Scoop.it

Space travel has always been tainted with a few big, unavoidable problems for me. The first is that I spent all three years of my university career occasionally learning what Foucault thinks about reality television, rather than anything vaguely scientific that would teach me how to launch myself through earth's atmosphere without dying immediately. The second is that everything is just so staggeringly, unfathomably far away. The half hour commute to work is bad enough; three days to get to a pretty nondescript floating hunk of rock just seems pointless and like a massive waste of time that could be spent not crowded up in a little shuttle hurtling through the sky.

Although, I suppose if there was an exciting prospect at the end of the journey I wouldn't mind so much. Like a new, ready-made home for me to spend the rest of my years, for example. Dutch entrepreneur Bas Lansdorp is going to be furnishing those exact dreams with his Mars One project, which aims to build a liveable settlement on Mars, before sending four humans to live there for the rest of their lives in 2023, followed by more batches of people as the years go on, living there for the REST of their lives.

Besides that minor detail, his project is remarkable in that it aims to raise the majority of its funding through creating the biggest media spectacle the world has ever known – covering every stage of the project and allowing viewers to vote on who gets to take the trip – rather than relying on governments and having to deal with any kind of political interference. I met Bas for a drink to talk about his plans.


Via v.kaploun
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sheri Fresonke Harper
Scoop.it!

Giant camel fossil found in Arctic

Giant camel fossil found in Arctic | Science Wow Factor | Scoop.it
The fossilised remains of a giant species of camel have been unearthed in Canada's High Arctic.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sheri Fresonke Harper from Anthropology and Archaeology
Scoop.it!

PLOS ONE: A Pre-Hispanic Head

PLOS ONE: A Pre-Hispanic Head | Science Wow Factor | Scoop.it

his report on a male head revealed biologic rhythms, as gleaned from hydrogen isotope ratios in hair, consistent with a South-American origin and Atomic Mass Spectrometry radiocarbon dating (AMS) compatible with the last pre-Hispanic period (1418–1491 AD, 95.4% probability). Biopsies showed exceptionally well-preserved tissues. The hair contained high levels of toxic elements (lead, arsenic and mercury) incompatible with life. There was no evidence for lead deposition in bone consistent with post-mortem accumulation of this toxic element in the hair. We propose that the high content of metals in hair was the result of metabolic activity of bacteria leading to metal complexation in extra cellular polymeric substances (EPS). This is a recognized protective mechanism for bacteria that thrive in toxic environments. This mechanism may account for the tissues preservation and gives a hint at soil composition where the head was presumably buried. Our results have implications for forensic toxicology which has, hitherto, relied on hair analyses as one means to reconstruct pre-mortem metabolism and for detecting toxic elements accumulated during life. Our finding also has implications for other archaeological specimens where similar circumstances may distort the results of toxicological studies.


Via David Connolly, Kyle Kunkel O'Connor
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sheri Fresonke Harper from Anthropology and Archaeology
Scoop.it!

Unreported Heritage News: Did Peking Man wield a spear? New research suggests early humans were assembling weapons in China 700,000 years ago

Unreported Heritage News: Did Peking Man wield a spear? New research suggests early humans were assembling weapons in China 700,000 years ago | Science Wow Factor | Scoop.it

A team of scientists led by Dr. Chen Shen, of the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto Canada, have been re-examining the tools that Peking Man used. Subjecting them to close microscopic examination the researchers have found that this group of Homo erectus was smarter than we give them credit for.


Via Kyle Kunkel O'Connor
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sheri Fresonke Harper from Archaeology
Scoop.it!

A relative from the Tianyuan Cave: Humans living 40,000 years ago likely related to many present-day Asians and Native Americans

A relative from the Tianyuan Cave: Humans living 40,000 years ago likely related to many present-day Asians and Native Americans | Science Wow Factor | Scoop.it

Ancient DNA has revealed that humans living some 40,000 years ago in the area near Beijing were likely related to many present-day Asians and Native Americans.


Via Rene Nieuwenhuizen
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sheri Fresonke Harper from Archaeology Articles and Books
Scoop.it!

PLOS ONE: New Radiometric Ages for the BH-1 Hominin from Balanica (Serbia): Implications for Understanding the Role of the Balkans in Middle Pleistocene Human Evolution

PLOS ONE: New Radiometric Ages for the BH-1 Hominin from Balanica (Serbia): Implications for Understanding the Role of the Balkans in Middle Pleistocene Human Evolution | Science Wow Factor | Scoop.it

Newly obtained ages, based on electron spin resonance combined with uranium series isotopic analysis, and infrared/post-infrared luminescence dating, provide a minimum age that lies between 397 and 525 ka for the hominin mandible BH-1 from Mala Balanica cave, Serbia.

 

This confirms it as the easternmost hominin specimen in Europe dated to the Middle Pleistocene. Inferences drawn from the morphology of the mandible BH-1 place it outside currently observed variation of European Homo heidelbergensis.

 

The lack of derived Neandertal traits in BH-1 and its contemporary specimens in Southeast Europe, such as Kocabaş, Vasogliano and Ceprano, coupled with Middle Pleistocene synapomorphies, suggests different evolutionary forces acting in the east of the continent where isolation did not play such an important role during glaciations.


Via David Connolly
more...
Usta Tamirci's comment, March 5, 2013 3:51 AM
kombi servisi kombi tamiri kombi bakımı http://www.ustatamirci.com
Rescooped by Sheri Fresonke Harper from Archaeology Tools
Scoop.it!

Archaeologist: Bones found in Turkey are probably those of Cleopatra's half-sister | Science/Technology | NewsObserver.com

Archaeologist: Bones found in Turkey are probably those of Cleopatra's half-sister | Science/Technology | NewsObserver.com | Science Wow Factor | Scoop.it
Long-buried bones and a missing monarch. Add some historical notoriety and modern technology and you have a heck of a captivating, science-driven story.

Via David Connolly
more...
No comment yet.