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Rescooped by Stuart Broadley from Amazing Science
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20,000+ FREE Online Science and Technology Lectures from Top Universities

20,000+ FREE Online Science and Technology Lectures from Top Universities | Science new | Scoop.it

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Arturo Pereira's curator insight, August 12, 2017 9:01 AM
The democratization of knowledge!
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, September 11, 2017 2:42 AM
FREE Online Science and Technology Lectures from Top Universities
Rescooped by Stuart Broadley from Longevity science
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Hydrogel could dispense pain-killing medicine to joints as they move

Hydrogel could dispense pain-killing medicine to joints as they move | Science new | Scoop.it

People suffering from joint problems such as osteoarthritis tend to take a lot of anti-inflammatory drugs, even though such medications affect their whole body, all of the time. Scientists at the University of Delaware, however, are developing what could be a more effective alternative. It's a hydrogel that can be injected into the joint, and it releases medication only in response to mechanical force – in other words, whenever the joint is used.

 

In laboratory tests, it was confirmed that when the hyaluronic acid-based hydrogel was compressed, encapsulated drugs that had been mixed into it were discharged into the surrounding environment.

 

 


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Team's curator insight, October 16, 2014 10:52 AM

philippe : ciblage d'actif

Rescooped by Stuart Broadley from Psychology and Brain News
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Language use is simpler than previously thought, study suggests

Language use is simpler than previously thought, study suggests | Science new | Scoop.it
For more than 50 years, language scientists have assumed that sentence structure is fundamentally hierarchical, made up of small parts in turn made of smaller parts, like Russian nesting dolls.

Via Dimitris Agorastos
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Rescooped by Stuart Broadley from Amazing Science
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Natural 3D Counterpart to Graphene Discovered

Natural 3D Counterpart to Graphene Discovered | Science new | Scoop.it

The discovery of what is essentially a 3D version of graphene – the 2D sheets of carbon through which electrons race at many times the speed at which they move through silicon – promises exciting new things to come for the high-tech industry, including much faster transistors and far more compact hard drives. A collaboration of researchers at the U.S Department of Energy (DOE)’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has discovered that sodium bismuthate can exist as a form of quantum matter called a three-dimensional topological Dirac semi-metal (3DTDS). This is the first experimental confirmation of 3D Dirac fermions in the interior or bulk of a material, a novel state that was only recently proposed by theorists.


“A 3DTDS is a natural three-dimensional counterpart to graphene with similar or even better electron mobility and velocity,” says Yulin Chen, a physicist from the University of Oxford who led this study working with Berkeley Lab’s Advanced Light Source (ALS) . “Because of its 3D Dirac fermions in the bulk, a 3DTDS also features intriguing non-saturating linear magnetoresistance that can be orders of magnitude higher than the materials now used in hard drives, and it opens the door to more efficient optical sensors.”


Chen is the corresponding author of a paper in Science reporting the discovery. The paper is titled “Discovery of a Three-dimensional Topological Dirac Semimetal, Na3Bi.”


Two of the most exciting new materials in the world of high technology today are graphene and topological insulators, crystalline materials that are electrically insulating in the bulk but conducting on the surface. Both feature 2D Dirac fermions (fermions that aren’t their own antiparticle), which give rise to extraordinary and highly coveted physical properties. Topological insulators also possess a unique electronic structure, in which bulk electrons behave like those in an insulator while surface electrons behave like those in graphene.


“The swift development of graphene and topological insulators has raised questions as to whether there are 3D counterparts and other materials with unusual topology in their electronic structure,” says Chen. “Our discovery answers both questions. In the sodium bismuthate we studied, the bulk conduction and valence bands touch only at discrete points and disperse linearly along all three momentum directions to form bulk 3D Dirac fermions. Furthermore, the topology of a 3DTSD electronic structure is also as unique as those of topological insulators.”


The discovery was made at the Advanced Light Source (ALS), a DOE national user facility housed at Berkeley Lab, using beamline 10.0.1, which is optimized for electron structure studies. The collaborating research team first developed a special procedure to properly synthesize and transport the sodium bismuthate, a semi-metal compound identified as a strong 3DTDS candidate by co-authors Fang and Dai, theorists with the Chinese Academy of Sciences.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Rescooped by Stuart Broadley from Longevity science
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Bad eating habits can be corrected by using the right workarounds

Bad eating habits can be corrected by using the right workarounds | Science new | Scoop.it

Just a reminder that no matter how difficult (or expensive) healthy eating appears to be, you can make it easier with a few workarounds.

 

These are not new tips, but it never hurts to refresh your committment.

 


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Yasmeen Lee's comment, April 8, 2013 12:08 PM
I think I will apply these helpful eating tips the next time I am grocery shopping or eating at a restaurant. It is so hard to eat healthy food these days when fast food is more convenient and less expensive. Almost every time I go out with my friends I am dragged to the nearest burger joint or ice cream shop. Now that I am more health conscious I have decided to take matters into my own hands. While I cannot stop my friends from making poor eating habits I know that I can fix mine. For example, I never skip breakfast because it is the most important meal that helps you get your day started. I was surprised that by eating fruit and protein each morning, I was less hungry and more focused. In addition, instead of depending on the vending machine to give me a bag of chips or candy, I now plan what snacks I will bring and how much I should eat. I have replaced my usual tea and sugary beverage with water. When I was younger I always thought vegetables were tasteless and gross. Now that I am starting to cook for myself I have found ways to incorporate them into my diet without sacrificing taste. The next time my friends invite me to go eat out I will make sure to plan ahead and look for the healthiest option available.