Science-Videos
12.2K views | +0 today
Science-Videos
Learn Science At Home Through Videos
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

Colloidal Nanocrystal-Based Gels and Aerogels: Material Aspects and Application Perspectives

This Perspective discusses how gels and aerogels manufactured from a variety of metal and semiconductor nanoparticles available in colloidal solutions have recently proven to provide an opportunity to marry the nanoscale world with that of materials of macro dimensions that can be easily manipulated and processed while maintaining the nanoscale properties. The aerogel materials may be further processed in order to achieve improvements in their properties relevant to applications in optical sensing, photovoltaics, LEDs, nonlinear optics, thermoelectrics, and catalysis. This Perspective reviews the young field, lines out some of the synthetical challenges, and touches on application-related aspects.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

ANTS - Nature's Secret Power

They have inhabited our planet for millions of years, and yet no living creature seems more alien to us. Award-winning cameraman Wolfgang Thaler and Bert Hoelldobler, a leading ant authority, bring us face-to-face with the mysterious world of these social insects. Special macro film technology introduces us into the fascinating world of ants as no film did before.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

Video lectures, tutorials, seminars and conferences on Substrate Independent Minds and Memory Downloads

Video lectures, tutorials, seminars and conferences on Substrate Independent Minds and Memory Downloads | Science-Videos | Scoop.it

This video assembly presents the activities of the carboncopies.org non-profit advancing substrate-independent minds, whole brain emulation, mind uploading, neuroprostheses and neural interfaces. The future has just begun!

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald from Tracking the Future
Scoop.it!

Max Tegmark: The Future of Life, a Cosmic Perspective

Max Tegmark, from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Foundational Questions Institute (FQXi), presents a cosmic perspective on the future of life, covering our increasing scientific knowledge, the cosmic background radiation, the ultimate fate of the universe, and what we need to do to ensure the human race's survival and flourishing in the short and long term.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
more...
Roger Ellman's curator insight, June 17, 2013 8:57 AM

I'm going to watch this based on the description of speaker and content  worth try's!

Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

Introduction to BioMEMS and Bionanotechnology: Device Fabrication Methods, DNA and Proteins

4 lectures entitled "An Introduction to BioMEMS and Bionanotechnology". These lectures serve as an introduction to some of the key concepts of bio-chips, biosensors, bioMEMs, and bionanotechnology.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

From Chemical Weapons to Chemotherapy: An Unexpected Journey - Prof. Robert Stockman

From deadly nightshade to eye surgery and truth drugs; from poison gas to pesticides and cancer therapy; from explosives to treatments for heart disease; from natural toxins to new starting points for drug discovery. The unexpected relationship between chemical weapons and medicines will be explored, interspersed with curious parallels drawn from the speaker's 20 years of being a chemist.

Oxford University Scientific Society website: http://users.ox.ac.uk/~science/
OUSS Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/OUSciSoc
Robert Stockman: http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/chemistry/people/robert.stockman

more...
sonia ramos's curator insight, May 13, 2013 4:34 AM

El profesor Dr. Robert Stockman, desde la Sociedad Científica de la Universidad de Oxford y, a través de su canal de youtube OU SciSoc (http://bit.ly/10laYAS) divulga la enorme potencialidad de la química para aplicarse en campos tan radicalmente distintos.


El esfuerzo por parte de científicos de todo el mundo y por Universidades y Centros de Investigación en hacer llegar la ciencia a todos, en divulgación y difusión es admirable y un ejemplo a seguir. En la actualidad quien no sabe es quien no quiere aprender...

Rescooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald from "Biotech and Mol Bio"
Scoop.it!

Video Lecture: Small RNA, The Dark Matter of Genetics - by Professor Sir David Baulcombe

Sir David Baulcombe is one of the world's top scientists whose work identified small RNAs, and he's a nice person as well. He will be a Keynote Speaker at the upcoming UK Plant Sciences Federation meeting in Dundee, Scotland, April 2013, which is sure to be a stimulating meeting http://www.plantsci2013.org.uk/programme/


Via Mary Williams, Ruth Bastow, sonia ramos
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

The Impact of Genomics in the Practice of Medicine

Robert Green, Division of Genetics, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School; Associate Director for Research, Partners HealthCare Center for Personal Medicine

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

Robot ants mimic insect behavior

Scientists have built and tested robotic ants, which they say behave just like a real ant colony.

