SCIENCE IN GENERAL
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Toward tires that repair themselves

Toward tires that repair themselves | SCIENCE IN GENERAL | Scoop.it
A cut or torn tire usually means one thing—you have to buy a new one. But some day, that could change. For the first time, scientists have made tire-grade rubber without the processing step—vulcanization—that has been essential to inflatable tires since their invention. The resulting material heals itself and could potentially withstand the long-term pressures of driving. Their report appears in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

 

Vulcanization involves adding sulfur or other curatives to make rubber more durable while maintaining its elasticity. But once an errant piece of glass or other sharp object pierces a tire, it can't be patched for long-term use. Researchers are beginning to develop self-healing rubber in the laboratory, but these prototypes might not be stable over time either. Amit Das and colleagues wanted to address that shortcoming.

 

Using a new simple process that avoids vulcanization altogether, the researchers chemically modified commercial rubber into a durable, elastic material that can fix itself over time. Testing showed that a cut in the material healed at room temperature, a property that could allow a tire to mend itself while parked. And after 8 days, the rubber could withstand a stress of 754 pounds per square inch. Heating it to 212 degrees Fahrenheit for the first 10 minutes accelerated the repair process. The researchers say their product could be further strengthened by adding reinforcing agents such as silica or carbon black.

 

Reference: Ionic Modification Turns Commercial Rubber into a Self-Healing Material, ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces, 2015, 7 (37), pp 20623–20630 DOI: 10.1021/acsami.5b05041


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Million Dollar Math Problem - Numberphile - YouTube

Here is the biggest (?) unsolved problem in maths... The Riemann Hypothesis. Prime Number Theorem: http://youtu.be/l8ezziaEeNE Fermat's Last Theorem: http://...

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Sue Thuma's curator insight, March 21, 2014 2:27 PM

Fascinating stuff!  

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Calculus Video Tutorials - Calculus Help Video Resource | StraighterLine

Calculus Video Tutorials - Calculus Help Video Resource | StraighterLine | SCIENCE IN GENERAL | Scoop.it
Struggling with calculus? StraighterLine's calculus video tutorials will help make solving those college math problems easier. Find the calculus help you need in our video library.

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White Group Mathematics's curator insight, March 4, 2014 11:44 PM

A rather large collection of free video tutorials for the Calculus student.


Hope this is useful. Peace.

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Best of 2013: How Google Converted Language Translation Into a Problem of Vector Space Mathematics | MIT Technology Review

Best of 2013: How Google Converted Language Translation Into a Problem of Vector Space Mathematics | MIT Technology Review | SCIENCE IN GENERAL | Scoop.it
In September, a team of Google engineers showed how to translate one language into another by finding the linear transformation that maps one to the other.

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Laurence Cuffe's curator insight, January 22, 2014 6:05 AM

This is a rescoop and its worth looking around at the other content when you get there!

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Math for Love: The Angle Maze - New York Times

Math for Love: The Angle Maze - New York Times | SCIENCE IN GENERAL | Scoop.it
Math for Love: The Angle Maze
New York Times
It didn't seem fair — or helpful — to come in with a really exciting, novel math lesson.

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Relax, there's nothing to fear in mathematics but fear itself - Brisbane Times

Relax, there's nothing to fear in mathematics but fear itself - Brisbane Times | SCIENCE IN GENERAL | Scoop.it
Relax, there's nothing to fear in mathematics but fear itself
Brisbane Times
Maths is valued because it is considered an indicator of intelligence, so showing poor mathematical ability has implications for how smart you will be perceived to be.

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Laurence Cuffe's curator insight, July 29, 2013 8:03 AM

Culturaly I wonder how diverse maths anxiety is and whether it comes out in different forms depending on the society which the students is in?

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MIT develops system to write computer code using ordinary language

MIT develops system to write computer code using ordinary language | SCIENCE IN GENERAL | Scoop.it

In a pair of recent papers, researchers at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory have demonstrated that it is possible to write computer programs using ordinary language rather than special-purpose programming languages. A new algorithm can automatically convert natural-language specifications into "regular expressions" — special-purpose combinations of symbols that allow very flexible searches of digital files.

The work may be of some help to programmers, and it could let nonprogrammers manipulate common types of files — like word-processing documents and spreadsheets — in ways that previously required familiarity with programming languages. But the researchers’ methods could also prove applicable to other programming tasks, expanding the range of contexts in which programmers can specify functions using ordinary language.

“I don’t think that we will be able to do this for everything in programming, but there are areas where there are a lot of examples of how humans have done translation,” says Regina Barzilay, an associate professor of computer science and electrical engineering and a co-author on both papers. “If the information is available, you may be able to learn how to translate this language to code.”


