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10 More Amazing Science Stunts

Visit https://twitter.com/RichardWiseman Music by http://www.youtube.com/user/ElectricUnicycleCrew.
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Defenders of the Earth

Defenders of the Earth | Science | Scoop.it
ON JUNE 24th NASA, America’s space agency, announced it had discovered the 10,000th “Near Earth Object” (NEO), the rather dry name given to asteroids and...
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So just what is out there beyond the Standard Model for Particle Physics?

So just what is out there beyond the Standard Model for Particle Physics? | Science | Scoop.it

Earlier this week, evidence was presented measuring a very rare decay rate — albeit not incredibly precisely — which point towards the Standard Model being it as far as new particles accessible to colliders (such as the LHC) go. In other words, unless we get hit by a big physics surprise, the LHC will become renowned for having found the Higgs Boson and nothing else, meaning that there’s no window into what lies beyond the Standard Model via traditional experimental particle physics.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Respiratory System of Birds and Alligators has efficient unidirectional airflow and originates from dinosaurs

Respiratory System of Birds and Alligators has efficient unidirectional airflow and originates from dinosaurs | Science | Scoop.it

The lungs of birds have long been known to move air in only one direction during both inspiration and expiration through most of the tubular gas-exchanging bronchi (parabronchi). Recently a similar pattern of airflow has even been observed in Alligators, a sister taxon to birds. The pattern of flow appears to be due to the arrangement of the primary and secondary bronchi, which, via their branching angles, generate inspiratory and expiratory aerodynamic valves. Both the anatomical similarity of the avian and alligator lung and the similarity in the patterns of airflow raise the possibility that these features are plesiomorphic for Archosauria and therefore did not evolve in response to selection for flapping flight or an endothermic metabolism, as has been generally assumed. As in birds and alligators, air flows cranially to caudally in the cervical ventral bronchus, and caudally to cranially in the dorsobronchi in the lungs of Nile crocodiles. The cervical ventral bronchus, cranial dorsobronchi and cranial medial bronchi display similar characteristics to their proposed homologues in the alligator, while there is considerable variation in the tertiary and caudal group bronchi. Taken together, these data indicate that the aspects of the crocodilian and avian bronchial tree that maintain the aerodynamic valves and thus generate unidirectional airflow, are ancestral for Archosauria and have evolved over 100 million years ago.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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10 Lesser Known Amazing Human Body Facts - Listverse

10 Lesser Known Amazing Human Body Facts - Listverse | Science | Scoop.it
Of all experiences in nature, none are closer to us than the characteristics of our own bodies. However, the true nature of the human body is still being u

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Should Obesity Be Defined as a Disease? The AMA Thinks So

Should Obesity Be Defined as a Disease? The AMA Thinks So | Science | Scoop.it
Some doctors are asking if the controversial designation will help the problem.

Via Alison D. Gilbert
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Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, June 28, 2013 9:45 PM

Is this part of the DSM 5 controversy?

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Is it Better to Walk or Run in the Rain?

Subscribe to MinutePhysics - it's FREE! http://dft.ba/-minutephysics_sub For recent scientific publications on the walk/rain question: http://iopscience.iop....
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