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Characteristics of Jordan K-12 Education System

I made a lecture intitled Characteristics of Jordan K-12 Education System for the Fulbright Hays Delegation of Teachers in Collaboration with University of Pit…
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The Mysterious Black Stone of Kaaba - Worship of a Meteorite?

The Mysterious Black Stone of Kaaba - Worship of a Meteorite? | Science, Technology & Innovation | Scoop.it
Red Ice Creations
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Continuum from previous post!

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Using mobile phones in data collection: Opportunities, issues and challenges

Using mobile phones in data collection: Opportunities, issues and challenges | Science, Technology & Innovation | Scoop.it
The explosive growth in the availability of mobile phones in societies around the world – even in some of the poorest, most remote communities – is increasingly leading many groups to explore how these devices might be used effectively as part of large scale data collection efforts in many sectors, including education. Utilizing small, portable electronic computing devices to help collect data is not new, of course. For over two decades, laptop computers and personal digital assistants (PDAs) have featured in initiatives to (e.g.) collect census information, interview consumers of various goods and services and poll potential voters. That said, such efforts often faced constraints related to, among other things: costs; the relative novelty of such devices among key segments of the population; the need to provide device-specific user training; and difficulties in exchanging data between these devices and other components of a larger system for data collection. If, as it has been argued, the best technology is often the one you already have, know how to use, can maintain and can afford, for most of the world, the mobile phone fits these criteria quite well. As of late 2013, rates of mobile phone penetration stood at 96% globally (128% in developed countries and 89% in developing countries). According to the International Telecommunications Union, “today there are almost as many almost as many mobile-cellular subscriptions as there are people in the world.”    Given their ubiquity, increasing functionalities, and decreasing related acquisition and operating costs, it is not surprising that mobile phones have been employed in a variety of ways to aid data collection efforts around the world. While many people may believe that such efforts require the use of a high-end (and expensive) smart phones, phones of all sorts have been deployed successful to different ends in different contexts. Very simple, low-end ‘dumb phones’, for example, can utilize simple text messaging (or SMS) or voice to (e.g.) send out short queries by phone to a bank of phone numbers, prompting users to reply with a short response, which can be either predefined (‘text 1 for yes, 2 for no’)  or open-ended. Smartphones can be used in much more sophisticated ways by presenting rich media survey questions directly to respondents or to help guide the actions of an ‘enumerator’ (someone who administers a survey in person) by presenting a user-friendly interface to help an enumerator input and transmit data in structured ways. Such phones may also contain help files and training aids for the enumerators. In between the high and low end, ‘feature phones’ (a catch-all category of sorts for phones which can do more than make basic voice calls and send and received text messages, but do not have the advanced functionality of smart phones) can make use of simple graphical forms (e.g) on screen as prompts for questions, and can store/transmit structured data as a result of responses. Data input or captured into phones may be transmitted or shared in many ways (including SMS, MMS, USSD, Bluetooth, wireless Internet, or the exchange of physical memory cards). Where mobile connectivity is not available, data can be stored on the phone and transmitted later once a phone is within sufficient range of a cell tower.   How and why might mobile phones be useful in large-scale data collection efforts, and what comparative advantages might their use have when compared to other options?   A number of attributes and characteristics of mobile phone use in such activities (as well as the use of other small, low-cost portable devices such as tablets, especially where such devices can be connected to mobile and wireless networks) may lead them to be considered, especially when compared with the use of more traditional, paper-based survey instruments:  
Khitam A Al-Utaibi's insight:

The best technology is often the one you already have, know how to use, can maintain and can afford,

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Double Time - White House Film Festival Submission - YouTube

A short film for the White House Film Festival about two students across the globe collaborating on a school project, showing uses of Technology in the Class...

Via iEARN-USA
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#iearn #filmfestival

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Steve Job a Renaissance humanist polymath? Why there is a dearth of modern day Renaissance humanist polymaths?

Steve Job a Renaissance humanist polymath? Why there is a dearth of modern day Renaissance humanist polymaths? | Science, Technology & Innovation | Scoop.it

''Here is the truth - actual heroism receives no ovation, entertains no one. No one queues up to see it. No one is interested."

 

Sum total of passion, zest, zeal challenge, getting best out of people and creativity is what a global renaissance man is all about. That is what Steve Job was; a ''Renaissance universal man."

 

Steve Job was a man for all seasons! "Renaissance Man" is described by Leone Battista Alberti as "a man can do all things if he will." He was an, an Italian painter, poet, linguist, philosopher and cryptographer.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen, Lynnette Van Dyke
Khitam A Al-Utaibi's insight:
Renaissance Humanist Polymaths!
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, February 7, 2014 6:34 PM

I think we find it easier to be an expert and live in that mindset than having a beginner's mind where there are many possibilities. It could be the pace of our world or just the way contemporary humans have evolved. Whatever the case, it is sad.

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Collaboration in innovation

Collaboration in innovation | Science, Technology & Innovation | Scoop.it
The thrill of discovery just isn’t the same when you’re alone. That’s one of the myriad reasons why collaboration is central to research at Harvard. Here, ...
Khitam A Al-Utaibi's insight:

Collaboration and innovation are two faces for the same coin!

#innovation #collaboration 

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Transplant of human gut bacteria could help make an obese person thin, study suggests

Transplant of human gut bacteria could help make an obese person thin, study suggests | Science, Technology & Innovation | Scoop.it

The microorganisms in the human gut appear to play a pivotal role in determining whether a person is lean or obese, new research shows.