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Skip Stein's curator insight, July 14, 2013 9:12 AM

This used to be called COBOL!  Now they are trying to 'invent' English language programming AGAIN?  There was also a 'language' called 'ENGLISH' by MicroData decades ago (early precursor to SQL).  If COBOL would have been allowed to progress, we wouldn't be coding in C+ and other low level languages.  Thanks to Microsoft who torpedoed the entire computer language development. (IMHO)

Miro Svetlik's curator insight, July 15, 2013 7:13 AM

I am really wondering how would my daily vocal output look like in form of RegEx. However it is a nice achievement that we can map human language to regular expression formula. Still I personally think that successful implementation of AI which will be able to foresee human mistakes will be necessary before such a conversions can take place in daily life.

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White Group A level JC H2 Maths tuition: Designing a killer question (2)

White Group A level JC H2 Maths tuition: Designing a killer question (2) | SCIENCE IN GENERAL | Scoop.it
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Mathematical Art Presented by the American Mathematical Society

Mathematical Art Presented by the American Mathematical Society | SCIENCE IN GENERAL | Scoop.it

"The connection between mathematics and art goes back thousands of years. Mathematics has been used in the design of Gothic cathedrals, Rose windows, oriental rugs, mosaics and tilings. Geometric forms were fundamental to the cubists and many abstract expressionists, and award-winning sculptors have used topology as the basis for their pieces. Dutch artist M.C. Escher represented infinity, Möbius bands, tessellations, deformations, reflections, Platonic solids, spirals, symmetry, and the hyperbolic plane in his works.

 

"Mathematicians and artists continue to create stunning works in all media and to explore the visualization of mathematics--origami, computer-generated landscapes, tesselations, fractals, anamorphic art, and more."

 


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BookChook's curator insight, May 31, 2013 6:52 PM

Help kids connect Maths with Art 

Cameron Brotherton -Jennings's comment, May 31, 2013 10:40 PM
Music Mathematics Man
MsPedagogicalProwess's curator insight, April 13, 2014 12:28 AM

Provides an insight into the cross integration between Maths and Arts. This is a great link, for a foray into higher order thinking, and visualisation. Could be a valuable resource for upper primary, in linking their mathematical learning to a more meaning context (in linking to their experiences of art in nature and in man-made objects around them) –


There are links to galleries & exhibitions – which could translate into a class excursion. 

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Jinha Lee: Reach into the computer and grab a pixel | Video on TED.com

The border between our physical world and the digital information surrounding us has been getting thinner and thinner. Designer and engineer Jinha Lee wants to dissolve it altogether.

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Sue Thuma's curator insight, July 6, 2013 11:03 AM

Anyone who doesn't think education needs to change and in a hurry needs to listen to this.  I taught computer classes in the 80's with Commodore PETS in my classroom so I love seeing these advances.

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Onderzoekers: bloeddruk rond het hart 's nachts hoger dan gedacht - 50plus

Onderzoekers: bloeddruk rond het hart 's nachts hoger dan gedacht - 50plus | SCIENCE IN GENERAL | Scoop.it
Opmerkelijk: Tot voor kort werd aangenomen dat de bloeddruk ‘s nachts behoorlijk daalt.
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EINDTIJDNIEUWS: Wereldberoemde hartchirurg onthult ware oorzaak hartaandoeningen

EINDTIJDNIEUWS: Wereldberoemde hartchirurg onthult ware oorzaak hartaandoeningen | SCIENCE IN GENERAL | Scoop.it

De wereldberoemde hartchirurg Dwight Lundell heeft 25 jaar ervaring in zijn vakgebied, heeft meer dan 5.000 openhartoperaties verricht en moet nu toegeven dat hij ernaast zat.  

 

Op basis van de wetenschappelijke literatuur hield het medisch establishment altijd vol dat hartziekten het gevolg zijn van een verhoogd cholesterolgehalte.

 

De enige geaccepteerde therapie was het voorschrijven van medicijnen die cholesterol verlagen en een vetarm dieet. Gesteld werd dat een vetarm dieet zou leiden tot een lager cholesterolgehalte en dus minder hartkwalen. Afwijken van deze aanbevelingen werd gezien als ketterij.  

 

Het werkt niet!