The robots do not resemble their insect counterparts; they are tiny cubes equipped with two watch motors to power the wheels that enable them to move. But their collective behaviour is remarkably ant-like.

In this clip, lead researcher Dr Simon Garnier from the New Jersey Institute of Technology explains how the robots were designed to mimic the way in which an ant colony navigates.

Just like ants, he explains, the robots "work together" to find their way from A to B - each one leaving a light trail that others follow.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Turning algae into biofuel: A one minute method for biocrude

Converting algae to biofuel could be a sustainable solution to the need for liquid fuel in the United States, according to U-M researchers. Scientists in the chemical engineering department are working to create an effective method for converting the plant, which can be harvested continuously and grown in any water condition.

 

Phil Savage (http://che.engin.umich.edu/people/savage.html) is the Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of Chemical Engineering (http://che.engin.umich.edu/) at the University of Michigan. His research focus is on energy production from renewable resources, developing novel processes for converting biomass hydrogen, methane, and liquid transportation fuels.

 

Savage's ocean-going organism of choice is the green marine micro-alga of the genus Nannochloropsis. To make their one-minute biocrude, Savage and Julia Faeth, a doctoral student in Savage's lab, filled a steel pipe connector with 1.5 milliliters of wet algae, capped it and plunged it into 1,100-degree Fahrenheit sand. The small volume ensured that the algae was heated through, but with only a minute to warm up, the algae's temperature should have just grazed the 550-degree mark before the team pulled the reactor back out. Previously, Savage and his team heated the algae for times ranging from 10 to 90 minutes. They saw their best results, with about half of the algae converted to biocrude, after treating it for 10 to 40 minutes at 570 degrees.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

Cancer Biology 101 [2012]: Thea Tlsty, UCSF Prof. of Pathology explains the biology of cancer

Thea Tlsty, UCSF Professor of Pathology, explains the biology of cancer; that cancer arises primarily through damage to the genetic program of our cells, how this leads to uncontrolled growth and invasion, how cancer intrudes upon and destroys adjacent or distant tissues, and how the inner workings of the cancer cell function. Series: "UCSF Osher Mini Medical School for the Public" [1/2012]

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

NASA: Fiery plasma rain on the surface of the sun

NASA: Fiery plasma rain on the surface of the sun | Science-Videos | Scoop.it

On July 19, 2012, an eruption occurred on the sun that produced all three. A moderately powerful solar flare exploded on the sun's lower right limb, sending out light and radiation. Next came a CME, which shot off to the right out into space. And then, the sun treated viewers to one of its dazzling magnetic displays – a phenomenon known as coronal rain.

 

Over the course of the next day, hot plasma in the corona cooled and condensed along strong magnetic fields in the region. Magnetic fields, themselves, are invisible, but the charged plasma is forced to move along the lines, showing up brightly in the extreme ultraviolet wavelength of 304 Angstroms, which highlights material at a temperature of about 50,000 Kelvin. This plasma acts as a tracer, helping scientists watch the dance of magnetic fields on the sun, outlining the fields as it slowly falls back to the solar surface.

 

The footage in this video was collected by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory's Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument. SDO collected one frame every 12 seconds, and the movie plays at 30 frames per second, so each second in this video corresponds to six minutes of real time. The video covers 12:30 a.m. EDT to 10:00 p.m. EDT on July 19, 2012.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

Quantum Life: How Physics Can Revolutionize Biology

Professor Jim Al-Khalili explores how the mysteries of quantum theory might be observable at the biological level. 

