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Michio Kaku: Can Nanotechnology Create Utopia?

Dr. Kaku addresses the question of the possibility of utopia, the perfect society that people have tried to create throughout history. These dreams have not been realized because we have scarcity. However, now we have nanotechnology, and with nanotechnology, perhaps, says Dr. Michio Kaku, maybe in 100 years, we'll have something called the replicator, which will create enormous abundance.


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Are We Alone? A New Era in Astronomy is on the Horizon: The NASA James Webb Space Telescope

The Hubble Space Telescope has completely revolutionized our understanding of the universe, and has become a beloved icon of popular culture. As revolutionary as Hubble has been, we have pushed it to its scientific limits in many ways. Hubble’s successor, the James Webb Space Telescope, has been in the works for almost two decades and is scheduled to launch in late 2018. It will be 100 times more powerful than Hubble. In her Perimeter Public Lecture, Dr. Amber Straughn will provide an update on the progress of building the world’s largest-yet space telescope, and will give an overview of the astronomical questions we hope to answer with Webb. These questions get to the heart of what it means to be human: Where did we come from? How did we get here? Are we alone?
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Hidden Structures of the Mandelbrot and Julia Sets

An exploration of the correlations between the Mandelbrot Set and the Julia Sets for z^2 + c. Followed by some flybys of the full Mandelbrot/Julia structures. Finally, an attempt to show the complete 4D Mandelbrot Set.

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Gravitational Waves: A New Era of Astronomy Begins

On September 14th, 2015, a ripple in the fabric of space, created by the violent collision of two distant black holes over a billion years ago, washed across the Earth. As it did, two laser-based detectors, 50 years in the making – one in Louisiana and the other in Washington State – momentarily twitched, confirming a century-old prediction by Albert Einstein and marking the opening of a new era in astronomy. Join some of the very scientists responsible for this most anticipated discovery of our age and see how gravitational waves will be used to explore the universe like never before.

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Let’s Go and Delve into a Black Hole

The Event Horizon Telescope is an experiment that is being performed on a large and ever-increasing array of radio telescopes that span the Earth, from Hawaii to Chile and from the South Pole to Arizona. In April of this year, the EHT collaboration performed its first set of observations with this full array of telescopes in order to take the first ever picture of a black hole. Come hear about how the unprecedented spatial resolution and methods of this experiment will allow us to get up close and personal with the black hole at the center of our Galaxy, Sagittarius A*, and the black hole at the center of the nearby galaxy M87. The ultimate goal is to test Einstein’s theory of General Relativity by looking for its most bizarre prediction: a shadow that is a direct evidence for the event horizon of a black hole!

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125 Great Science Videos: From Astronomy to Physics, Chemistry, Technology and Mathematics

125 Great Science Videos: From Astronomy to Physics, Chemistry, Technology and Mathematics | Science-Videos | Scoop.it
125 Great Science Videos covering Astronomy & Space Travel; Physics; Biology & Chemistry; Environment, Geology and & Ecology; Psychology & Neuroscience; and Technology & Mathematics.
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About the Symmetries of Things

Symmetry is everywhere, from constraining how builders lay brick to guiding physicists as to the nature of reality.

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Public Video Lecture Series of the Hubble Space Telescope [37 video lectures]

Public Video Lecture Series of the Hubble Space Telescope [37 video lectures] | Science-Videos | Scoop.it
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Synthetic Biology: the potential and the problems of re-engineering life

Professor Jamie Davies, Professor of Experimental Anatomy, presents "Synthetic Biology: the potential and the problems of re-engineering life".


Via Szabolcs Kósa
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Strange Planetary Vistas from Kepler - Harvard Lecture

The study of extrasolar planets has recently entered its heyday with the launch of NASA's Kepler mission. Kepler has found that planetary systems are very common in our galaxy. Along the way, we've been surprised by the diversity of planetary systems, many of which bear little resemblance to our own solar system. Josh Carter presents these most alien of alien worlds, including planets orbiting two suns and a planetary system with two very different planets very close to one another.

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Electron Superhighway: A Quantum Leap for Computing

For the past 60 years, progress in information technology has been governed by Moore's law, which states that the number of transistors on a semiconductor chip doubles every 18 months. However, this remarkable trend is drawing to a close, mostly because the electrons that carry current in chips move like cars driving through a crowded marketplace, swerving around obstacles and dissipating too much of their energy as heat. The recent discovery of a new state of matter "the topological insulator" may lead to a new paradigm of information processing, in which electrons moving in opposing directions are separated into well-ordered lanes, like automobiles on a highway. This talk will explain the basic principles behind this amazing discovery.

