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The Reading Brain in the Digital Age: The Science of Paper versus Screens: Scientific American

The Reading Brain in the Digital Age: The Science of Paper versus Screens: Scientific American | School libraries | Scoop.it
E-readers and tablets are becoming more popular as such technologies improve, but research suggests that reading on paper still boasts unique advantages

Via Nik Peachey
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Cyd Madsen's curator insight, May 16, 2013 12:57 AM

Hmmmmm.......

Lou Salza's curator insight, May 16, 2013 8:53 AM

I have been using text to speech almost exclusively for reading articles on the web, newspapers, and courese reading for a course in Leadership I am taking at Case Western Reserve University. I love the e-readers ( Read and Write Gold; Kindle, and Audio books)  because I can jack up the speed and read with my ears as fast as non dyslexics who are fluent readers read with their eyes. We need to understand the 'cost' of eye reading to dyslexic students even when they "graduate" from OG or Wilson: the burden of phonological processing is too high in terms of fatigue. If we don't make the technology more available and acceptable in schools we will deny intelligent students with print challenges the opportunity to study in college, graduate or professional schools. 

I still read paper books.  Right now I am reading  A light in August by Faulkner. It is on my night stand and it is a wonderful if slow experience for me. For some, print will never 'fall away' and allow for effortless decoding and pholonological recoding.--Lou  

 

Excerpt:

"Understanding how reading on paper is different from reading on screens requires some explanation of how the brain interprets written language. We often think of reading as a cerebral activity concerned with the abstract—with thoughts and ideas, tone and themes, metaphors and motifs. As far as our brains are concerned, however, text is a tangible part of the physical world we inhabit. In fact, the brain essentially regards letters as physical objects because it does not really have another way of understanding them. As Wolf explains in her book Proust and the Squid, we are not born with brain circuits dedicated to reading. After all, we did not invent writing until relatively recently in our evolutionary history, around the fourth millennium B.C. So the human brain improvises a brand-new circuit for reading by weaving together various regions of neural tissue devoted to other abilities, such as spoken language, motor coordination and vision..."

AnnC's curator insight, May 22, 2013 7:57 PM

Check out the debate.

Rescooped by Caroline from Book Week 2016
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EdTech Chic: Using "Celebrity Bookprints" from @Scholastic - What's YOUR bookprint? #bmswired

EdTech Chic: Using "Celebrity Bookprints" from @Scholastic - What's YOUR bookprint? #bmswired | School libraries | Scoop.it

Via Audrey Nay, Petra Pollum
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Literacy and learning linked to school library resourcing

Literacy and learning linked to school library resourcing | School libraries | Scoop.it

In April 2012, Softlink conducted the third annual Australian School Library Survey. The 2012 Softlink School Library Survey reports key findings into Australian school library budgets, staffing and literacy levels. Softlink has conducted the annual survey since 2010. Findings from these reports have been recognised and used by the Australian Government, the Australian School Library Association (ASLA) and Australian Library and Information Association (ALIA).


Via Karen Bonanno, Petra Pollum
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Inklings » what sort of book is this?

Inklings » what sort of book is this? | School libraries | Scoop.it

Via Jean Anning, Petra Pollum
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Jean Anning's curator insight, March 27, 2013 3:42 AM

a simple guide to genre (Humour)

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Write 'Choose Your Own Adventure’ Books Through This Clever HTML5 App

Write 'Choose Your Own Adventure’ Books Through This Clever HTML5 App | School libraries | Scoop.it

The branching narratives of interactive books are logistical nightmares. That is, until one company released this free writing tool


Via The Digital Rocking Chair, Petra Pollum
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