Although many examples can be found in the scientific literature dating back half a century, there is still no widespread acceptance that quantum mechanics -- that baffling yet powerful theory of the subatomic world -- might play an important role in biological processes. Biology is, at its most basic, chemistry, and chemistry is built on the rules of quantum mechanics in the way atoms and molecules behave and fit together. 

As Jim explains, biologists have until recently been dismissive of counter-intuitive aspects of the theory and feel it to be unnecessary, preferring their traditional ball-and-stick models of the molecular structures of life. Likewise, physicists have been reluctant to venture into the messy and complex world of the living cell - why should they when they can test their theories far more cleanly in the controlled environment of the physics lab?

But now, experimental techniques in biology have become so sophisticated that the time is ripe for testing ideas familiar to quantum physicists. Can quantum phenomena in the subatomic world impact the biological level and be present in living cells or processes - from the way proteins fold or genes mutate and the way plants harness light in photosynthesis to the way some birds navigate using the Earth's magnetic field? All appear to utilise what Jim terms "the weirdness of the quantum world".

The discourse explores multiple theories of quantum mechanics, from superposition to quantum tunnelling, and reveals why "the most powerful theory in the whole of science" remains incredibly mysterious. Plus, watch out for a fantastic explanation of the famous double slit experiment. 

Watch this video on the Ri Channel with additional learning materials:
http://bit.ly/X826sE

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

Scientists Reconstruct Brains' Visions Into Digital Video In Historic Experiment

Scientists Reconstruct Brains' Visions Into Digital Video In Historic Experiment | Science-Videos | Scoop.it

UC Berkeley scientists have developed a system to capture visual activity in human brains and reconstruct it as digital video clips. Eventually, this process will allow you to record and reconstruct your own dreams on a computer screen.

 

I just can't believe this is happening for real, but according to Professor Jack Gallant—UC Berkeley neuroscientist and coauthor of the research published today in the journal Current Biology—"this is a major leap toward reconstructing internal imagery. We are opening a window into the movies in our minds."

 

Indeed, it's mindblowing. I'm simultaneously excited and terrified. This is how it works: They used three different subjects for the experiments—incidentally, they were part of the research team because it requires being inside a functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging system for hours at a time. The subjects were exposed to two different groups of Hollywood movie trailers as the fMRI system recorded the brain's blood flow through their brains' visual cortex.

 

The readings were fed into a computer program in which they were divided into three-dimensional pixels units called voxels (volumetric pixels). This process effectively decodes the brain signals generated by moving pictures, connecting the shape and motion information from the movies to specific brain actions. As the sessions progressed, the computer learned more and more about how the visual activity presented on the screen corresponded to the brain activity.

 

After recording this information, another group of clips was used to reconstruct the videos shown to the subjects. The computer analyzed 18 million seconds of random YouTube video, building a database of potential brain activity for each clip. From all these videos, the software picked the one hundred clips that caused a brain activity more similar to the ones the subject watched, combining them into one final movie. Although the resulting video is low resolution and blurry, it clearly matched the actual clips watched by the subjects.

 

Think about those 18 million seconds of random videos as a painter's color palette. A painter sees a red rose in real life and tries to reproduce the color using the different kinds of reds available in his palette, combining them to match what he's seeing. The software is the painter and the 18 million seconds of random video is its color palette. It analyzes how the brain reacts to certain stimuli, compares it to the brain reactions to the 18-million-second palette, and picks what more closely matches those brain reactions. Then it combines the clips into a new one that duplicates what the subject was seeing. Notice that the 18 million seconds of motion video arenot what the subject is seeing. They are random bits used just to compose the brain image.

 

Given a big enough database of video material and enough computing power, the system would be able to re-create any images in your brain.  Right now, the resulting quality is not good, but the potential is enormous. Lead research author—and one of the lab test bunnies—Shinji Nishimoto thinks this is the first step to tap directly into what our brain sees and imagines: "Our natural visual experience is like watching a movie. In order for this technology to have wide applicability, we must understand how the brain processes these dynamic visual experiences".

The brain recorders of the future - Imagine that. Capturing your visual memories, your dreams, the wild ramblings of your imagination into a video that you and others can watch with your own eyes.

