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The Science of Love

TWEET IT - http://clicktotweet.com/s36dT It turns out the brain in love looks strikingly similar to one on drugs like cocaine! Find out what drives love, and...
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¿Somos todos 'marcianos'?

¿Somos todos 'marcianos'? | science | Scoop.it
¿Somos todos marcianos? El científico Steven Benner defiende en un congreso que un mineral fundamental para la vida llegó a la Tierra desde el planeta rojo.
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Space Oddity

A revised version of David Bowie's Space Oddity, recorded by Commander Chris Hadfield on board the International Space Station. (Note: This video cannot be r...
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Descubren en Canadá el agua más antigua del mundo

Descubren en Canadá el agua más antigua del mundo | science | Scoop.it
Se encuentra a más de 2 km bajo la superficie de Ontario y ha permanecido inalterada y sin contacto con el exterior durante al menos 1.500 millones de años

Via Rafa Andreo
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Jay Silver: Hack a banana, make a keyboard! | Video on TED.com

Why can't two slices of pizza be used as a slide clicker? Why shouldn't you make music with ketchup? In this charming talk, inventor Jay Silver talks about the urge to play with the world around you.
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Tyler DeWitt: Hey science teachers -- make it fun | Video on TED.com

High school science teacher Tyler DeWitt was ecstatic about a lesson plan on bacteria (how cool!) -- and devastated when his students hated it. The problem was the textbook: it was impossible to understand.

Via Rafa Andreo
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Hey science teachers -- make it fun | TED.com

High school science teacher Tyler DeWitt was ecstatic about a lesson plan on bacteria (how cool!) -- and devastated when his students hated it. The problem was the textbook: it was impossible to understand.

Via Beth Dichter
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Shynade Smith's curator insight, May 29, 2017 4:13 AM

Wonderful video about the importance of keeping children engaged with science, over ensuring that every child has to know every single about a progess.

Breanna's comment, June 2, 2017 7:39 AM
I've seen this TED talk before and it really hits the nail on the head for many students in science. Why would anyone want to pursue a career in science if all they get to experience are facts and figures with a bit of experimentation thrown in! I actually based my Literacy and Numeracy assignment on this. The learning experience for students was to develop a creative story based around a pathogen of their choosing. They had to include how the pathogen was spread, what it did to the person who contracted it (symptoms) and how that person was treated. It was aimed at year 9 students within a biology based unit of work. I would love to implement it one day to see how students respond.
Breanna's curator insight, June 2, 2017 7:41 AM

I've seen this TED talk before and it really hits the nail on the head for many students in science. Why would anyone want to pursue a career in science if all they get to experience are facts and figures with a bit of experimentation thrown in! I actually based my Literacy and Numeracy assignment on this. The learning experience for students was to develop a creative story based around a pathogen of their choosing. They had to include how the pathogen was spread, what it did to the person who contracted it (symptoms) and how that person was treated. It was aimed at year 9 students within a biology based unit of work. I would love to implement it one day to see how students respond.

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¿Apareció el continente perdido? - euronews

¿Apareció el continente perdido? - euronews | science | Scoop.it
euronews
¿Apareció el continente perdido?

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Research Uncovers Fundamental Property of Rarest Atom on Earth

Research Uncovers Fundamental Property of Rarest Atom on Earth | science | Scoop.it
Researcher carried out ground-breaking experiments to investigate the atomic structure of astatine, the rarest naturally occurring element on Earth.
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Se confirma la existencia de un nuevo elemento en la tabla periódica

Se confirma la existencia de un nuevo elemento en la tabla periódica | science | Scoop.it
Se confirma un nuevo elemento en la tabla periódic Un grupo de científicos europeos han confirmado la inclusión de este elemento, al que de momento llaman ununpentio.
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Un eclipse solar en Marte

Un eclipse solar en Marte | science | Scoop.it
Un eclipse marciano La sonda Curiosity de la NASA ha captado las imágenes más nítidas obtenidas hasta ahora de un eclipse solar desde Marte.
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Boaz Almog “levitates” a superconductor | Video on TED.com

How can a super-thin 3-inch disk levitate something 70,000 times its own weight?
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Physics Achieve What Alchemy Could Not, Turning Lead Into Gold (Infographic)

Physics Achieve What Alchemy Could Not, Turning Lead Into Gold (Infographic) | science | Scoop.it
The legendary feat of turning lead into gold was actually impossible by alchemic means, even with the possession of the magical philosophers stone - except if they actually used the same high-tech machinery that is used today to actually make it...

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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The Science of Star Trek Into Darkness | TrekMovie.com

The Science of Star Trek Into Darkness | TrekMovie.com | science | Scoop.it
What a real volcano looks like. The science behind the volcano: Oh so close, but not quite right. We cannot take the heat, cap'n! Here's where the volcano scene took a turn for the less believable. Both Sulu and Scotty suggest ...
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Teen's science project could charge phones in 20 seconds

Teen's science project could charge phones in 20 seconds | science | Scoop.it
An 18-year-old's science fair project leads her to create an improved supercapacitor with technology that could provide super-fast phone charging in the future. Read this article by Amanda Kooser on CNET.
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Five Innovative Technologies that Bring Energy to the Developing World

Five Innovative Technologies that Bring Energy to the Developing World | science | Scoop.it

From soccer balls to cookstoves, engineers are working on a range of devices that provide cheap, clean energy.

 

In the wealthy world, improving the energy system generally means increasing the central supply of reliable, inexpensive and environmentally-friendly power and distributing it through the power grid. Across most of the planet, though, simply providing new energy sources to the millions who are without electricity and depend on burning wood or kerosene for heat and light would open up new opportunities.

 

With that in mind, engineers and designers have recently created a range of innovative devices that can increase the supply of safe, cheap energy on a user-by-user basis, bypassing the years it takes to extend the power grid to remote places and the resources needed to increase a country’s energy production capacity. Here are a few of the most promising technologies.

 

The picture above shows the Window Socket, the perhaps simplest solar charger in existence! Just stick it on a sunny window for 5 to 8 hours with the built-in suction cup, and the solar panels on the back will store about 10 hours worth of electricity that can be used with any device. If there’s no window available, a user can just leave it on any sunny surface, including the ground. Once it’s fully charged, it can be removed and taken anywhere—inside a building, stored around in a bag or carried around in a vehicle. The designers, Kyuho Song and Boa Oh of Yanko Design, created it to resemble a normal wall outlet as closely as possible, so it can be used intuitively without any special instructions.

 

Solar window chargers are reviewed here:

http://tinyurl.com/aawaoyg

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Green Living 4 Live's comment, May 21, 2013 1:11 PM
Great!, more green tech is good for our earth.