Science Project
2 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Eileen Zhang
Scoop.it!

First snow leopard caught on NABU camera in Kyrgyzstan | BirdLife

First snow leopard caught on NABU camera in Kyrgyzstan | BirdLife | Science Project | Scoop.it
Eileen Zhang's insight:

-experts estimate that there are about 4,080 to 6,590 snow leopards that roam across an enormous area of 2 million square kilometres in Central Asia.

-In the mid-1980s, between 1,200 and 1,400 animals still lived in Kyrgyzstan, at that time a large part of the world’s snow leopard population. Today, however, there are only approximately 200 to 300. 

-At the invitation of Kyrgyz president Almasbek Atambajew, representatives of all twelve states to which the snow leopard is native, will come together for the first time. “The aim is to exchange experiences in the protection of snow leopards and to agree on an international, binding conservation plan”, Tennhardt said.

-this international conference will hopefully contribute to saving the species from extinction.

-“Even though there are laws to protect the snow leopard, many animals still fall victim to poachers”

-“The cameras will help us observe snow leopards in the wild and to track the animals. In the long run, this will allow us to provide a more precise estimate of their overall population size”

-NABU has been committed to the protection of snow leopards in Kyrgyzstan since the early 1990s.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Eileen Zhang
Scoop.it!

The dying roar: endangered Snow Leopards of Pakistan - gulfnews.com

The dying roar: endangered Snow Leopards of Pakistan - gulfnews.com | Science Project | Scoop.it
The dying roar: endangered Snow Leopards of Pakistan gulfnews.com The thing to understand is that snow leopard conservation efforts can only succeed when local populations in the habitat are actively engaged, involved and are made to commit to this...
Eileen Zhang's insight:

-Snow Leopard Foundation was registered back in 2005. In their limited resources they have done a tremendous job to save the Snow Leopards and other endangered cats in Pakistan.

-In 2006 when we collared a female Snow Leopard to trace the locations where she moves, we were surprised that during the 14-months she wore the collar, the snow leopard, nicknamed Bayad-e-Kohsaar (In the Memory of Mountains), travelled an area of 1,563 kilometres, sharing her time between Pakistan and Afghanistan, summer and winter, respectively. 

-The thing to understand is that snow leopard conservation efforts can only succeed when local populations in the habitat are actively engaged, involved and are made to commit to this cause. 

-The best estimate of global snow leopard population is 4,000–6,500.

-The organisation has committed to secure this endangered species targeted for its miraculous beauty. Snow Leopard Foundation is affiliated internationally with the SLT.

-According to a new study by the SLT, Snow Leopards in Pakistan are threatened by the poachers from Afghanistan so trans-boundary cooperation is required for the protection of this endangered species.

-Though hunting snow leopards has been outlawed in Afghanistan since 2002, the Pak-Afghan border is a major place of the Snow Leopard hunting by the international poachers.

-The right of the snow leopard and its prey to survive is more generously guaranteed if the right of pastoral communities to optimise their economy is accepted and supported.

-Dr. Ali Nawaz states: “With the looming threats of increase in human population, retaliatory killings and urbanisation in the large habitat of the Snow Leopard, this species and other associated biodiversity in the region are threatened with extinction if adaptive measures based on solid empirical evidence and best conservation practices are not proactively pursued.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Eileen Zhang
Scoop.it!

Conservation Efforts Give Snow Leopards a Chance in Russia

Conservation Efforts Give Snow Leopards a Chance in Russia | Science Project | Scoop.it
SUNY-ESF is the oldest and most distinguished institution in the United States that focuses on the study of the environment.
Eileen Zhang's insight:

-The first step in restoring the population was snare removal and the development of local anti-poaching brigades, he said. This was followed by the installation of high-tech devices that monitor temperature in cabins used by poachers; when poachers arrive and start a fire for warmth, the sensors send an electronic signal that alerts officials of the poachers' presence. Gibbs said such a signal had been received the day of the lecture.

-As recently as three or four years ago, he said, he believed the outlook for snow leopards in the Altai was "bleak." But the anti-poaching efforts, combined with the abundance of prey and photographic evidence that the leopards are in the area, provide reason to believe the snow leopard population can increase to a less precarious level.

-providing economic opportunity to local residents so snow leopards have more value alive than dead. Many local people are herders who could lose scores of sheep to a snow leopard in a single night; conservation efforts can include steps to provide better protection to those herds. Conservation tourism, focused on travelers who can serve as citizen scientists who help with monitoring efforts, can also provide economic support for local residents.

-Gibbs' lecture, "On the Brink: Saving Russia's Last Snow Leopards," drew more than 300 students, faculty and staff, along with community members to learn about efforts to save the endangered predator in the remote and rugged Altai Republic.

-

more...
No comment yet.