Deze aanbevelingen zijn niet meer wetenschappelijk of moreel verdedigbaar.Enkele jaren geleden werd ontdekt dat ontstekingen in de aderwand de werkelijke oorzaak zijn van hartziekten. Langzamerhand vindt er een paradigmaverschuiving plaats.De diëtaire aanbevelingen hebben inmiddels wel een diabetes- en obesitas-epidemie veroorzaakt. Ondanks het feit dat 25 procent van de bevolking dure statines slikt en dat veel vet is verdwenen uit ons dieet, overlijden er meer mensen aan hartziekten dan ooit tevoren! Uit de statistieken van de American Heart Association blijkt bijvoorbeeld dat 75 miljoen Amerikanen momenteel lijdt aan hartziekten en dat nog eens 20 miljoen diabetes hebben. De patiënten worden bovendien steeds jonger.  

 

Ontstekingen gevolg van vetarm dieet

Zonder ontstekingen in het lichaam zal cholesterol zich nooit ophopen in de aderwand, om vervolgens hartziekten of beroertes te kunnen veroorzaken. Zonder ontstekingen zou cholesterol vrijelijk door het lichaam bewegen, zoals de natuur het bedoeld heeft. Door ontstekingen houdt het lichaam cholesterol gevangen.Een ontsteking is het natuurlijke afweermechanisme van het lichaam om een indringer zoals een bacterie, gifstof of virus uit de weg te ruimen. Wanneer we het lichaam echter continu blootstellen aan gifstoffen of voedsel, dat het lichaam niet goed kan verteren, krijgen we last van chronische ontsteking.De schade en ontstekingen aan onze bloedvaten worden veroorzaakt door het vetarme dieet, dat al jaren wordt aanbevolen door de reguliere geneeskunde. Door het overmatig gebruik van bewerkte koolhydraten, zoals suiker en meel en de overconsumptie van plantaardige oliën uit sojabonen, maïs en zonnebloem ontstaat chronische ontsteking. 

 

Becel Pro-activ werkt niet

In Nederland vinden we bijvoorbeeld Becel Pro-activ in de supermarkt. Unilever belooft dat de boter het cholesterol verlaagt en hart- en vaatziekten voorkomt. ‘Aanbevolen door de Hartstichting’ staat prominent op de zijkant. Becel Pro-activ bevat echter onnatuurlijk grote hoeveelheden plantensterol. De consumptie van plantensterolen in bijvoorbeeld sojaolie kan leiden tot een toename van het risico op hart- en vaatziekten en is een risicofactor voor het ontstaan van aderverkalking. De organisatie wil nu dat het product uit de supermarkten verdwijnt.  

 

Wat kunnen we er tegen doen?

Dr. Lundell heeft dit gezien in duizenden en duizenden bloedvaten. Wat kunnen we ertegen doen? Eet meer eiwitten voor sterkere spieren. Kies koolhydraten die zeer complex zijn, zoals in kleurrijk fruit en in groenten. Gebruik geen soja- of maïsolie en het bewerkte voedsel dat ervan wordt gemaakt. Kies daarentegen voor olijfolie of biologische roomboter.

 

Door voedsel dat ontstekingen in je lichaam veroorzaakt te vermijden en essentiële voedingsstoffen uit vers onbewerkt voedsel tot je te nemen, herstel je de schade aan je bloedvaten en de rest van je lichaam.   

 

Geüpload door truthheartdisease op 10 sep 2010 Dr. Dwight Lundell beantwoordt vragen over statine medicatie, behandeling met een statine, het nemen van statines, statine LDL, hart- en vaatziekten en ontstekingen. 

 

In het artikel ook een film met de dr.

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UNSW - MATH 3560: History of Mathematics

UNSW - MATH 3560: History of Mathematics. This is a collection of video lectures on MATH 3560 - History of Mathematics given by UNSW's Professor NJ Wildberger.
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Very interesting !

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Khan Academy Unveils New Math Resources for Common Core

Khan Academy Unveils New Math Resources for Common Core | SCIENCE IN GENERAL | Scoop.it

Khan Academy's new, free math materials include interactive math exercises and grade-level "missions."


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Earth’s devastating supervolcanoes powered by density differences

Earth’s devastating supervolcanoes powered by density differences | SCIENCE IN GENERAL | Scoop.it
As magma cools, low density material can be forced through the Earth's crust.
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Perhaps the world's most famous supervolcano, the Yellowstone Caldera. 
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Animal Pompeii: Exquisitely preserved feathered dinosaur fossils date back to a catastrophic event

Animal Pompeii: Exquisitely preserved feathered dinosaur fossils date back to a catastrophic event | SCIENCE IN GENERAL | Scoop.it

A series of fossil discoveries in the 1990s changed our understanding of the lives of early birds and mammals, as well as the dinosaurs they shared an ecosystem with. All those discoveries had one thing in common: they came from a small region in northern China that preserved what is now called the Jehol Biota.

