Science
12 views | +0 today
Follow
Science
science, technology, gadgets and many more...
Curated by Lavan
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Lavan
Scoop.it!

How dangerous are false widow spiders?

How dangerous are false widow spiders? | Science | Scoop.it
A school has been closed because of a venomous spider, and experts say they are on the increase. But how much of a threat do they really pose? (BBC News - How dangerous are false widow spiders?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lavan
Scoop.it!

Best cameras, smartphones, tablets and gadgets for travel in 2014 - Herald Sun

Best cameras, smartphones, tablets and gadgets for travel in 2014 - Herald Sun | Science | Scoop.it
Best cameras, smartphones, tablets and gadgets for travel in 2014
Herald Sun
Best cameras, smartphones, tablets and gadgets for travel in 2014. by: Jennifer Dudley-Nicholson National Technology Editor; From: Escape; October 27, 2013 12:00AM.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lavan
Scoop.it!

Building Blocks: Awesome Lego Science Models - Wired Science

Building Blocks: Awesome Lego Science Models - Wired Science | Science | Scoop.it
If you love Lego and science, you'll love this. Trust us: http://t.co/ndy1c74FHn #wiredclassic http://t.co/X9Ks8K1AXP
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lavan from Digital-News on Scoop.it today
Scoop.it!

How many iPhones did Apple sell last quarter?

How many iPhones did Apple sell last quarter? | Science | Scoop.it
The analysts’ estimates range from 29 million to 38 million. Average: 33.4 million. FORTUNE — This is the number that matters.

Via Thomas Faltin
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lavan from Digital-News on Scoop.it today
Scoop.it!

What will Apple name its next OS X? Here are a few ideas

What will Apple name its next OS X? Here are a few ideas | Science | Scoop.it
OS X Mavericks is here, and with it comes Apple's all-new naming scheme for its software. Leaving cats behind, the company is instead focusing on locations in California for its software monikers.

Via Thomas Faltin
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lavan
Scoop.it!

1p Diy Easy Kitchen Perfect Magic Roll Sushi maker Cutter Roller Machine Gadgets

1p Diy Easy Kitchen Perfect Magic Roll Sushi maker Cutter Roller Machine Gadgets | Science | Scoop.it
1p Diy Easy Kitchen Perfect Magic Roll Sushi maker Cutter Roller Machine Gadgets in Home & Garden, Kitchen, Dining & Bar, Kitchen Tools & Gadgets | eBay (1p Diy Easy Kitchen Perfect Magic Roll Sushi maker Cutter Roller Machine Gadgets
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lavan
Scoop.it!

GeoFlyer Südtirol 3D

GeoFlyer Südtirol 3D | Science | Scoop.it
GeoFlyer – Südtirol / Alto Adige 3D allows to navigate in 3D one of the most beautiful mountain areas of the world.
The dataset contains very high resolution data, and the terrain shape is shown ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lavan
Scoop.it!

Data Shows Google's Robot Cars Are Smoother, Safer Drivers Than You or I - MIT Technology Review

Data Shows Google's Robot Cars Are Smoother, Safer Drivers Than You or I - MIT Technology Review | Science | Scoop.it
Data Shows Google's Robot Cars Are Smoother, Safer Drivers Than You or I
MIT Technology Review
Tests of Google's autonomous vehicles in California and Nevada suggests they already outperform human drivers.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lavan
Scoop.it!

MOGA's Upcoming iPhone Game Controller Leaked in New Photos

MOGA's Upcoming iPhone Game Controller Leaked in New Photos | Science | Scoop.it
After Apple announced support for an upcoming "Made for iPhone" (MFi) program supporting certified game controllers using new APIs in iOS 7, a report indicated that Logitech and MOGA were among the first wave of companies to be working closely with...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lavan from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Making hydrogen easily is dream goal for sustainable energy: Bacteria have done that for billions of years

Making hydrogen easily is dream goal for sustainable energy: Bacteria have done that for billions of years | Science | Scoop.it

Making hydrogen easily and cheaply is a dream goal for clean, sustainable energy. Bacteria have been doing exactly that for billions of years, and now chemists at the University of California, Davis, and Stanford University are revealing how they do it, and perhaps opening ways to imitate them.