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Towards a Semantic Language of Mathematics

This film discusses the techniques, and outlines the vision of the future computerization of pure mathematics through interviews and talk segments from renowned mathematicians, meta-mathematicians, computational mathematicians, and theorem provers.

The interviews and talks were conducted at the Sloan Foundation sponsored "Semantic Representation of Mathematical Knowledge Workshop", held at the Fields Institute (Toronto) in February 2016.

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Leonard Susskind: Mysteries of DarkEnergy

Dark energy has a kind of "anti-gravity" effect, causing everything to repel from everything else. This force is inevitable in physicists' equations, but it is many, many, many orders of magnitude smaller than can be explained by standard theories.

 

Enter string theory, which Leonard Susskind and Yoichiro Nambu proposed in 1969. While we observe three dimensions of space and one of time, string theory posits 10 dimensions of space and one of time. The extra dimensions are balled up, or compactified, into dimensions too small to detect but whose structures are important to the laws of physics.

 

Describing compactified dimensions is very complex— to say the least. "We have examples of systems in nature which have thousands of degrees of freedom," Susskind says, citing a molecule made up out of a thousand atoms. "How many energy levels, how many quantum states, does such a molecule have? The answer can be as high as 10^1000 [ten raised to the power of one thousand]— and there are huge, huge numbers of possibilities for the ways the atoms organize themselves. In the same way, there are huge numbers of possibilities for the way that these—they're called compactification manifolds— organize themselves. And because there are so many ways, there are many, many energy levels. For the molecule, there are many, many possible values for the energy, 10^500 [ten raised to the power of five hundred] possible values of the vacuum energy."

 

Dark energy poses great challenges and opportunities in physics and cosmology and may hold the key to the long-sought unification of quantum mechanics and gravity, Susskind says.

"We're largely just beginning to get an overall view of how string theory and [the] incredibly many possibilities that appear to be inherent in it, are changing our view of what's natural, what's possible, what's probable."

 

Do 'pocket universes' exist?

In recent years, some physicists have suggested that rather than having one universe with one set of physical laws, string theory may lay the foundation for the possibility of the existence of innumerable ``pocket universes,`` each with its own landscape of physical laws.

 

"The word 'universe' is obviously not intended to have a plural, but science has evolved in such a way that we need a plural noun for something similar to what we ordinarily call our universe," Susskind explains. "Alan Guth coined the name 'pocket universe,' meaning a pocket of space, a region of space, over which the environment is uniform, the laws of nature are uniform, the constants of nature are uniform, and that these pockets of space are more or less identifiable with the things that we used to call the Universe, with a capital U. So we now need a plural for the concept if we believe that space is filled like a crazy quilt of environments with different properties and different laws of physics."

 

Today, string theory has become a serious controversy even within the physics mainstream. The number of possible energy states—10500 [ten raised to the power of five hundred]—inherent in string theory is "totally unexpected," Susskind says. "There was constantly a sense that there would only be one, or some very small number, of legitimate solutions of the theory. Ed Witten [a physicist famed for his mathematical prowess] worked very hard to show that there was only a very small number, and he failed completely."

 

The dust isn't likely to settle soon. Says Susskind: "More and more as time goes on, the opponents of the idea admit that they are simply in a state of depression and desperation. More and more people are starting to think about this possibility. But it's been a major sea change in the attitudes of theoretical physicists. … It means we have a mathematical framework to think about it. We have a basic set of precise concepts to think about it, and it means that in time we will know the truth."

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Breakthrough in Nuclear Fusion?

Nuclear fusion is the holy grail of energy generation because by fusing two hydrogen atoms together into a single helium atom it releases enormous amounts of energy, yet represents a clean, safe, sustainable and secure form of power.

The most tried and true approach for generating nuclear fusion energy has been a tokamak fusion reactor, which uses very high density magnetic fields to compress and contain a plasma to 100 million degrees. But none has been able to generate more electricity than it consumes. Until now.

Director Whyte will describe the ARC nuclear fusion reactor (shown above right), based on a new superconducting material, for achieving very high density magnetic fields. It will be used as a research center, but could ultimately become a prototype for an inexpensive 200MW power plant, vaulting nuclear fusion from scientific curiosity to potential commercialization.

The ARC reactor is being designed to produce at least 3 times the power required to run it, which has never been done before and is the result of several new technologies which dramatically reduce the size and cost.