 

Until now, however, no one knew why so many well-preserved fossils were found in that region. In a new study published in Nature Communications, researchers discovered that this remarkable preservation might have been the result of a Pompeii-like event, where hot ash from a volcanic eruption entombed these animals.

 

According to Leicester University's Sarah Gabbott (who wasn’t involved in the study), “Unravelling the environments in which fossilization took place, as the authors do in this paper, is very important. It places the fossils within the context of their habitat and it allows us to determine what filters and biases may have played a part.” These biases may affect which organisms get preserved.

 

The fossils of the Jehol Biota are from the Early Cretaceous period, about 130 million years ago, and they comprise a wide variety of animals and plants. So far, about 60 species of plants, 1,000 species of invertebrates, and 140 species of vertebrates have been found in the Jehol Biota.

 

One of the most remarkable discoveries to arise from these fossils came in 2010, when Michael Benton of the University of Bristol found colour-banding preserved in dinosaur fossils. These stripes of light and dark are similar to stripes in modern birds, and they provided further evidence that dinosaurs evolved into birds. Benton also found that these fossils had intact mealnosomes—organelles that make pigments. This discovery allowed paleontologists to tell the colors of dinosaurs' feathers for the first time.

 

The area that supported the Jehol Biota is suspected to have been a wetland with many lakes. Most fossils are found in lakebeds, suggesting that either the fossils were washed into these lakes by floods or that the animals were in the lakes before fossilization took place.

 

Baoyu believes that if fossils don't separate bone joints, it means the animals must have been in the lake before dying. But that is not a convincing argument, Gabbott said. "A freshly dead carcass, buoyed by decay gases which collect in the stomach, can be transported for tens if not hundreds of kilometers without such disarticulation."

 

No other fossil location, let alone that which produced so many well-preserved samples, has ever been suggested to have undergone a similar event. However, a comparison can be made to what happened in Pompeii in 79 AD when Mount Vesuvius erupted. The ensuing destruction led to the preservation of the city’s architecture and objects but not of people or animals. The human and animal remains we see from Pompeii are plaster casts of the empty spaces their decomposed bodies left in the ash.


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Why Nikola Tesla was the greatest geek who ever lived - The Oatmeal

Why Nikola Tesla was the greatest geek who ever lived - The Oatmeal | SCIENCE IN GENERAL | Scoop.it

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The Mathematical Yawp: The Lesson of Grace in Teaching

The Mathematical Yawp: The Lesson of Grace in Teaching | SCIENCE IN GENERAL | Scoop.it
RT @ahc: Francis Su won the highest teaching award in the field of mathematics. His award lecture was about grace. Amazing. http://t.co/KeHo1sxj

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7 Greatest Mathematics of All Time - Siliconindia.com

7 Greatest Mathematics of All Time - Siliconindia.com | SCIENCE IN GENERAL | Scoop.it
7 Greatest Mathematics of All Time
Siliconindia.com
Euler, considered to be on par with Albert Einstein in terms of intelligence level, introduced most of the contemporary mathematical terminology and notation, particularly for mathematical analysis.

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Using maths to explain the universe

Using maths to explain the universe | SCIENCE IN GENERAL | Scoop.it
LEONARD SUSSKIND is a professor of theoretical physics at Stanford University and director of the Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics. He is regarded as one...
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White Group A level JC H2 Maths tuition: Designing a killer question (3)

White Group A level JC H2 Maths tuition: Designing a killer question (3) | SCIENCE IN GENERAL | Scoop.it
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Using maths to explain the universe

Using maths to explain the universe | SCIENCE IN GENERAL | Scoop.it
LEONARD SUSSKIND is a professor of theoretical physics at Stanford University and director of the Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics. He is regarded as one...
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Vitamine D verlaagt risico op beroerte en hartaanval - Gezondheidsplein.nl

Vitamine D verlaagt risico op beroerte en hartaanval - Gezondheidsplein.nl | SCIENCE IN GENERAL | Scoop.it
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Doorbraak in diagnose hartritmestoornis

Doorbraak in diagnose hartritmestoornis | SCIENCE IN GENERAL | Scoop.it
Voor het eerst is het mogelijk de loop van de hartslag driedimensionaal in kaart te brengen.

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Physicists create tabletop antimatter 'gun'

Physicists create tabletop antimatter 'gun' | SCIENCE IN GENERAL | Scoop.it
(Phys.org) —An international team of physicists working at the University of Michigan has succeeded in building a tabletop antimatter 'gun' capable of spewing short bursts of positrons.
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Researchers at SLAC find too many taus decay from bottom quarks to fit Standard Model !

http://phys.org/news/2012-09-slac-taus-bottom-quarks-standard.html#inlRlv

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