 

A study published Oct. 25, 2013 in the journal Science describes a key step in assembling the hydrogen-generating catalyst. "It's pretty interesting that bacteria can do this," said David Britt, professor of chemistry at UC Davis and co-author on the paper. "We want to know how nature builds these catalysts — from a chemist's perspective, these are really strange things."

 

The bacterial catalysts are based on precisely organized clusters of iron and sulfur atoms, with side groups of cyanide and carbon monoxide. Those molecules are highly toxic unless properly controlled, Britt noted.

The cyanide and carbon monoxide groups were known to come from the amino acid tyrosine, Britt said. Jon Kuchenreuther, a postdoctoral researcher in Britt's laboratory, used a technique called electron paramagnetic resonance to study the structure of the intermediate steps.

 

They found a series of chemical reactions involving a type of highly reactive enzyme called a radical SAM enzyme. The tyrosine is attached to a cluster of four iron atoms and four sulfur atoms, then cut loose leaving the cyanide and carbon monoxide groups behind.

 

"People think of radicals as dangerous, but this enzyme directs the radical chemistry, along with the production of normally poisonous CO and CN, along safe and productive pathways," Britt said. Kuchenreuther, Britt and colleagues also used another technique, Fourier Transform Infrared to study how the iron-cyanide-carbon monoxide complex is formed. That work will be published separately.

 

"Together, these results show how to make this interesting two-cluster enzyme," Britt said. "This is unique, new chemistry." Britt's laboratory houses the California Electron Paramagnetic Resonance center (CalEPR), the largest center of its kind on the west coast.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lavan from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Bacteriograph: Photographs Printed with Bacterial Growth

Bacteriograph: Photographs Printed with Bacterial Growth | Science | Scoop.it

Microbiologist-turned-photographer Zachary Copfer has developed an amazing photo-printing technique that’s very different from any we’ve seen before. Rather than use photo-sensitive papers, chemicals, or ink, Copfer uses bacteria. The University of Cincinnati MFA photography student calls the technique “bacteriography”, which involves controlling bacteria growth to form desired images.

Here’s how Copfer’s method works: he first takes a supply of bacteria like E. coli, turns it into a fluorescent protein, and covers a plate with it. Next, he creates a “negative” of the photo he wants to print by covering the prepared plate with the photo and then exposing it to radiation. He then “develops” the image by having the bacterial grow, and finally “fixes” the image by coating the image with a layer of acrylic and resin.

 

Using this process, he creates images of things ranging from famous individuals to Hubble telescope photos of galaxies. Copfer writes that his project is intended to be a counterexample to the false dichotomy of art and science.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lavan
Scoop.it!

12 Ways To Younger Looking Eyes

12 Ways To Younger Looking Eyes | Science | Scoop.it
New York dermatologist and cosmetic surgeon Dr. Cameron Rokhsar, M.D., lists the top eye care treatments and habits that can reverse signs of aging and create younger looking eyes.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lavan
Scoop.it!

This Week in Photography: Naked Skiing, Real-World GIFs, and a White House Wedding

This Week in Photography: Naked Skiing, Real-World GIFs, and a White House Wedding | Science | Scoop.it
Boy do we have a froofy 10-layer burrito of photo happenings this week. GIFs you can hold in your hands, naked skiing, a Tim Page tell-all about his time in Vietnam and much, much more. We hope you saved room.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lavan
Scoop.it!

The new Mac Pro - The new Mac Pro: You have to see to believe (pictures)

The new Mac Pro - The new Mac Pro: You have to see to believe (pictures) | Science | Scoop.it
Apple brings a radical new look to the Mac Pro in its 2013 edition. It's a tall black cylinder -- but much smaller than the high-end tower it replaces. (Check out this technology.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lavan
Scoop.it!

These Proto-GIFs of the 19th Century Put Today's GIFs to Shame

These Proto-GIFs of the 19th Century Put Today's GIFs to Shame | Science | Scoop.it
They're cheeky and creepy and totally mesmerizing.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lavan
Scoop.it!

Funny Science Memes

Funny Science Memes | Science | Scoop.it
Science like you have never seen it before, funny! (If you like "How I Met Your Mother," you will like #7 http://t.co/m6vI9eQ27f)
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lavan from Digital-News on Scoop.it today
Scoop.it!