This is the first time in history that we have been able to decode brain activity and reconstruct motion pictures in a computer screen. The path that this research opens boggles the mind. It reminds me of Brainstorm, the cult movie in which a group of scientists lead by Christopher Walken develops a machine capable of recording the five senses of a human being and then play them back into the brain itself.

 

This new development brings us closer to that goal which, I have no doubt, will happen at one point. Given the exponential increase in computing power and our understanding of human biology, I think this will arrive sooner than most mortals expect. Perhaps one day you would be able to go to sleep wearing a flexible band labeled Sony Dreamcam around your skull. 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald from Tracking the Future
Scoop.it!

The Rise of Artificial Intelligence | PBS Digital Studios

Artificial intelligence is an ever evolving goal for researchers, and the object of endless fascination for writers, filmmakers, and the general public. But despite our best science fiction visions, creating digital intelligence is incredibly difficult. The universe is a very complicated place, and humans have had millions of years to evolve the ability to navigate and make sense of it. Contemporary attempts to create AI have us looking more at how our own brains work to see how a computer could simulate the core activities that create our intelligence. No matter how we get there, it is certain that artificial intelligence will have tremendous impact on our society and economy, and lead us down a path towards evolving our own definitions of humanity.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald from Stem Cells & Tissue Engineering
Scoop.it!

10 talks on the future of stem cell medicine

10 talks on the future of stem cell medicine | Science-Videos | Scoop.it
Will the next generation think about diseases like Alzheimer’s and diabetes the way we think about polio and the whooping cough? Susan Solomon, the co-founder of the New York Stem Cell Foundation (NYSCF), certainly hopes so.

Via Jacob Blumenthal
more...
Jacob Blumenthal's curator insight, June 27, 2013 4:11 AM

This is a great collection of talks from TED! Highly recommended!

Bettina Ascaino's curator insight, December 15, 2013 12:46 AM

 A collection of TED talks highly recommended by Jacob Blumenthal

Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

Phenomenology of spontaneous wave-function collapse models

Phenomenology of spontaneous wave-function collapse models | Science-Videos | Scoop.it

Models of spontaneous wave function collapse make predictions, which are different from those of standard quantum mechanics. Indeed, these models can be considered as a rival theory, against which the standard theory can be tested, in pretty much the same way in which parametrized post-Newtonian gravitational theories are rival theories of general relativity.  The predictions of collapse models almost coincide with those of standard quantum mechanics at the microscopic level, as these models have to account for the microscopic world, as we know it. Departures become significant when the size of the system increases. However, for larger systems environmental influences become more and more difficult to eliminate. This is the reason why it is tricky to test collapse models experimentally, and so far no decisive test has been performed. We will review the main phenomenological properties of collapse models, in particular the so-called amplification mechanics, as well as the main models, which are debated in the literature (GRW, CSL, QMUPL, DP).  We will review the lower bounds on the collapse parameter, and more importantly the upper bounds set by available experimental data. This data come both from experimental tests on earth, and from cosmological observations.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

Lee Smolin - Ideas about time and a natural selection process of new universes

Time is real, the laws of physics can change and our universe could be involved in a cosmic natural selection process in which new universes are born from black holes, renowned physicist and author Lee Smolin said.

His views are contrary to the widely-accepted model of the universe in which time is an illusion and the laws of physics are fixed, as held by Einstein and many contemporary physicists as well as some ancient philosophers, Prof. Smolin said. Acknowledging that his statements were provocative, he explained how he had come to change his mind about the nature of reality and had moved away from the idea that the assumptions that apply to observations in a laboratory can be extrapolated to the whole universe.

The debate had sometimes taken a metaphysical turn, he said, in which the idea that time is not real had led some to conclude that everything that humans value – such as free will, imagination and agency – is also an illusion. "Is it any wonder that so many people don't buy science? This is what is at stake," he said.

more...
Peter Phillips's curator insight, May 30, 2013 8:16 AM

Imagination is critical to science.

Rescooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald from "Biotech and Mol Bio"
Scoop.it!

Craig Venter: Health, Genomics, Research and Power

Biologist and entrepreneur Craig Venter discusses the intersection between health, genomics, research and power.

 

For the full 46 minute interview go to 

http://fora.tv/2012/10/16/Craig_Venter_Health_Genomics_Research_and_Power

 

More previews of Many other interviews from the October 15-16 Living by Numbers Health Conference by WIRED and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

http://fora.tv/conference/wired_health_conference_living_by_numbers

 

"a new conversation on the future of healthcare with 200 expert leaders from the worlds of medicine, science, technology, and business.

....a clear, compelling argument that today there is a new opportunity to bring data into real-time decision-making for doctors, researchers, hospitals, and individuals. This combination has the potential to transform people's lives.

.....spanning the gap between healthcare and technology, connecting pioneering researchers with ambitious entrepreneurs. First and foremost, .... a forum for ideas. Expect new connections, new opportunities, and new insights in how better data is driving us all toward better health."

 

The full interviews are here:

http://fora.tv/conference/wired_health_conference_living_by_numbers/buy_programs


Via AUNG THIHA, David Gifford, sonia ramos
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Strange Planetary Vistas from Kepler - Harvard Lecture

The study of extrasolar planets has recently entered its heyday with the launch of NASA's Kepler mission. Kepler has found that planetary systems are very common in our galaxy. Along the way, we've been surprised by the diversity of planetary systems, many of which bear little resemblance to our own solar system. Josh Carter presents these most alien of alien worlds, including planets orbiting two suns and a planetary system with two very different planets very close to one another.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

What We Still Don't Know: "Are We Real?" A mind-boggling journey to post-human life

Series from Channel 4 featuring Sir Martin Rees.

 

There is a fundamental chasm in our understanding of ourselves, the universe, and everything. To solve this, Sir Martin takes us on a mind-boggling journey through multiple universes to post-biological life. On the way we learn of the disturbing possibility that we could be the product of someone elses experiment.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald from Tracking the Future
Scoop.it!

Where are the Robots? 2013 Guardian Oxford London Lecture

Professor Paul Newman discusses the present and future state of robotics: asking how the state of the discipline measures up to science fiction, and discussing how Robots can learn to navigate our world, with profound consequences for society 


Via Szabolcs Kósa
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

World's First Macroscopic Invisibility Cloak Based On Ordinary Calcite

World's First Macroscopic Invisibility Cloak Based On Ordinary Calcite | Science-Videos | Scoop.it

Baile Zhang, an assistant professor of physics at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore, has used the light-bending qualities of calcite - a cheap and abundant mineral that is a form of calcium carbonate - to create the first macroscopic invisibility cloak. Zhang originally came up with the technology in 2010. This short video clip is similar to what he recently demonstrated on stage at TED2013. He is placing a piece of calcite over a rolled-up Post-it note submerged in oil, making the pink tube appear to disappear. This research has applications in imaging, communication, and defense.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Scientific Animations Structural Biology Video Channel: ATP synthase structure and mechanism

Scientific Animations Structural Biology Video Channel: ATP synthase structure and mechanism | Science-Videos | Scoop.it
An ATP synthase is a general term for an enzyme that can synthesize adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and inorganic phosphate by utilizing some form of energy.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Scoop.it!

Dr. Don Hearn discusses the cutting edge of optimization and discrete mathematics

Dr. Hearn give an overview of his program - Optimization and Discrete Mathematics at the AFOSR (Air Force) Spring Review 2012. 


• Discusses the cutting edge of optimization
• 25% of all scientific programming is spent on linear programming problems
• metamaterial design
• Describes the value of the travelling salesman problem and how they can take two local optima and make the move the next local optima using non-quantum systems
• Cracking or making a dent on travelling salesman problems means progress on all NP-complete problems.
• Band gap optimization
• photonic materials and crystalline structures
• circuit design
• improve drugs and manufacturing

more...
No comment yet.