 

The study, published in Science, is the strongest evidence yet that what’s inside an individual’s digestive tract influences the risk of obesity and its related health problems, such as Type 2 diabetes. The work helps explain the nation’s 30-year run-up in excess weight—and it may supply a potential solution to the resulting epidemic, experts said.

 

“Many factors contribute to obesity,” said the study’s senior author, Dr. Jeffrey I. Gordon, director of the Center for Genome Sciences and Systems Biology at Washington University, St. Louis. For people whose gut organisms are not equipped to fight obesity, it may be possible to “add microbes to fill the vacancies” needed to keep a person lean and healthy, he said.

 

Gordon and a multinational group of scientists sought to isolate the gut microbiome’s effect on obesity from better-known influences such as genes, diet and exercise.

 

They recruited four sets of identical female twins in which one twin was lean and the other obese. Through stool samples, the researchers gathered a representative collection of the bacteria, viruses and protozoans flourishing in each woman’s gut. They transplanted that microscopic zoo into a large group of mice whose intestines were essentially a blank slate.

 

Almost immediately, the mix of living organisms inside a mouse’s digestive tract began to resemble the one inside its human donor. Soon the mice came to resemble more and more the women whose gut microbiomes they had adopted.

 

Despite eating about the same amount of the same low-fat chow, mice that got transplants from an obese twin began to gain weight and lay down fat deposits. The mice that got transplants from a lean twin remained lean.

The intestinal flora of the lean mice also worked better at breaking down and fermenting dietary sugars than did their counterparts in the obese mice. In the mice that got transplants from a lean twin, undigestible starches passed through the digestive system more speedily, resulting in thinner mice.

 

“It was a very, very clear, elegant, well-thought-out study,” said Dr. Lawrence J. Brandt, a gastroenterologist at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City who wasn’t involved in the research. By stripping out the effects of genes and diet, the experiment helps refine experts’ understanding of the specific ways that the gut’s living organisms influence a complex phenomenon like weight gain, he said.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Khitam A Al-Utaibi's insight:

Wonderful news, and great if it happens ASAP!

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Dorothy M Neddermeyer, PhD's comment, September 9, 2013 1:37 PM
Steve: Thanks for sharing your wisdom.
Dorothy M Neddermeyer, PhD's comment, September 9, 2013 6:34 PM
It is not only interesting, it is a powerful health remedy. This not new news Holistic Health Care practices are based on microorganisms in the human gut.
Dorothy M Neddermeyer, PhD's comment, September 9, 2013 7:38 PM
Ellen: No pun intended, right? Gut instinct is far more effective when the gut flora is healthy. We live in a world where everything is connected to everything else. Everything we do, say, think and believe affects--Mind, Body and Spirit, others and the universe.
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How the Internet of things could transform the enterprise

How the Internet of things could transform the enterprise | Science, Technology & Innovation | Scoop.it
It’s an exciting time to be in enterprise tech: We’re seeing tablets go from video streaming screens at home to salesforce-enabling tools in the enterprise. Meanwhile, wearables like Google Glass a...
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عالم مصرى: ناسا اكتشفت ليلة القدرمن10سنوات

عالم مصرى: ناسا اكتشفت ليلة القدرمن10سنوات | Science, Technology & Innovation | Scoop.it
قال الدكتور عبد الباسط محمد السيد، رئيس المجمع العلمي لهيئة الإعجاز العلمي في القرآن الكريم والسنة بمصر، إن أغنياء العرب
Khitam A Al-Utaibi's insight:

 دليل العلماء والدارسين والباحثين الذي لا ينضب :إنه القرآن الكريم 

 

Holy Quran is The Guide to scientists, scholars and researchers that is the Inexhaustible resource

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Timeline Photos - Al-Utaibi Khitam A | Facebook

Timeline Photos - Al-Utaibi Khitam A | Facebook | Science, Technology & Innovation | Scoop.it
ماذا تعرف عن #التعلم المبني على #المشروع؟
هل ترغب بتوأمة صفك مع صفوف أخرى حول #العالم؟

بإمكانك ذلك من خلال الالتحاق ببرنامج آي إيرن/#iEARN الذي يقدم...
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Manufacturing Innovation Institutes: Putting America at the Forefront of 21st Century Manufacturing | The White House

Manufacturing Innovation Institutes: Putting America at the Forefront of 21st Century Manufacturing | The White House | Science, Technology & Innovation | Scoop.it
President Obama announces two new public-private manufacturing innovation institutes – one in Chicago and one in the Detroit area -- as well as a competition for the first of four additional manufacturing innovation institutes.
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President Barack Obama delivers remarks announcing two new public-private Manufacturing Innovation Institutes, and launches the first of four new Manufacturing Innovation Institute Competitions, in the East Room of the White House, Feb. 25, 2014. (Official White House Photo by Lawrence Jackson)

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11 Things You Need to Immediately Stop Doing on Facebook

11 Things You Need to Immediately Stop Doing on Facebook | Science, Technology & Innovation | Scoop.it
Are you getting tired of Facebook or some of the behavior of your friends on the site? Facebook is the most popular social network with over 1 billion active users. And with great popularity comes ...
Khitam A Al-Utaibi's insight:

Amazing commands to protect yourself on facebook!

 

#facebook #nottodo

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Toshiba has invented a quantum cryptography network that even the NSA can’t hack

Toshiba has invented a quantum cryptography network that even the NSA can’t hack | Science, Technology & Innovation | Scoop.it
If you've got communications that absolutely cannot be intercepted—whether you're a NSA whistleblower, the president of Mexico, or Coca-Cola—quantum cryptography is the way to go.
Khitam A Al-Utaibi's insight:

Can I own as means to stop SOPA ?

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