Science News JBHS
30 views | +0 today
Follow
Science News JBHS
Science Current Events
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Julie Dunbar McTague from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

A flash of blue light changes cellular activity — and understanding of disease

A flash of blue light changes cellular activity — and understanding of disease | Science News JBHS | Scoop.it
With a milliseconds-long flash of blue light, Yale University researchers regulated a critical type of signaling molecule within cell membranes, another illustration of the power of light-based techniques to manipulate cell functions and thus to study mechanisms of disease. One of the most innovative new research approaches of recent years is called optogenetics or the use of genetically encoded probes to make cell functions sensitive to light. The team combined a plant protein that is sensitive to blue light with enzymes that catalyze the metabolism of signaling lipids within the cell membranes. When the complex was expressed in animal cells, scientists changed properties of cells such as their shape or ability to move simply by using blue light. By turning off the light, the researchers were able to rapidly reverse the changes they induced. They were also able to regulate activities within a region of a cell by illuminating the area.

Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Julie Dunbar McTague from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Very early in life, stem cells completely fix heart

Very early in life, stem cells completely fix heart | Science News JBHS | Scoop.it
New research shows that in a two-day-old mouse, a heart attack causes active stem cells to grow new heart cells and a few months after an attack, the heart is mostly repaired. But in an adult mouse, recovery from such an attack leads to classic after-effects: scar tissue, permanent loss of function, and life-threatening arrhythmias.

Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Julie Dunbar McTague from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

7,000th amphibian species just discovered, 3,000 of them discovered during last 25 years - many almost extinct

7,000th amphibian species just discovered, 3,000 of them discovered during last 25 years - many almost extinct | Science News JBHS | Scoop.it
The number of amphibians described by scientists now exceeds 7,000, or roughly 3,000 more than were known just 25 years ago, report researchers in Berkeley.

David Wake, an emeritus biology professor at the University of California, this week announced the 7,000th amphibian cataloged on AmphibiaWeb, a project which 2000 has sought to document every one of Earth's living frogs, salamanders, newts, and caecilians. The 3,000 'new' species means that scientists have described a previously unknown amphibian every two-and-a-half days since 1987. And the rate of new species descriptions may be accelerating: 100 species have been described so far in 2012.

 

But the discoveries mask bad news: global amphibian populations are in sharp decline due to the effects of climate change, habitat destruction, pollution, invasive species, overharvesting as food and for the pet trade, and the spread of chytridiomycosis, a deadly fungal disease. The IUCN Red List estimates that more than 40 percent of amphibians are at risk, while more than 150 species are known to have gone extinct since the early 1980s.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Julie Dunbar McTague from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Giant carbon-capturing funnels discovered in Southern Ocean

Giant carbon-capturing funnels discovered in Southern Ocean | Science News JBHS | Scoop.it

Oceans represent an important global carbon sink, absorbing 25% of annual man-made CO2 emissions and helping to slow the rate of climate change. The Southern Ocean in particular is known to be a significant oceanic sink, and accounts for 40% of all carbon entering the deep oceans. And yet, until now, no-one could quite work out how the carbon gets there from the surface waters.

 

A team of scientists from the UK and Australia has shed new light on the mysterious mechanism by which the Southern Ocean sequesters carbon from the atmosphere. Winds, vast whirlpools and ocean currents interact to produce localized funnels up to 1000 km across, which plunge dissolved carbon into the deep ocean and lock it away for centuries

 

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.