Science - Pollution
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Rescooped by Beth Jennings from Geography Education
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Imported Air Pollution from Outsourcing

Imported Air Pollution from Outsourcing | Science - Pollution | Scoop.it

"Homegrown air pollution is bad enough, but for years scientists have tracked pollution rising out of Asia, crossing the Pacific Ocean, and descending over the western United States. A research team found that the Asian contribution over the southwestern United States could amount to 15 parts per billion of ozone (orange-red on three consecutive days in panels, left to right).  That could become even more troublesome, the authors note, if Asian imports increase as expected in the coming decades."

 

So in essence, sending manufacturing to China to avoid the Clean Air Act costs doesn't always lower our monetary costs nor does lower our environmental costs (not if our air is still polluted).  Geography is all about understanding the whole system, and the atmosphere does not recognize any international borders.  The Earth is our system. 


Via Seth Dixon
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The Kingdom Keepers's curator insight, November 26, 2013 9:50 AM

You know pollution is getting bad when it starts to affect countries oceans away. Society depicts that there is a pollution problem, but they do not take action-they merely address it. If humans are to find a solution to this problem, however, we need to actually take action.  

-Brooke

shamlabeth's curator insight, November 26, 2013 10:09 AM

I believe that Asia should think about what they are doing to the world. They are effecting the climate and the other countries with their burning of fossil fuels. It's not just them though because China is at the point where they have to wear mask out. we need to come together and make the world greener.-Amanda

Max Minard's curator insight, May 26, 2015 10:06 PM

This article talks about air pollution hazards in America that are resulting from the pollution incoming from across the Pacific Ocean. Over the past few years, Asian imports have also increased the rate of incoming pollution that originated in Asia and is being distributed across the United States. As the article states, Asia's contribution could amount to "15 parts per billion of ozone." My insight would be to control this increase in pollution by perhaps limiting Asian and American interaction. Although, at the same time this interaction is probably necessary to the overall economies of both sides involved. This issue has both pros and cons linked with it, but either way the increase in pollution still needs to be solved. 

Rescooped by Beth Jennings from #Communication
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5 Imaginative Buildings That Breathe Pollution And Clean The Air

5 Imaginative Buildings That Breathe Pollution And Clean The Air | Science - Pollution | Scoop.it
Rather than just being places to work, eat, and be entertained, buildings of the future might be used for "systemic" roles: say, generating power, or reusing garbage.

Via Prof. Hankell
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Prof. Hankell's curator insight, June 7, 2013 6:47 AM

SYSTEMIC = Of, relating to, or affecting the entire body or an entireorganism...

Rescooped by Beth Jennings from Sustain Our Earth
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China's heartland delivers pollution punch: study

China's heartland delivers pollution punch: study | Science - Pollution | Scoop.it
Washington (AFP) June 10, 2013 - China's lesser-developed heartland is responsible for 80 percent of carbon dioxide emissions related to goods consumed along the wealthier coast, international researchers said Monday.

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Rescooped by Beth Jennings from World Environment Nature News
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Exhaust fumes only third of traffic pollution problem

Exhaust fumes only third of traffic pollution problem | Science - Pollution | Scoop.it
Vehicle exhausts are responsible for only a third of traffic pollution, according to new research.

Via Maria Nunzia @Varvera
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Light pollution can impact nesting sea turtles

Light pollution can impact nesting sea turtles | Science - Pollution | Scoop.it
By Elizabeth HowellLiveScience Light pollution along the Mediterranean is changing the nesting habits of sea turtles in Israel, according to new research.

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Rescooped by Beth Jennings from sustainable architecture
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CO2ngress Towers: Reducing air pollution in Chicago + increasing public awareness

CO2ngress Towers:  Reducing air pollution in Chicago + increasing public awareness | Science - Pollution | Scoop.it

“Every day, 77,000 carbon-emitting vehicles fly past the Congress Parkway interchange, polluting the air. This project creates a gateway over the corridor that filters air and fuels a new breed of car for its residents.”

Aimed to increase public awareness and improve public health, the CO2ngress Gateway Towers absorb the CO2 emissions from passing cars, which is fed to algae grown in the building. The algae then helps with the processing of biofuels which supply the building residents’ eco-friendly cars.

The two towers split and converge at the top to create an iconic gateway to the city. A bridge joins the two towers and contains a public restaurant with views of neighboring buildings. Pedestrian connections are landscaped at the base, giving a human scale to a car-centric urban identity.

Additionally, the double-skin facade helps reduce traffic noise and offers enclosed balconies. Natural cross-ventilation of the units is enabled through the building’s atrium. The terraces are enclosed by bio-reactor tubes which grow the algae responsible for biofuel processing...


Via Lauren Moss
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Avneel Channan's curator insight, March 27, 2015 8:27 AM

This is a very innovative way of clearing C02 from the air. This is only the beginning of what this technology can bring to renewable energy and can really become evolutionary not to far from the future.  

Zohair Ahmed's curator insight, May 26, 2015 11:57 PM

These two buildings reduce air pollution in Chicago by absorbing CO2 from cars and feeding it to algae grown inside the building.


This architectual concept is very amazing, for it may influence many other buildings to do a similar process of removing pollution. Pollution from transportation is affiliated with Unit 7 as an Urban environmental issue.

Clayton Nelson's curator insight, December 3, 2015 10:06 AM

This is a great and awesome idea! Not only do they help the environment their appearance is also awesome. Now someone should convince all other large cities to build these.  CN

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Beijing's Pollution

Beijing's Pollution | Science - Pollution | Scoop.it

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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, November 24, 2014 2:21 PM

Great picture to show the two sectors of China's society. In Beijing we see the combination of industry and post industrialized. 

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, November 24, 2014 11:40 PM

This picture taken by a photographer with the perfect lighting is brilliant....that is, if you're into deceiving people that the pollution from these power plants stays away from the higher class businesses and residences.  Looking at this picture you see the smoke coming from the power plant in China far in the distance creating a yellowish hue that could be thought to be from the sun.  Then closer in the scene we see what appears to be businesses and potentially some peoples homes.  This area is in a totally different color from the yellow we see to be associated with the pollution from the power plant.  Here we see a blue, commonly associated with clean water, covering the entirety of this area.  With the difference in colors these places seem to be as different as possible from each other.  In reality though, smog doesn't just stay in one area of the city where it is produced, but spreads throughout the entirety of a city.  There are no restraints on where the pollution can and can't be, it is free flowing into communities where people work and live.  If you're trying to sell a house here this picture wouldn't be a bad idea to use, although most natives aren't oblivious to what is really going on.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 8:00 PM

This picture is interesting to say the least, it depicts two different cities, even though it is the same city. the picture does a good job at showing the major problem that pollution is causing to Beijing. While showing a smog surrounded city behind a clean, yet clouded looking city, drives this point of pollution home and raises the question is putting large factories and toxic fumes in the air, more important than the well being of your citizens?