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Rescooped by AnnC from New Work, New Livelihood, Careers
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Personality Research Says Change in Major Traits Occurs Naturally - Wall Street Journal

Personality Research Says Change in Major Traits Occurs Naturally - Wall Street Journal | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it

Personality Research Says Change in Major Traits Occurs Naturally ~ Wall Street Journal.   Psychologists label five personality traits and explain which increase and decrease with age.

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"Many people become more agreeable, dependable and emotionally stable, and also more introverted." 

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But in a new twist with lots of ramifications for therapists, researchers have learned that being happy to begin with may help change your personality.
 

 

A study published online in January in the Journal of Personality analyzed personality and well-being data from more than 16,000 Australians who were surveyed repeatedly between 2005 and 2009. The researchers found people who were happy in 2005 tended to become more emotionally stable, more conscientious, more agreeable and—perhaps most intriguingly—more introverted over the next four years.

 

 
Via Santosh Kumar Nair, Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, April 25, 2014 10:45 AM

Helpful to know, and to understand, with age.  Heads up therapists!  It also is consistent with Jungian psychology.  ~  D

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4 Unique Working Styles: What's Yours?

4 Unique Working Styles: What's Yours? | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it

Via The Learning Factor
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, September 5, 2013 6:36 PM

There is nothing more frustrating than listening to people haggle over different definitions of what constitutes "work." Catty conversations about who's working harder, who's working smarter, or who's not working at all are more about judging others than solving inefficiencies.


I'd like to steer you away from this all-or-nothing dialogue ("I work all the time and you never work") to a more robust conversation about what work really is. And, in the process, help you to appreciate not only your own unique working style, but also the working style of others on your team.


As my thinking has developed over the years, and after perusing many, many personality tests, I believe that there are four basic working styles: Doing, Leading, Loving, and Learning.


The best teams have a balance of all four styles. And the best organisations have many well-balanced teams who are confident in their working style and understand the necessity of divergent types or work. So, what's your style?

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The Science of What Makes an Introvert and an Extrovert

The Science of What Makes an Introvert and an Extrovert | School Psychology Tech | Scoop.it

 

 


Via The Learning Factor
AnnC's insight:

Allow students to learn in their own way that fits their personality.

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The Learning Factor's curator insight, September 10, 2013 6:53 PM

Extroverts are typically thought of as those people who are outspoken, outgoing and predominately concerned with what's going on with the outer world. Introverts, by contrast, are quiet, reflective and focused on the inner (mental) world. However, E/I is often seen as a kind of continuum, with people exhibiting a mix of introverted and extroverted tendencies.


If you put introverts into an environment with a lot of stimulation, such as a loud restaurant, they will quickly become overwhelmed or overloaded, causing them to sort of shut down to stop the influx of information. Because of this fact, introverts tend to avoid such active environments. Extroverts, on the other hand, are only minimally aroused, so they seek out highly stimulating environments to augment their arousal levels.