The biggest breakthrough is a new superconducting material which produces a much higher magnetic field density, yielding a ten-fold increase in fusion power per volume. Molten salt will be used as a liquid cooling blanket for fast heat transfer and easy maintenance. And 3D printing techniques will allow the fabrication of reactor components in shapes that cannot be made by milling machines. The result is a much smaller, lower cost and highly efficient modular power plant with zero emissions and abundant fuel.

Dennis Whyte, recently promoted to run MIT’s Nuclear Science and Engineering Department and Director of MIT’s Plasma Science & Fusion Center, works in magnetic fusion and specializes in the interface between the plasma and materials.

Dennis received his PhD from the Universite du Quebec in 1993. A Fellow of the American Physical Society, Dennis was awarded the Department of Energy’s Plasma Physics Junior Faculty Award in 2003 and won the International Atomic Energy Agency’s Nuclear Fusion Prize in 2013. He is a two-time winner of the MIT Joel and Ruth Spira Award for teaching excellence. Among his many lectures on fusion energy research, Dennis was an invited speaker at CERAWeek and the National Science Foundation’s Engineering Distinguished Lecturer in 2015.

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Implantable Optoelectronic and Microfluidic Systems for Neuroscience

Professor John Rogers, Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois, discusses how the successful integration of optoelectronic and microfluidic systems with the brain has the potential to accelerate basic scientific discoveries and their translation into clinically relevant technologies. Professor Rogers’ research includes fundamental and applied aspects of materials for unusual electronic and photonic devices, with an emphasis on bio-integrated and bio-inspired systems.

 

https://neuroscience.stanford.edu

 

Part of the Inaugural Symposium of Stanford Neurosciences Institute recorded on October 9, 2014.

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Therapeutic T cell engineering: CD19 CAR therapy and beyond - what does the future hold?

Michel Sadelain, MD, PhD Director, Center for Cell Engineering, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center 2017 Canada Gairdner Research Symposium October 27, 2017
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Superintelligence: Science or Fiction? | Elon Musk & Many Other Great Minds

Elon Musk, Stuart Russell, Ray Kurzweil, Demis Hassabis, Sam Harris, Nick Bostrom, David Chalmers, Bart Selman, and Jaan Tallinn discuss with Max Tegmark (moderator) what likely outcomes might be if we succeed in building human-level AGI, and also what we would like to happen.

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Mathematik für Informatiker (mit Python)

Mathematik für Informatiker (mit Python) | Science-Videos | Scoop.it

Diese Videos sind auf deutsch (engl. German). Also eifrig deutsch lernen oder sich am python code entlang bewegen.

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Stanford Video Lectures: Introduction to Robotics (CS223A)

Stanford Video Lectures: Introduction to Robotics (CS223A) | Science-Videos | Scoop.it

Introduction to Robotics (CS223A) covers topics such as Spatial Descriptions, Forward Kinematics, Inverse Kinematics, Jacobians, Dynamics, Motion Planning and Trajectory Generation, Position and Force Control, and Manipulator Design.

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Entanglement and Complexity: Gravity and Quantum Mechanics

Professor Leonard Susskind describes how gravity and quantum information theory have come together to create a new way of thinking about physical systems
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A New View on Gravity and the Dark Side of the Cosmos

In his public lecture at Perimeter on October 4, 2017, Dr. Erik Verlinde explored the core ideas behind this research into emergent gravity, and examine the implications of this potential revolution in our understanding of the universe.

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Mass Extinctions: A Brief History Of Life's Worst Moments on Earth

Life on Earth has experienced at least five major events we call “mass extinctions,” during which a huge number of species have gone extinct in a short period of time. Paleontologist Phoebe Cohen explores how scientists decide which extinctions get to be considered “mass,” the ways in which these events have reshaped life as we know it, and how a deep understanding of past extinctions can help us see the future.

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Secrets of the Fibonacci Sequence and the Phi Vortex Based Mathematics Torus Array

Video Source - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kxuU8jYkA1k Music by Simon Mathewson.

 

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THE NEXT STEP IN THE SEARCH FOR HABITABLE PLANETS - NASA SCIENCE LECTURE

The Kepler Space Telescope was incredibly successful in its mission to search out and identify planets around other stars. But what comes next? A researcher from NASA Ames shares his work to develop new direct imaging technologies to study exoplanets in greater detail and discover habitable worlds outside of our solar system.
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