MUNSTER: Apple Will Release The iPhone 6 With A Big Screen Next Summer

MUNSTER: Apple Will Release The iPhone 6 With A Big Screen Next Summer | Science | Scoop.it
Apple analyst Gene Munster is out with an earnings preview for Apple, which reports next Monday.
In the preview, Munster gives his reasons for being bullish about the stock. He has a $640 price target.

Via Thomas Faltin
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lavan
Scoop.it!

The technology that puts the human touch into prostheses

The technology that puts the human touch into prostheses | Science | Scoop.it
Mark Miodownik: The touch-sensitive technology used in smartphones is helping to create a revolution in artificial limbs (RT @guardianscience: The technology that puts the human touch into prostheses http://t.co/k0KGuVMIeB)...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lavan
Scoop.it!

How to make your TV a touchscreen

How to make your TV a touchscreen | Science | Scoop.it
LJ Rich looks at a cheap way to turn your big screen TV into a touchscreen. (How turn a normal TV into a touchscreen http://t.co/qQdO1PDyfq)
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lavan
Scoop.it!

Top 10 kitchen gadgets - Telegraph.co.uk

Top 10 kitchen gadgets - Telegraph.co.uk | Science | Scoop.it
Top 10 kitchen gadgets
Telegraph.co.uk
Garlic presses are one of those kitchen gadgets it's easy to turn your nose up at until you use one.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lavan
Scoop.it!

10 Cyborg Jack-o'-Lanterns for Terrifying the Neighborhood Kids

10 Cyborg Jack-o'-Lanterns for Terrifying the Neighborhood Kids | Science | Scoop.it
Why settle for traditional jack-o'-lanterns when technology makes it so easy to take things far too far? Here are 10 examples of over-the-top pumpkin horrors.
    
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lavan from healthcare technology
Scoop.it!

Can Mobile Health Technologies Transform Health Care?

Can Mobile Health Technologies Transform Health Care? | Science | Scoop.it

There is substantial enthusiasm for the concept of mobile health (mHealth), a broad term typically used to describe the use of mobile telecommunication technologies for the delivery of health care and in support of wellness. In 2011, US Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius referred to mHealth as “the biggest technology breakthrough of our time” and maintained that its use would “address our greatest national challenge.


This level of exuberance for mHealth is driven by the convergence of 3 powerful forces. First is the unsustainability of current health care spending and the recognition of the need for disruptive solutions. Second is the rapid and ongoing growth in wireless connectivity—there now are more than 3.2 billion unique mobile users worldwide—and the remarkable capability this brings for the bidirectional instantaneous transfer of information. Third is the need for more precise and individualized medicine; a refinement in phenotypes that mandates novel, personal data streams well beyond the occasional vital sign or laboratory data available through intermittent clinic visits.


mHealth could benefit ambulatory individuals in 2 general ways: (1) allow them to more easily and reliably self-diagnose their acute symptoms, and (2) enhance monitoring, tracking, and communication of various biometric information (eg, blood pressure, glucose levels, spirometry values, oxygen saturation) for individuals with chronic medical conditions, enabling greater engagement and partnership in their care. 


mHealth technologies have the potential to change every aspect of the health care environment and to do so while delivering better outcomes and substantially lowering costs. For consumers, mHealth offers the promise of improved convenience, more active engagement in their care, and greater personalization. For clinicians, mHealth could lead to reduced demands on their time and permit them to instead refocus on the art of medicine. Much remains to be done to drive this transformation. Most critically needed is real-world clinical trial evidence to provide a roadmap for implementation that confirms its benefits to consumers, clinicians, and payers alike.

 

 


For more see the original : http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleID=1762473


Via nrip
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lavan from Technology in Business Today
Scoop.it!

Top 10 Reasons to Use Technology in Education

While there are some nay-sayers who bring up some negative effects of technology on education in the classrooms, mainly budgetary reasons, using new technolo...

