School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor
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School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor
Tools, tips, resources, advice, and humor to support today's school leader and leaders, in general
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Uncovering complex network structures in nature

Uncovering complex network structures in nature | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Several models have already been proposed to generate networks of interacting individuals with wildly varying connectivity. The most famous of these is known as preferential attachment and follows the social maxim of "the rich get richer". As time progresses, the individuals in the network with the most connections are the ones most likely to acquire new connections. Just as in the real world, wealth attracts still more wealth and societies develop with most people having little and a small minority having most of the resources.
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Why Your Friends Have More Friends Than You Do

Why Your Friends Have More Friends Than You Do | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

The title of Feld’s paper says it all, and here’s a little demonstration you can do to confirm his conclusion.  List all of your friends.  Then ask each of your friends how many friends they have.  No matter who you are, whether you are a man or a woman, where you live, how many (or few) friends you have, and who your friends are, you will very likely discover that your friends on average have more friends than you do.

Sharrock's insight:

We need to explore the social-emotional impacts of maintaining social networks (digital as well as face-to-face). This is topic relates well to math and science. The topic may interest secondary students and could be tied in to critical thinking skills, explorations of cognitive bias, fallacies, and other ways to be more rational. Kids in high school are familiar with social networds and recognize that some keep count of numbers of connections/friends/nodes in the network of a specific person. The article also introduces the social-emotional impact of becoming aware of those numbers, saying that this awareness "depresses" the person. School counselors might crosswalk a lesson that explores this impact: math, social studies, science, health. 

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Has Google Destroyed Your Memory? No. It’s Much Weirder Than That.

Has Google Destroyed Your Memory? No. It’s Much Weirder Than That. | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
The following is excerpted from Clive Thompson’s book Smarter Than You Think: How Technology Is Changing Our Minds for the Better, out now from the Penguin Press. Is the Internet ruining our ability to remember facts?

Via Anna Hu
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from the article: "We don't remember in isolation—and that's a good thing. "Quite simply, we seem to record as much outside our minds as within them," as Wegner has written. "Couples who are able to remember things transactively offer their constituent individuals storage for and access to a far wider array of information than they would otherwise command." These are, as Wegner describes it in a lovely phrase, "the thinking processes of the intimate dyad."

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Anna Hu 's curator insight, October 7, 2013 8:31 PM

Interesting read.

Sharrock's curator insight, October 15, 2013 10:55 AM

from the article: "We don't remember in isolation—and that's a good thing. "Quite simply, we seem to record as much outside our minds as within them," as Wegner has written. "Couples who are able to remember things transactively offer their constituent individuals storage for and access to a far wider array of information than they would otherwise command." These are, as Wegner describes it in a lovely phrase, "the thinking processes of the intimate dyad.""

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How Your Mission Drives Your Strategy | Digital Tonto

How Your Mission Drives Your Strategy | Digital Tonto | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it
Great businesses, in the final analysis, are built by passion. Strategies can come and go, but the mission of the enterprise is fundamental to directing action
Sharrock's insight:

important section: "More recently, there has been a seismic shift in the strategic environment.  Whereas we used to compete in distinct industries with clear boundaries, today business is dominated by open ecosystems.  Although Apple is an integrated firm, its App store allowed thousand of developers to enhance its product, without having to coordinate with Jobs or his firm.

This has had a profound effect on how we have to think about strategy.  Every media company now must consider Amazon a threat, although Amazon itself is a retailer that competes with Walmart.  It also recently launched a Fire phone and is in a pitched battle with Microsoft to win dominance in cloud services.

The result is that strategy is no longer just about efficiencies and capabilities along the value chain, but also widening and deepening networks of connections.  In today’s semantic economy, the structure of your relationships is every bit as important—if not more important—than the structure of your organization."

 

 

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Why Your Friends Have More Friends Than You Do

Why Your Friends Have More Friends Than You Do | School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor | Scoop.it

The title of Feld’s paper says it all, and here’s a little demonstration you can do to confirm his conclusion.  List all of your friends.  Then ask each of your friends how many friends they have.  No matter who you are, whether you are a man or a woman, where you live, how many (or few) friends you have, and who your friends are, you will very likely discover that your friends on average have more friends than you do.

Sharrock's insight:

We need to explore the social-emotional impacts of maintaining social networks (digital as well as face-to-face). This is topic relates well to math and science. The topic may interest secondary students and could be tied in to critical thinking skills, explorations of cognitive bias, fallacies, and other ways to be more rational. Kids in high school are familiar with social networds and recognize that some keep count of numbers of connections/friends/nodes in the network of a specific person. The article also introduces the social-emotional impact of becoming aware of those numbers, saying that this awareness "depresses" the person. School counselors might crosswalk a lesson that explores this impact: math, social studies, science, health. 

more...
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