Via TechinBiz
more...
Tonya D Harris's curator insight, December 10, 2013 6:38 PM

Visual for teachers that are apprehensive about technolgy

 

Meleny Weber's curator insight, December 15, 2013 5:52 PM

After watching this video, I truly learned a lot about the many different benefits of technology in the classroom. The man talking throughout the video starts off with an interesting qoute that grabbed my attention. He says, "Teachers will not be replaced by technology, but teachers who don't use technology will be replaced by those who do." This man truly believes that technology is the future of education, and all teachers should begin to accept that. All teachers should start using technology on a daily basis in their classroom. The rest of the video is him explaining his reasons for why teachers need to. Most of the reasons, I have already heard throughout other articles and blogs of similar nature. Some reasons that stood out to me where the fact that technology helps students with professional developmemnt. We are living in a world where the technology field/industry is continuosly growing, and we need people to work these jobs. You might as well start training the future professionals when they are young and in school. Another interesting reason is that technology in the classroom improves schools' test scores. At first I was skeptical, and was very curious as to the man's explanation. He went on to say that the use of computers in classrooms allows students to each move at their own pace. If there is one student who really understands a concept much quicker than the rest of the class, that student can move on to the next subject by using the internet and pre-recorded lectures from the teacher. This is beginning to get into the idea of blended learning, another one of my scoopit topics. I am beginning to see that the increase in technology in classrooms around the United States, is the reason behind the new wave of blended learning or "flipped classroom" in so many of the schools today. I enjoyed that this video did not focus on one specific piece of technology, but that it talked about several different ones you can incorporate into the classroom for different reasons. 

Rescooped by Lavan from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Money does grow on trees: Gold found in tree leaves, leads to vast hidden underground deposits

Money does grow on trees: Gold found in tree leaves, leads to vast hidden underground deposits | Science | Scoop.it
Forget everything your parents ever taught you about managing your finances: Down under in Australia, scientists have found money growing on trees. Not paper money, of course, but eucalyptus leaves that are imbued with small amounts of pure gold.

 

These gilded leaves can help gold exploration companies discover new, underground gold deposits in difficult-to-reach locations.

 

The research, carried out by Melvyn Lintern at the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) and friends, discovered that trees in Australia and elsewhere in the world can be used to locate gold deposits that are more than 30 meters (100 feet) below the surface. Small amounts of gold are dissolved in water, which is then sucked up by tree roots. These particles eventually find themselves deposited in the leaves of the trees (the red dots in the image above).

 

Sadly, we’re talking about very small quantities of gold. Lintern says you would need to harvest 500 trees growing over a gold deposit to be able to make a gold ring. In scientific terms, we’re talking about a gold concentration of just 100 parts-per-billion in leaves, and about 50 ppb in twigs. To discover such tiny concentrations you can’t just use a conventional microscope: The Australian scientists had to use a synchrotron, a vast room-sized machine that uses X-rays to map the various elements present in a sample.

 

Still, despite the fact that money only grows on trees in minuscule amounts, the main takeaway here is that trees can be used to pinpoint underground gold deposits. As it stands, most gold is currently mined from outcrops, where gold-rich veins have been brought to the surface. As you can probably imagine, underground exploration — as with many new crude oil discoveries — is a lot more expensive and risky. If large gold deposits can be discovered just by analyzing a few leaves — and around 30% of the world’s gold reserves are believed to be under the Goldfields-Esperance region in Australia – then the price of gold could soon drop very quickly indeed. There’s no reason this technique can’t be applied to other important and valuable metals, such as copper and platinum, too.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lavan from healthcare technology
Scoop.it!

Google Glass passes clinical 'proof of concept'

Google Glass passes clinical 'proof of concept' | Science | Scoop.it

A new project to assess to feasibility of using Google Glass to provide doctors with hands-free access to clinical information looks to have passed its first hurdle.


Now a joint Philips-Accenture study of the smart-glasses technology has outlined how doctors could simultaneously monitor a patient's vital signs and react to surgical procedural developments without having to turn away from the patient or procedure.

 

The partners say their 'proof of concept' project also opens up the possibility of doctors monitoring a patient's vital signs remotely or enlisting assistance from doctors in other locations.

 

Still not commercially available, or even fully tested, bringing Google Glass to the operating theatre suggests a number of exciting possibilities, particularly when apps come online for the wearable computer.

 

“We live in a world where being nimble is key and industry-altering ideas need to be converted to practical solutions that people can use,” said Michael Mancuso, CEO, patient care and clinical informatics at Philips Healthcare.

 

“This research explores how doctors can achieve better access to the right information at the right time so they can focus on more efficient and effective

 

The project saw Google Glass connected to Philips IntelliVue Solutions, which forms a key part of the technology firm's healthcare offering.

 

original: http://www.pmlive.com/blogs/digital_intelligence/archive/2013/october/google_glass_passes_clinical_proof_of_concept


Via nrip
more...
No comment yet.